consonant

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English consonant or consonaunt, from Old French consonant, from Latin cōnsonāns (sounding with), from the prefix con- (with) + the present participle sonāns (sounding), from sonāre (to sound). The Latin is a calque of Ancient Greek σύμφωνον (súmphōnon).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

consonant (plural consonants)

  1. (phonetics) A sound that results from the passage of air through restrictions of the oral cavity; any sound that is not the dominant sound of a syllable, the dominant sound generally being a vowel.
  2. A letter representing the sound of a consonant.
    The 19 unquestionable consonants in the English alphabet are B, C, D, F, G, H, J, K, L, M, N, P, Q, R, S, T, V, X, Z.
    • 1892, Walter Besant, “Prologue: Who is Edmund Gray?”, in The Ivory Gate: A Novel, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers, [], OCLC 16832619:
      Thus, when he drew up instructions in lawyer language, he expressed the important words by an initial, a medial, or a final consonant, and made scratches for all the words between; his clerks, however, understood him very well.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Adjective[edit]

consonant (comparative more consonant, superlative most consonant)

  1. Characterized by harmony or agreement.
    • 1710, William Beveridge, The true nature of the Christian church, the office of its ministers, and the means of grace administred by them explain'd. In twelve sermons
      Each one pretends that his opinion [] is consonant to the words there used.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dr. H. More and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      That where much is given shall be much required is a thing consonant with natural equity.
    • 1946, United States Supreme Court, Pennekamp v. Florida 328 U.S. 331,334
      This essential right of the courts to be free of intimidation and coercion was held to be consonant with a recognition that freedom of the press must be allowed in the broadest scope compatible with the supremacy of order.
  2. Having the same sound.
    • 1645-1650, James Howell, Epistolae Ho-Elianae
      consonant words and syllables
  3. (music) Harmonizing together; accordant.
    consonant tones; consonant chords
  4. Of or relating to consonants; made up of, or containing many, consonants.
    • (Can we date this quote by T. Moore and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      No Russian whose dissonant consonant name / Almost shatters to fragments the trumpet of fame.

Quotations[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin consonans, attested from the 14th century.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

consonant (masculine and feminine plural consonants)

  1. consonant

Noun[edit]

consonant f (plural consonants)

  1. consonant

References[edit]

  1. ^ “consonant” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

cōnsonant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of cōnsonō