letter

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

letters (1)
a letter (2)

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle English letter, lettre, from Old French letre, from Latin littera ‎(letter of the alphabet"; in plural, "epistle), from Etruscan, from Ancient Greek διφθέρᾱ ‎(diphthérā, tablet). Displaced native Middle English bocstaf, bookstave ‎(letter, alphabetic symbol) (from Old English bōcstæf ‎(alphabetic symbol, written character)), Middle English bocrune, bocroune ‎(letter, written character) (from Old English bōc ‎(book) + rūn ‎(letter, rune)), Middle English writrune, writroune ‎(letter, document) (from Old English writ ‎(letter, epistle) + rūn ‎(letter, rune)), Old English ǣrendbōc ‎(letter, message), Old English ǣrendġewrit ‎(letter, written message).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

letter ‎(plural letters)

  1. A symbol in an alphabet.
    There are twenty-six letters in the English alphabet.
    • Bible, Luke xxiii. 38
      And a superscription also was written over him in letters of Greek, and Latin, and Hebrew.
  2. A written or printed communication, generally longer and more formal than a note.
    I wrote a letter to my sister about my life.
    • William Walsh (1662-1708)
      The style of letters ought to be free, easy, and natural.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 1, A Cuckoo in the Nest[1]:
      He read the letter aloud. Sophia listened with the studied air of one for whom, even in these days, a title possessed some surreptitious allurement.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, An Autobiography, Part I, chapter4:
      An indulgent playmate, Grannie would lay aside the long scratchy-looking letter she was writing (heavily crossed ‘to save notepaper’) and enter into the delightful pastime of ‘a chicken from Mr Whiteley's’.
  3. Literal meaning.
    • Jeremy Taylor (1613–1677)
      We must observe the letter of the law, without doing violence to the reason of the law and the intention of the lawgiver.
    • Tennyson (1809-1892)
      I broke the letter of it to keep the sense.
    • 2009, 23 February, BBC, Euro MP expenses 'can reach £1m'
      Some MEPs from some countries may have pocketed £2m more than I have by observing the letter but not the spirit of the rules.
  4. (plural) Literature.
    Benjamin Franklin was multiskilled - a scientist, politician and a man of letters.
  5. (US, uncountable) A size of paper, 8½ in × 11 in (215.9 mm × 279.4 mm, US paper sizes rounded to the nearest 5 mm).
  6. (Canada, uncountable) A size of paper, 215 mm × 280 mm.
  7. (US, scholastic) Short for varsity letter.
  8. (printing, dated) A single type; type, collectively; a style of type.
    • John Evelyn (1620-1706)
      Under these buildings [] was the king's printing house, and that famous letter so much esteemed.
Quotations[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
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Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

letter ‎(third-person singular simple present letters, present participle lettering, simple past and past participle lettered)

  1. (transitive) to print, inscribe, or paint letters on something.
  2. (intransitive, US, scholastic) To earn a varsity letter (award).

Etymology 2[edit]

let +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

letter ‎(plural letters)

  1. One who lets, or lets out.
    the letter of a room
    a blood-letter
  2. (archaic) One who retards or hinders.

Statistics[edit]

External links[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

letter f ‎(plural letters or letteren, diminutive lettertje n)

  1. letter (letter of the alphabet)

Derived terms[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

letter

  1. present tense of lette

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

letter

  1. indefinite plural of lett