rum

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See also: Rum, rúm, rùm, Rùm, rüm, and rum.

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹʌm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌm

Etymology 1[edit]

In common use since by at least 1654,[1] of uncertain origin. Theories include:

  • that it derives from rum (fine, good), or from the last syllable of Latin saccharum (given the harsh taste of earlier rum, the first theory is now considered unlikely),[2]
  • that it is a shortening of rumbullion[3] or rumbustion,[4] or
  • that it is from a Romani word for "strong, potent" which is (perhaps) the source of ramboozle and rumfustian (but these drinks were not originally made with rum)
  • that it derives from rummer, from Dutch[5]

Noun[edit]

rum (countable and uncountable, plural rums)

  1. (uncountable) A distilled spirit derived from fermented cane sugar and molasses.
    The Royal Navy used to issue a rum ration to sailors.
  2. (countable) A serving of rum.
    Jake tossed down three rums.
  3. (countable) A kind or brand of rum.
    Bundaberg is one of my favourite rums.
  4. (obsolete, slang) A queer or odd person or thing.
  5. (obsolete, slang) A country parson.
    • (Can we date this quote by Jonathan Swift and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      No company comes / But a rabble of tenants, and rusty dull rums.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the earlier form rome, slang for "good"; possibly of Romani origin; compare rom.

Adjective[edit]

rum (comparative rummer, superlative rummest)

  1. (obsolete) Fine, excellent, valuable. [16th c.]
    having a rum time
  2. (Britain, colloquial, dated) Strange, peculiar. [18th c.]
    a rum idea; a rum fellow
Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum (plural rums)

  1. (Britain, colloquial, dated) Any odd person or thing.

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortening of rummy.

Noun[edit]

rum

  1. (rare) The card game rummy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ In that year, Connecticut ordered confiscation of "whatsoever Barbados liquors, commonly called rum, kill devil and the like". See Charles A. Coulombe, Rum (2005, →ISBN.
  2. ^ Wayne Curtis, And a Bottle of Rum (2006, Random House, →ISBN, pages 34–35.
  3. ^ rum” in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  4. ^ rum” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  5. ^ Anthony Dias Blue, The Complete Book of Spirits : A Guide to Their History, Production, and Enjoyment (2004, HarperCollins, →ISBN

Anagrams[edit]


Chuukese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English room.

Noun[edit]

rum

  1. room

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from German Rum, from English rum, originally rumbullion.[1]

Noun[edit]

rum m

  1. rum
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from German Rummel (bustle).[2]

Noun[edit]

rum m

  1. rubble
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "rum²" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007
  2. ^ "rum¹" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007

Further reading[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse rúmr, from Proto-Germanic *rūmaz (roomy, spacious, open).

Adjective[edit]

rum

  1. wide, spacious
Usage notes[edit]

Only used in the expressions:

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse rúm, from Proto-Germanic *rūmą (room, open space).

Noun[edit]

rum n (singular definite rummet, plural indefinite rum)

  1. room (part of a building)
  2. compartment
  3. (chiefly definite) space (the universe except Earth and its atmosphere)
    De fravalgte at udforske rummet.
    They chose not to explore space.
Declension[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See rumme (to contain, hold).

Verb[edit]

rum

  1. imperative of rumme

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English rum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum m (uncountable)

  1. rum (alcoholic beverage)

Derived terms[edit]


Fiji Hindi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English room.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum

  1. room

References[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From dialectal German (e)rum, reduced form of herum and in some dialects darum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

rum

  1. (colloquial) Alternative form of herum (around)

Usage notes[edit]

  • While most or all instances of standard herum can be replaced with rum in the vernacular, compounds that are inherently colloquial will typically sound odd when herum is used in them. These will appear in writing with rum or not at all.

Derived terms[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

rum

  1. Romanization of 𐍂𐌿𐌼

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Rum.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈrum]
  • Hyphenation: rum
  • Rhymes: -um

Noun[edit]

rum (plural rumok)

  1. rum (a distilled spirit)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative rum rumok
accusative rumot rumokat
dative rumnak rumoknak
instrumental rummal rumokkal
causal-final rumért rumokért
translative rummá rumokká
terminative rumig rumokig
essive-formal rumként rumokként
essive-modal
inessive rumban rumokban
superessive rumon rumokon
adessive rumnál rumoknál
illative rumba rumokba
sublative rumra rumokra
allative rumhoz rumokhoz
elative rumból rumokból
delative rumról rumokról
ablative rumtól rumoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
rumé rumoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
ruméi rumokéi
Possessive forms of rum
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. rumom rumjaim
2nd person sing. rumod rumjaid
3rd person sing. rumja rumjai
1st person plural rumunk rumjaink
2nd person plural rumotok rumjaitok
3rd person plural rumjuk rumjaik

Derived terms[edit]

(Compound words):

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English rum.

Noun[edit]

rum m (genitive singular rum, nominative plural rumanna)

  1. rum

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English rum.

Noun[edit]

rum m (invariable)

  1. rum (distilled spirit)

Derived terms[edit]


Kashubian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum m

  1. space

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Low German Ruum, from Old Saxon rūm, from Proto-Germanic *rūmą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum m (diminutive rumk)

  1. room, space

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *rūmaz. Cognate with Old Saxon rūm, Dutch ruim, Old High German rūm, Old Norse rúmr, Gothic 𐍂𐌿𐌼𐍃 (rums).

Adjective[edit]

rūm

  1. spacious, roomy, open
    Ðis rume landthe wide world
    (Cædmon’s Metrical Paraphrase)
    rūmwellespacious
  2. free, unrestricted
    rūmgāljoy of freedom, release
  3. long, extended (of time)
  4. liberal, extensive, ample, abundant, bountiful, expansive, generous
    rūmġifolbountiful, liberal
    rūmmōdnesliberality, big-heartedness
  5. great, noble, august
    rūmheortgenerous
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *rūmą, from Proto-Indo-European *rowǝ-. Cognate with Old Saxon rūm (Low German Ruum, Dutch ruim, Old High German rūm (German Raum), Old Norse rūm (Danish and Swedish rum), Gothic 𐍂𐌿𐌼𐍃 (rums).

Noun[edit]

rūm n

  1. space; a room
  2. a space of time, an interval; an opportunity
    Rum wæs to nimanne londbuendum on ðam laðestan...It was an opportunity for the land-dwellers to seize from the most hated ones...
    (Judith)
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Middle English: roum, roume

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare German herum.

Adverb[edit]

rum

  1. around

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
Rum

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English rum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum m inan

  1. rum (distilled spirit)
  2. rum (serving)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • rum in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • rum in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum m (plural runs)

  1. rum

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse rúm, from Proto-Germanic *rūmą, from Proto-Indo-European *rowǝ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum n

  1. room; part of a building.
    Jag vill ha en lägenhet med två rum
    I want a flat with two rooms
  2. room; empty, available space; enough space
    Har du rum i din väska så att du kan lägga ner min bok också?
    Do you have enough space in your bag so that you could put my book too in it?
  3. (mathematics) space
    Linjärt rum
    Linear space

Declension[edit]

Declension of rum 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative rum rummet rum rummen
Genitive rums rummets rums rummens

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English room.

Noun[edit]

rum

  1. room

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum

  1. safflower