rum

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See also: Rum, rúm, rùm, Rùm, rüm, rum-, and rum.

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

In common use since by at least 1654,[1] of uncertain origin. Theories include:

  • that it derives from rum(fine, good), or from the last syllable of Latin saccharum (given the harsh taste of earlier rum, the first theory is now considered unlikely),[2]
  • that it is a shortening of rumbullion[3] or rumbustion,[4] or
  • that it is from a Romani word for "strong, potent" which is (perhaps) the source of ramboozle and rumfustian (but these drinks were not originally made with rum)
  • that it derives from rummer, from Dutch[5]

Noun[edit]

rum ‎(countable and uncountable, plural rums)

  1. (uncountable) A distilled spirit derived from fermented cane sugar and molasses.
    The Royal Navy used to issue a rum ration to sailors.
  2. (countable) A serving of rum.
    Jake tossed down three rums.
  3. (countable) A kind or brand of rum.
    Bundaberg is one of my favourite rums.
  4. (obsolete, slang) A queer or odd person or thing.
  5. (obsolete, slang) A country parson.
    • Jonathan Swift
      No company comes / But a rabble of tenants, and rusty dull rums.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From the earlier form rome, slang for good; possibly of Romani origin; compare rom.

Adjective[edit]

rum ‎(comparative rummer, superlative rummest)

  1. (obsolete) Fine, excellent, valuable. [16th c.]
    having a rum time
  2. (Britain, colloquial, dated) Strange, peculiar. [18th c.]
    a rum idea; a rum fellow
    "Lor, Noah!" said Charlotte, "What a rum creature you are! Why don't you let the boy alone?" - Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist
    • 1951, C. S. Lewis, Prince Caspian, Google Books
      "Can't you see him?"
      "Well, I almost thought I did—for a moment. It's such a rum light."
    • 1976, James Herriot, All Things Wise and Wonderful, page 346
      "She's as 'appy as Larry, but she'll neither move nor eat. It's a rum 'un, isn't it?" It was very rum indeed.
Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortening of rummy.

Noun[edit]

rum

  1. (rare) The card game rummy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ In that year, Connecticut ordered confiscation of "whatsoever Barbados liquors, commonly called rum, kill devil and the like". See Charles A. Coulombe, Rum (2005, ISBN 0806525835).
  2. ^ Wayne Curtis, And a Bottle of Rum (2006, Random House, ISBN 978-0-307-33862-4), pages 34–35.
  3. ^ rum” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online.
  4. ^ rum” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  5. ^ Anthony Dias Blue, The Complete Book of Spirits : A Guide to Their History, Production, and Enjoyment (2004, HarperCollins, ISBN 0-06-054218-7)

Anagrams[edit]


Chuukese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English room.

Noun[edit]

rum

  1. room

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from German Rum, from English rum, originally rumbullion.[1]

Noun[edit]

rum m

  1. rum
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from German Rummel(bustle).[2]

Noun[edit]

rum m

  1. rubble
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ rum² in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007
  2. ^ rum¹ in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse rúmr, from Proto-Germanic *rūmaz(roomy, spacious, open).

Adjective[edit]

rum

  1. wide, spacious
Usage notes[edit]

Only used in the expressions:

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse rúm, from Proto-Germanic *rūmą(room, open space).

Noun[edit]

rum n (singular definite rummet, plural indefinite rum)

  1. room (part of a building)
  2. compartment
  3. space
  4. plural indefinite of rum
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See rumme(to contain, hold).

Verb[edit]

rum

  1. imperative of rumme

Fiji Hindi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English room.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum

  1. room

References[edit]


Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Rum.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈrum]
  • Hyphenation: rum

Noun[edit]

rum ‎(plural rumok)

  1. rum (a distilled spirit)

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative rum rumok
accusative rumot rumokat
dative rumnak rumoknak
instrumental rummal rumokkal
causal-final rumért rumokért
translative rummá rumokká
terminative rumig rumokig
essive-formal rumként rumokként
essive-modal
inessive rumban rumokban
superessive rumon rumokon
adessive rumnál rumoknál
illative rumba rumokba
sublative rumra rumokra
allative rumhoz rumokhoz
elative rumból rumokból
delative rumról rumokról
ablative rumtól rumoktól
Possessive forms of rum
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. rumom rumjaim
2nd person sing. rumod rumjaid
3rd person sing. rumja rumjai
1st person plural rumunk rumjaink
2nd person plural rumotok rumjaitok
3rd person plural rumjuk rumjaik

Derived terms[edit]

(Compound words):

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gábor Zaicz, Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete, Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, ISBN 963 7094 01 6

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English rum.

Noun[edit]

rum m ‎(genitive singular rum, nominative plural rumanna)

  1. rum

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English rum.

Noun[edit]

rum m ‎(invariable)

  1. rum (distilled spirit)

Derived terms[edit]


Kashubian[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum m

  1. space

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

rum

  1. rafsi of runme.

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Low German Ruum, from Old Saxon rūm, from Proto-Germanic *rūmą.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum m ‎(diminutive rumk)

  1. room, space

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *rūmaz. Cognate with Old Saxon rūm, Dutch ruim, Old High German rūm, Old Norse rúmr, Gothic 𐍂𐌿𐌼𐍃(rums).

Adjective[edit]

rūm

  1. spacious, roomy, open
    Ðis rume land‎ ― the wide world (Cædmon’s Metrical Paraphrase)
  2. free, unrestricted
  3. expansive, generous
  4. long, extended (of time)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *rūmą, from Proto-Indo-European *rowǝ-. Cognate with Old Saxon rūm (Low German Ruum, Dutch ruim, Old High German rūm (German Raum), Old Norse rūm (Danish and Swedish rum), Gothic 𐍂𐌿𐌼𐍃(rūms).

Noun[edit]

rūm n

  1. space; a room
  2. a space of time, an interval; an opportunity
    Rum wæs to nimanne londbuendum on ðam laðestan...‎ ― It was an opportunity for the land-dwellers to seize from the most hated ones... (Judith)
Descendants[edit]

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum m inan

  1. rum

Declension[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum m (plural runs)

  1. rum

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse rúm, from Proto-Germanic *rūmą, from Proto-Indo-European *rowǝ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum n

  1. room; part of a building.
    Jag vill ha en lägenhet med två rum
    I want a flat with two rooms
  2. room; empty, available space; enough space
    Har du rum i din väska så att du kan lägga ner min bok också?
    Do you have enough space in your bag so that you could put my book too in it?
  3. (mathematics) space
    Linjärt rum
    Linear space

Declension[edit]

Inflection of rum 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative rum rummet rum rummen
Genitive rums rummets rums rummens

Related terms[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English room.

Noun[edit]

rum

  1. room

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rum

  1. safflower