bus

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
A bus (motor vehicle).

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of omnibus, from French omnibus from Latin omnibus (for all, for everybody); dative plural of omnis (all). The electrical sense is derived from figurative application of the automotive sense.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus (plural buses or busses)

  1. (automotive) A motor vehicle for transporting large numbers of people along roads.
  2. An electrical conductor or interface serving as a common connection for two or more circuits or components.
  3. (medical industry, slang) An ambulance.

Synonyms[edit]

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

See bus/translations § Noun.

Verb[edit]

bus (third-person singular simple present busses or buses, present participle bussing or busing, simple past and past participle bussed or bused)

  1. (transitive, automotive, transport) To transport via a motor bus.
  2. (transitive, automotive, transport, chiefly US) To transport students to school, often to a more distant school for the purposes of achieving racial integration.
    • 1966, Phil Ochs, "Love Me, I'm a Liberal", Phils Ochs in Concert.
      But if you ask me to bus my children / I hope the cops take down your name
    • 2008, Ashley R. Holm, Racial Differences in Student Engagement and Attainment: A Study of Topeka High School, 1939--1984, ProQuest →ISBN, page 23
      ...to strike down Detroit's federal court order to bus students across school district lines for the purpose of desegregation and therefore nullify many busing programs throughout the country.
  3. (intransitive, automotive, transport) To travel by bus.
  4. (transitive, US, food service) To clear meal remains from.
    He bussed tables as the restaurant emptied out.
  5. (intransitive, US, food service) To work at clearing the remains of meals from tables or counters; to work as a busboy.
    He’s been bussing for minimum wage.

Usage notes[edit]

The Canadian Oxford Dictionary only presents the spellings buses, busing, and bused, implying that these are the predominant forms in Canada.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See bus/translations § Verb.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus (plural busse, diminutive bussie)

  1. (automotive) bus

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Cognate to Spanish buso (underwater snail) and Portuguese búzio (underwater snail), from Latin būcina (horn).

Noun[edit]

bus m or f (plural bussos)

  1. diver

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Old Norse buza (big wide ship).

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural bussos)

  1. (archaic) A large sailing ship used in the 12th and 13th centuries, broad of beam and with two or three masts.

Etymology 3[edit]

Probably from Persian بوس(bus, kiss).

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural busos)

  1. (archaic) flattery
Usage notes[edit]

Only found in the phrase fer lo bus (to kiss up).

Etymology 4[edit]

Clipping of autobús.

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural busos)

  1. bus (vehicle)

Etymology 5[edit]

Borrowed from English bus.

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural busos)

  1. bus (electrical connector)

Cimbrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian bus, a clipping of omnibus, from French omnibus.

Noun[edit]

bus m

  1. (Luserna) bus (vehicle)
    Benn rifta dar bus?What time does the bus come?

References[edit]

  • “bus” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m

  1. bus (motor vehicle for transporting large numbers of people along roads)

Synonyms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortening of omnibus, from French omnibus, from Latin omnibus (for all), dative plural of omnis (all).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus c (singular definite bussen, plural indefinite busser)

  1. bus, coach

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortening of omnibus, from Latin omnibus (for everything/all); dative plural of omnis (all).

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural bussen, diminutive busje n)

  1. (transport) bus, omnibus (vehicle)
  2. (transport, in diminutive) minibus, minivan
  3. bus (electrical conductor)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch busse, from Old Dutch *bussa, from Proto-Germanic *buhsijǭ, *buhsuz. Compare German Büchse and English box.

Noun[edit]

bus f (plural bussen, diminutive busje n)

  1. container, box, tin
  2. bushing
  3. (chiefly historical) one of a variety of early modern firearms, such as flintlock and matchlock guns
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Indonesian: bis (letterbox, mailbox)

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry. Related to etymology 2.

Verb[edit]

bus

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bussen
  2. imperative of bussen

French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping of omnibus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m or f (plural bus)

  1. bus
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inflected forms.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bus

  1. first-person singular past historic of boire
  2. second-person singular past historic of boire

Verb[edit]

bus m pl

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of boire

Further reading[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch bus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bus/
  • Hyphenation: bus

Noun[edit]

bus (plural, first-person possessive busku, second-person possessive busmu, third-person possessive busnya)

  1. bus

Alternative forms[edit]

  • bis (nonstandard)

Etymology 2[edit]

Onomatopoeic, related to hembus

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /bus/
  • Hyphenation: bus

Noun[edit]

bus (plural, first-person possessive busku, second-person possessive busmu, third-person possessive busnya)

  1. wind

Further reading[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English bus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m (genitive singular bus, nominative plural busanna)

  1. bus
  2. (computing) bus

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bus bhus mbus
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "bus" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • bus” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • Entries containing “bus” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.

Lithuanian[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bùs

  1. third-person singular future of būti
  2. third-person plural future of būti
  3. third-person singular future of busti
  4. third-person plural future of busti

Lombard[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m

  1. hole

Middle Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *bussus, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew- (to swell, bulge).

Noun[edit]

bus (gender unknown)

  1. (rare, poetic) lip

Descendants[edit]

  • Scottish Gaelic: bus

References[edit]


Norman[edit]

Verb[edit]

bus

  1. first-person singular preterite of baithe

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contraction of autobus, borrowed from English bus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m anim (diminutive busik)

  1. (colloquial) bus

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • bus in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bus in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romagnol[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m

  1. hole
    • September 2012, Daniela Cortesi, Bônanòta in la Ludla, il Papiro, page 15:
      un sorg e’ cor in priscia int e’ su bus.
      a mouse runs hastily towards its hole.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from English bus.

Noun[edit]

bus m (genitive singular bus, plural busaichean)

  1. bus

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Irish bus.

Noun[edit]

bus m (genitive singular buis, plural buis or busan)

  1. mouth
    Synonym: beul
  2. pout (facial expression)

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
bus bhus
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Somali[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus ?

  1. dust

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortening of autobús or borrowed from English bus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus m (plural buses)

  1. Clipping of autobús; bus
    Synonym: autobús

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb busa (to do mischief).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus n (uncountable)

  1. very innocent mischief, prank
    Trick or Treat is often translated with Bus eller godis
  2. general noise or trouble made by gangs of youths

Declension[edit]

Declension of bus 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative bus buset
Genitive bus busets

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English bus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bus

  1. bus (vehicle)

Related terms[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English bush.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

bus

  1. bush (remote rural areas)
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 1:25:
      God i kamapim ol kain kain animal bilong ples na ol bikpela na liklik animal bilong bus. God i lukim olgeta dispela samting i gutpela, na em i amamas.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Derived terms[edit]


West Flemish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch busch, variant of bosch, from Old Dutch *busc, from Proto-Germanic *buskaz.

Noun[edit]

bus n

  1. forest

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “Same as Dutch "bus", but is it derived from that or shortened from "omnibus" independently?”)

Noun[edit]

bus m

  1. bus