mar

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Contents

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English merren, from Old English mierran ‎(to mar, disturb, confuse; scatter, squander, waste; upset, hinder, obstruct; err), from Proto-Germanic *marzijaną ‎(to disturb, hinder), from Proto-Indo-European *mers- ‎(to annoy, disturb, neglect, forget, ignore). Cognate with Scots mer, mar ‎(to obstruct, impede, spoil, ruin), Dutch marren ‎(to push along, delay, hinder), German dialectal merren ‎(to entangle), Icelandic merja ‎(to bruise, crush), Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐍂𐌶𐌾𐌰𐌽 ‎(marzjan, to annoy, bother, disturb, offend), Lithuanian miršti ‎(to forget, lose, become oblivious, die), Armenian մոռանալ ‎(moṙanal, to forget, fail).

Verb[edit]

mar ‎(third-person singular simple present mars, present participle marring, simple past and past participle marred)

  1. To spoil, to damage.
    His performance at the Grammys was marred when a microphone fell on the piano’s strings.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker under Creed Church neer Aldgate; and by Robert Boulter at the Turks Head in Bishopsgate-street; and Matthias Walker, under St. Dunstons Church in Fleet-street, OCLC 767532218:
      Ire, envy, and despair / Marred all his borrowed visage, and betrayed / Him counterfeit.
    • 1700, Homer; John Dryden, The First Book of Homer's Ilias, in Fables Ancient and Modern; Translated into Verse, from Homer, Ovid, Boccace, & Chaucer: With Original Poems, London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, within Gray's Inn Gate next Gray's Inn Lane, OCLC 228732415; republished London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, at Shakespear's Head over-against Katherine-street in the Strand, 1713, OCLC 642439250, page 255:
      Mother, tho' wiſe your ſelf, my Counsel weigh; / 'Tis much unſafe my Sire to disobey; / Not only you provoke him to your Coſt, / But Mirth is marr'd, and the good Chear is loſt.
    • 1826, Adam Clarke, The Holy Bible, Containing the Old and New Testaments: The Text Printed from the Most Correct Copies of the Present Authorized Translation, including the Marginal Readings and Parallel Texts. With a Commentary and Critical Notes. Designed as a Help to a Better Understanding of the Sacred Writings, volume IV, Royal Octavo Stereotype edition, New York, N.Y.: Published by N. Bangs and J. Emory, for the Methodist Episcopal Church, at the Conference Office, 13, Crosby-Street, Jeremiah 18:3–4, page 53:
      [] I went down to the potter's house, and, behold, he wrought a work on the wheels. And the vessel that he made of clay was marred in the hand of the potter: so he made it again another vessel, as seemed good to the potter to make it.
    • 1856, Jabez Burns, “The Heralds of Mercy”, in Cyclopedia of Sermons: Containing Sketches of Sermons on the Parables and Miracles of Christ, on Christian Missions, on Scripture Characters and Incidents; on Subjects Appropriate for the Sick Room, Family Reading and Village Worship and some Special Occasions, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, 346 & 348 Broadway, OCLC 692530910, page 253:
      Sin defiles the soul; it mars its beauty, impairs its health and vigor. It perverts its powers, and deranges all its dignified energies and attributes.
    • 2000, Vanessa Gunther, “The Indian Giver”, in Gordon Morris Bakken, editor, Law in the Western United States (Legal History of North America; 6), Norman, Okla.: University of Oklahoma Press, ISBN 978-0-8061-3215-0, page 271:
      The Court's ability to reinterpret the words in the treaty that do not appeal to it mars its logic, and demeans other words there, most significantly the solemnity of the United States oath.
    • 2007, Zeno W. Wicks, Jr.; Frank N. Jones; S. Peter Pappas; Douglas A. Wicks, Organic Coatings: Science and Technology, 3rd edition, Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley-Interscience, ISBN 978-0-471-69806-7, pages 85 and 210:
      [page 85] Mar resistance is related to abrasion resistance, but there is an important difference. Abrasion may go deeply into the coating, whereas marring is usually a near-surface phenomenon; mars less than 0.5 μm deep can degrade appearance. [] [page 210] Eventually, sufficient resin can accumulate to drip down on products going through the ovens, marring their finish.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See mere.

Noun[edit]

mar ‎(plural mars)

  1. A small lake.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mar

  1. (colloquial) Alternative form of maar

Conjunction[edit]

mar

  1. (colloquial) Alternative form of maar

Asturian[edit]

Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia ast

Noun[edit]

mar m, f ‎(plural mares)

  1. sea (body of water)

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare ‎(sea), from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (standard) IPA(key): /mar/, /maɾ/
  • Rhymes: -aɾ
  • (Balearic Islands) IPA(key): /ma/
  • Homophones: ma,
  • Rhymes: -a(ɾ)
  • Hyphenation: mar

Noun[edit]

mar m, f ‎(plural mars)

  1. sea

Derived terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

mar m ‎(plural mares)

  1. sea
  2. (figuratively) sea; vast number or quantity

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Uralic *mura (*murɜ) ‎(bit, crumb; crumble, crack). [1][2]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mar

  1. (transitive) to bite

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

(With verbal prefixes):

References[edit]

  1. ^ Entry #566 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  2. ^ Gábor Zaicz, Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete, Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, ISBN 963 7094 01 6

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

mar n ‎(genitive singular mars, no plural)

  1. bruise, contusion

Declension[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

mar ‎(plural mares)

  1. sea

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish immar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

mar

  1. because
  2. as

Derived terms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

mar ‎(plus dative, triggers lenition)

  1. like

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  • immar” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • "mar" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mar m

  1. (form of mare used in poetry and in names of some seas) sea

Derived terms[edit]


Kurdish[edit]

Noun[edit]

mar m

  1. snake
  2. marriage

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

mar

  1. rafsi of manri.

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic مَرَّ ‎(marra, to pass).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mar (imperfect imur)

  1. go

Conjugation[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare.

Noun[edit]

mar f (plural mars)

  1. sea (large body of water)

Old French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mar

  1. Alternative form of mare

Adverb[edit]

mar

  1. Alternative form of mare

Old Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare ‎(sea), from Proto-Indo-European *móri ‎(sea).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mar m

  1. sea
Descendants[edit]
edit
  • Galician: mar
  • Portuguese: mar
    • Kabuverdianu: már

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

mar

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese mar ‎(sea), from Latin mare ‎(sea), from Proto-Indo-European *móri ‎(sea).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mar m (plural mares)

  1. sea
  2. (figuratively) a multitude; a great amount or number of things
Related terms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mar (comparative mais mar superlative o mais mar)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of mal, representing Caipira Portuguese.

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Noun 1[edit]

mar f (plural mars)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) sea

Noun 2[edit]

mar m (plural mars)

  1. (Vallader) sea

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Preposition[edit]

mar

  1. as
  2. like

Usage notes[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *marъ

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mȃr m ‎(Cyrillic spelling ма̑р)

  1. (rare) diligence
  2. (rare) eagerness, zeal

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Somali[edit]

Verb[edit]

mar

  1. to pass, to proceed

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare ‎(sea), from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaɾ/
  • Hyphenation: mar

Noun[edit]

mar m, f ‎(plural mares)

  1. sea
    • 2008, Cécile Corbel (lyrics and music), “En la mar [In the Middle of the Sea]” (song, in Spanish), in Songbook vol. 2 (album, CD), Brittany: Keltia Musique, performed by Cécile Corbel:
      En la mar hay una torre
      En la torre una ventana
      En la ventana hay una hija
      Que a los marineros ama.
      In the middle of the sea there's a tower
      In the tower there's window
      At the window there's a maiden
      Who loves the sailors.
  2. seaside
  3. (selenology) lunar mare

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]
edit

Swedish[edit]

Abbreviation[edit]

mar

  1. March; Abbreviation of mars.

See also[edit]


Torres Strait Creole[edit]

Noun[edit]

mar

  1. (western dialect) a person's shadow

Synonyms[edit]

  • mari (eastern dialect)

Venetian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mare, from Proto-Indo-European *móri. Compare Italian mare.

Noun[edit]

mar m (plural mari)

  1. sea

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Frisian mere, from Proto-Germanic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri. Compare English mere, Dutch meer, Low German Meer, meer, German Meer.

Noun[edit]

mar c

  1. lake

Etymology 2[edit]

Adverb[edit]

mar

  1. only, solely

Conjunction[edit]

mar

  1. but

Zazaki[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: mar

Noun[edit]

mar

  1. (zoology) snake