mars

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Mars, MARS, marš, Марс, and марс

English[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 Mars (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

mars

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of mar

Noun[edit]

mars

  1. plural of mar

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Latin martius.

Noun[edit]

mars m

  1. March

Atong (India)[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English March.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mars (Bengali script মার্স)

  1. March

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Azerbaijani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Persian مارس(mârs).

Noun[edit]

mars (definite accusative marsı, plural marslar)

  1. (backgammon) gammon (a game in which one player removes all his checkers before his opponent can remove any, and counted as a double win)
    Marsdan qaçan oyunu aparar!
    One who [manages to] escape the gammon will win the game!

Declension[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Noun[edit]

mars

  1. plural of mar

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

mars m (plural marsen, diminutive marsje n)

  1. march
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Indonesian: mars

Interjection[edit]

mars

  1. march! (military command)
    Voorwaarts, mars!Forward, march!

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

mars f (plural marsen, diminutive marsje n)

  1. basket (usually worn on the back like a rucksack)
  2. (nautical) the platform at the top of the lower mast of a sailing ship.
Related terms[edit]

Faroese[edit]

Noun[edit]

mars m

  1. March (month of the Gregorian calendar)

See also[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably borrowed from German marsch!, French marche!, or less likely, an irregular imperative form of marssia (compare seis < seistä).

Interjection[edit]

mars!

  1. march! (military command)

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French mars, from Latin (mensis) mārtius.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mars m (plural mars)

  1. March (month)

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin mārtiī, genitive singular of mārtius (relating to Mars), from Mārs (Mars, Roman god of war and agriculture).

Noun[edit]

mars m (invariable, no plural)

  1. March
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Danish march (march), from French marche (walk, march), of Frankish origin, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ- (boundary, edge).

Noun[edit]

mars m (genitive singular mars, nominative plural marsar)

  1. march (musical piece such as is played while marching)
  2. march (type of dance)
Declension[edit]

Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch mars, from Middle French marcher (to march, walk), from Old French marchier (to stride, to march, to trample), from Frankish *markōn (to mark, mark out, to press with the foot), from Proto-Germanic *markōną (area, region, edge, rim, border), akin to Persian مرز(marz), from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ- (edge, boundary).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈmars]
  • Hyphenation: mars

Noun[edit]

mars (plural mars-mars, first-person possessive marsku, second-person possessive marsmu, third-person possessive marsnya)

  1. march:
    1. a formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.
    2. any song in the genre of music written for marching.

Further reading[edit]


Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French mars

Noun[edit]

mars

  1. March

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Mars, borrowed from Latin Mars. So named because of its astrological association with the planet.

Noun[edit]

mars (uncountable)

  1. (rare) The blackish, magnetic metal susceptible to rust; iron.
    • 1475, The Book of Quintessence.
      In þat wiyn or watir ȝe quenche mars manye tymes.

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mārtius (month of the god Mars).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mars m (indeclinable)

  1. March (third month of the Gregorian calendar)

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mārtius (month of the god Mars).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mars m (indeclinable)

  1. March (third month)

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin mārtius.

Noun[edit]

mars m (oblique plural mars, nominative singular mars, nominative plural mars)

  1. March (month)
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

see marc

Noun[edit]

mars m

  1. oblique plural of marc
  2. nominative singular of marc

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader) marz

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mārtius (of March).

Proper noun[edit]

mars m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) March

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mars c

  1. March (month)

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Tashelhit[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin mārtius.

Noun[edit]

mars

  1. March (month)