marcher

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle English marche; from Anglo-Norman and Old French. Akin to Old English germearc, Gothic marka (marka, boundary).[1][2]

Noun[edit]

marcher (plural marchers)

  1. (now historical) An inhabitant of a march (border country); specifically, a marcher lord. [from 14th c.]
  2. (now historical) A border territory, a march (now only in (attributive) use). [from 15th c.]
    • 2013, Simon Winder, Danubia, Picador 2014, p. 42:
      Here is a scene of the marcher state of which they were margraves being turned into a duchy under Henry II Jasomirgott, who has made his capital at Vienna.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

march +‎ -er.

Noun[edit]

marcher (plural marchers)

  1. One who marches; one who participates in a march.
Derived terms[edit]

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French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French, from Old French marchier, from Frankish *markōn, from Proto-Germanic, from Proto-Indo-European *merg-, *marǵ- (edge, boundary, border). Cf. also marquer.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /maʁ.ʃe/
  • (file)

Verb[edit]

marcher

  1. to walk
    Il marche au milieu de la rue. — He is walking in the middle of the street
  2. to travel; to move; to march
  3. to work, to function
    Comment ça marche ? — How's it work?
    Cet appareil ne marche plus. — This device quit working.
  4. to step
  5. to cooperate
    Je ne marche plus. — I am no longer in.
  6. to believe
    Il marche. — He believes my joke.
    Il m'a fait marcher. — He took me for a ride.

Conjugation[edit]

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Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old French marchier.

Verb[edit]

marcher

  1. to walk (travel on foot)

Conjugation[edit]

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.