march

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: March, Märch, and marc'h

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English marchen, from Middle French marcher (to march, walk), from Old French marchier (to stride, to march, to trample), from Frankish *markōn (to mark, mark out, to press with the foot), from Proto-Germanic *markōną (area, region, edge, rim, border), akin to Persian مرز(marz), from Proto-Indo-European *mereg- (edge, boundary). Akin to Old English mearc, ġemearc (mark, boundary). Compare mark, from Old English mearcian.

Noun[edit]

march (plural marches)

  1. A formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.
  2. A political rally or parade
    Synonyms: protest, parade, rally
  3. Any song in the genre of music written for marching (see Wikipedia's article on this type of music)
  4. Steady forward movement or progression.
    the march of time
    Synonyms: process, advancement, progression
  5. (euchre) The feat of taking all the tricks of a hand.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

march (third-person singular simple present marches, present participle marching, simple past and past participle marched)

  1. (intransitive) To walk with long, regular strides, as a soldier does.
  2. (transitive) To cause someone to walk somewhere.
    • 1967, Sleigh, Barbara, Jessamy, 1993 edition, Sevenoaks, Kent: Bloomsbury, →ISBN, page 84:
      The old man heaved himself from the chair, seized Jessamy by her pinafore frill and marched her to the house.
  3. To go to war; to make military advances.
  4. (figuratively) To make steady progress.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English marche (tract of land along a country's border), from Old French marche (boundary, frontier), from Frankish *marka, from Proto-Germanic *markō, from Proto-Indo-European *mereg- (edge, boundary).

Noun[edit]

march (plural marches)

  1. (now archaic, historical) A border region, especially one originally set up to defend a boundary.
    Synonyms: frontier, marchland
  2. (historical) A region at a frontier governed by a marquess.
  3. Any of various territories with similar meanings or etymologies in their native languages.
    Synonyms: county palatinate, county palatine
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, IV:
      Juan's companion was a Romagnole, / But bred within the March of old Ancona [].
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

march (third-person singular simple present marches, present participle marching, simple past and past participle marched)

  1. (intransitive) To have common borders or frontiers
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English merche, from Old English merce, Old Saxon merka (celery, smallage). Compare Middle Low German merk, Old High German merc. Possibly also related to obsolete or regional more (carrot or parsnip),[1] from Proto-Indo-European *mork- (edible herb, tuber).

Noun[edit]

march (plural marches)

  1. (obsolete) Smallage.
Synonyms[edit]
See also[edit]
  • stanmarch (Smyrnium olusatrum, alexanders)
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ march, n.1.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, September 2000.

Anagrams[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *marx, from Proto-Celtic *markos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

march m (plural meirch)

  1. horse, steed, stallion

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
march farch unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.