march

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: March, Märch, and marc'h

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English marchen, from Middle French marcher (to march, walk), from Old French marchier (to stride, to march, to trample), from Frankish *markōn (to mark, mark out, to press with the foot), from Proto-Germanic *markōną (area, region, edge, rim, border), akin to Persianمرز(marz), from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ- (edge, boundary). Akin to Old English mearc, ġemearc (mark, boundary). Compare mark, from Old English mearcian.

Noun[edit]

march (plural marches)

Soldiers marching in the UK.
  1. A formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.
  2. A political rally or parade
    Synonyms: protest, parade, rally
  3. Any song in the genre of music written for marching (see Wikipedia's article on this type of music)
  4. Steady forward movement or progression.
    Synonyms: process, advancement, progression
    the march of time
  5. (euchre) The feat of taking all the tricks of a hand.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

march (third-person singular simple present marches, present participle marching, simple past and past participle marched)

  1. (intransitive) To walk with long, regular strides, as a soldier does.
  2. (transitive) To cause someone to walk somewhere.
    • 1967, Barbara Sleigh, Jessamy, Sevenoaks, Kent: Bloomsbury, published 1993, →ISBN, page 84:
      The old man heaved himself from the chair, seized Jessamy by her pinafore frill and marched her to the house.
  3. To go to war; to make military advances.
  4. (figurative) To make steady progress.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English marche (tract of land along a country's border), from Old French marche (boundary, frontier), from Frankish *marku, from Proto-Germanic *markō, from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ- (edge, boundary).

Noun[edit]

march (plural marches)

  1. (now archaic, historical) A border region, especially one originally set up to defend a boundary.
    Synonyms: frontier, marchland, borderland
  2. (historical) A region at a frontier governed by a marquess.
  3. Any of various territories with similar meanings or etymologies in their native languages.
    Synonyms: county palatinate, county palatine
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, section IV:
      Juan's companion was a Romagnole, / But bred within the March of old Ancona [].
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

march (third-person singular simple present marches, present participle marching, simple past and past participle marched)

  1. (intransitive) To have common borders or frontiers
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English merche, from Old English merċe, mereċe, from Proto-West Germanic *marik, from Proto-Indo-European *móri (sea). Cognate Middle Low German merk, Old High German merc, Old Norse merki (celery). Compare also obsolete or regional more (carrot or parsnip),[1] from Proto-Indo-European *mork- (edible herb, tuber).

Noun[edit]

march (plural marches)

  1. (obsolete) Smallage.
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ march, n.1.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, September 2000.

Anagrams[edit]

Atong (India)[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English March.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

march (Bengali script মার্চ)

  1. March

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French marche, derived from the verb marcher (to march). The interjection is borrowed from the French imperative of this verb.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

march c (singular definite marchen, plural indefinite marcher)

  1. march

Interjection[edit]

march

  1. march! (an order)

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh march, from Proto-Brythonic *marx, from Proto-Celtic *markos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

march m (plural meirch)

  1. horse, steed, stallion

Derived terms[edit]

Compounds[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
march farch unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.