gang

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See also: Gang, gàng, gāng, Gāng, găng, gäng, gång, and gǎng

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English gangen, from Old English gangan ‎(to go, walk, turn out), from Proto-Germanic *ganganą ‎(to go, walk), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- ‎(to step, walk). Cognate with Scots gang ‎(to go on foot, walk), Swedish gånga ‎(to walk, go), Faroese ganga ‎(to walk), Icelandic ganga ‎(to walk, go). Ultimately: related to etym. 2, see below.

Verb[edit]

gang ‎(third-person singular simple present gangs, present participle ganging, simple past and past participle ganged)

  1. (intransitive, chiefly Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To go; walk; proceed.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English gang, from Old English gang ‎(a journey; way; passage), from Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- ‎(to step; stride). Cognate with Dutch gang, German Gang, Icelandic gangur, Norwegian gang ("hallway"), Old Norse gangr (passage, hallway), Swedish gång.

Noun[edit]

gang ‎(plural gangs)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal) A going, journey; a course, path, track.
    • 1840, Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Woodnotes I.3":
      In unploughed Maine he sought the lumberers’ gang / Where from a hundred lakes young rivers sprang
    • 1869, Papa André, Once a Week, page 418/1:
      That week was also called the Gang Week, from the Saxon ganger, to go; and the Rogation days were termed the Gang Days.
    • 1895, Frederick Tupper Jr., Anglo-Saxon Dæg-Mæl, Modern Language Association of America, page 229:
      Neither Marshall nor Bouterwek makes clear the connection existing between the Gang-days and the Major and Minor Litanies.
  2. (obsolete) An outhouse: an outbuilding used as a lavatory.
    • c. 1000, Aelfric, Homilies, Vol. I, page 290:
      Þaða he to gange com.
  3. A number going in company; a number of friends or persons associated for a particular purpose.
    the Gashouse Gang
    The gang from our office is going out for drinks Friday night.
  4. A group of laborers under one foreman; a squad.
    a gang of sailors; a railroad gang.
  5. (US) A criminal group with a common cultural background and identifying features, often associated with a particular section of a city.
    a youth gang; a neighborhood gang; motorcycle gang.
  6. A group of criminals or alleged criminals who band together for mutual protection and profit, or a group of politicians united in furtherance of a political goal.
    the Winter Hill gang; the Gang of Four.
    Not all members of the Gang of Six are consistent in their opposition to filibuster.
  7. (US) A chain gang.
  8. A combination of similar tools or implements arranged so as, by acting together, to save time or labor; a set.
    a gang of saws; a gang of plows.
  9. A set; all required for an outfit.
    a new gang of stays.
  10. (electrics) A number of switches or other electrical devices wired into one unit and covered by one faceplate.
    an outlet gang box; a double gang switch.
  11. (electrics) A group of wires attached as a bundle.
    a gang of wires
    Do a drop for the telephone gang, then another drop for the internet gang, both through the ceiling of the wiring closet.
  12. (mining) The mineral substance which encloses a vein; a matrix; a gangue.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

gang ‎(third-person singular simple present gangs, present participle ganging, simple past and past participle ganged)

  1. (intransitive) To band together as a group or gang.
    "Let's gang up on them."
  2. (transitive) to attach similar items together to form a larger unit.
    • 1999 May, Rosario Capotosto, “Building a Bookcase”, in Popular Mechanics:
      When cutting the back cleats with the T-guide, first gang them together so all the marks on one side align.
    • 2011, Corky Binggeli, Interior Graphic Standards: Student Edition, ISBN 1118099354, page 317:
      The chairs are usually ganged together using a variety of ganging or locking mechanisms to create rows and prevent the chairs from moving out of position.

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See gan.

Verb[edit]

gang ‎(second-person singular simple present gangst)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of gan.

Etymology 4[edit]

Shortening of gangbang

Verb[edit]

gang ‎(third-person singular simple present gangs, present participle ganging, simple past and past participle ganged)

  1. Synonym of gangbang: to have sex with a single partner as a gang.
    • Richard Allen, Skinhead, page 80:
    • ...there's a thin line to tread to avoid fights or getting "ganged" when rejecting the sexual overtures of incarcerated women.

References[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gang.

Noun[edit]

gang ‎(plural gange)

  1. a passageway, alley

Balinese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gang ‎(passageway, alley).

Noun[edit]

gang

  1. alleyway, alley, narrow street. A narrow pathway bound by walls on both sides

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Danish gang, from Old Norse gangr, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- ‎(stride, step).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang c (singular definite gangen, plural indefinite gange)

  1. The act of walking, a walk.
  2. An intended amount of something, especially time.
  3. A way or path to walk on.
  4. A person's business or activity.
  5. One of the few cases where something takes place, a rare event.
  6. A line or closed space that can be bypassed, usually by foot.
  7. A room giving access to another room.
  8. A narrow road built for pedestrians, usually in a public park or facility.
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See gange.

Verb[edit]

gang

  1. imperative of gange

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ganc, from Old Dutch gank, gang, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz.

Noun[edit]

gang m ‎(plural gangen, diminutive gangetje n)

  1. passageway, alley
  2. gait
  3. journey
  4. hallway, corridor
  5. course
  6. walk, way of stepping, running etc.

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from English gang.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang m ‎(plural gangs)

  1. gang, group of ill-doers

External links[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gang ‎(passageway, alley).

Noun[edit]

gang

  1. alleyway, alley, narrow street. A narrow pathway bound by walls on both sides
    gang buntu — dead-end alley
  2. an organized crime group
  3. a group of people with distinct identity, such as high school mates. See also geng

Verb[edit]

gang

  1. to form a gang group

Mandarin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of gāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of gǎng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of gàng.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gangr, also related to .

Noun[edit]

gang m ‎(definite singular gangen, indefinite plural ganger, definite plural gangene)

  1. hall, hallway
    Sett fra deg skoene i gangen.
    Leave your shoes in the hallway.
  2. passage, corridor
    I enden av den lange gangen er klasserommet.
    The classroom is at the end of the long corridor.
  3. aisle
  4. walk, path
  5. walk, walking, going
  6. walk, gait
    Gangen hans er litt merkelig.
    His gait is a bit weird
  7. working, running, action, movement, motion, operation
  8. course; passage
  9. course; march
  10. time
    Vi vant fem ganger på rad!
    We won five times in a row!
  11. plot, action
    Historiens gang var litt komplisert.
    The plot of the story was somewhat complicated.
  12. (mining) dike, lode
  13. vein
  14. (anatomy) duct

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gangr, also related to .

Noun[edit]

gang m ‎(definite singular gangen, indefinite plural gangar, definite plural gangane)

  1. hall, hallway
    Sett frå deg skorne i gangen.
    Leave your shoes in the hallway.
  2. passage, corridor
    I enden av den lange gangen er klasserommet.
    The class room is at the end of the long corridor.
  3. aisle
  4. walk, path
  5. walk, walking, going
  6. walk, gait
    Gangen hans er litt merkeleg.
    His gait is a bit weird
  7. working, running, action, movement, motion, operation
  8. course; passage
  9. course; march
  10. plot, action
    Gangen i soga var litt komplisert.
    The plot of the story was somewhat complicated.
  11. (mining) dike, lode
  12. vein
  13. (anatomy) duct

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the verb gangan ‎(to go, walk, turn out), from Proto-Germanic *ganganą ‎(to go, walk), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- ‎(to step, walk).

Noun[edit]

gang m ‎(nominative plural gangas)

  1. going, journey, progress, track, footprint, flow, stream, way, passage, course, path
    Him tǽcean lífes weg and rihtne gang to heofonum. — To teach them life's way and the right path to heaven.
  2. a company of people
    Anastasius wæs geháten se mæssepreóst þe se bisceop tó fundode swá fǽrlíce mid gange . . . Se bisceop gewende mid his gebróðrum hám.
  3. drain, privy
    Ðonne him to gange lyst. — When he desires the privy.
  4. platform, stage, steps

Noun[edit]

gang n ‎(nominative plural gangas)

  1. occurrence; passage or lapse of time
    Geára gangum. — In the course of years.

Derived terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang m (Portugal) or f (Brazil) (plural gangs)

  1. Dated spelling of gangue.

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English gangan, Old Norse ganga, with inflected forms from gān (like English go).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gang ‎(third-person singular present gangs, present participle gaun, past gaed, past participle gaen)

  1. To go.
    And I will love thee still, my dear
    Till a’ the seas gang dry.