gang

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Gang, gàng, gāng, Gāng, găng, gäng, gång, and gǎng

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: găng, IPA(key): /ɡæŋ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋ

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English gangen, from Old English gangan (to go, walk, turn out), from Proto-Germanic *ganganą (to go, walk), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- (to step, walk). Cognate with Scots gang (to go on foot, walk), Swedish gånga (to walk, go), Faroese ganga (to walk), Icelandic ganga (to walk, go), Vedic Sanskrit जंहस् (jáṃhas). Ultimately: related to etym. 2, see below.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

gang (third-person singular simple present gangs, present participle ganging, simple past and past participle ganged)

  1. (intransitive, chiefly Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To go; walk; proceed.
    • 1772, Richard Cumberland, The Fashionable Lover. A Comedy. Act III
      (Colin alone) Ah, Colin, thou’rt a prodigal; a thriftless loon thou’st been, that cou’d na’ keep a little pelf to thysall when thou had’st got it; now thou may’st gang in this poor geer to thy live's end, and worse too for aught I can tell; ’faith, mon, ’twas a smeart little bysack of money thou hadst scrap’d together, an the best part of it had na’ being last amongst thy kinsfolk, in the Isles of Skey and Mull; muckle gude may it do the weams of them that ha’ it! There was Jamie MacGregor and Sawney MacNab, and the twa braw lads of Kinruddin, with old Charley MacDougall, my mother's first husband's second cousin: by my sol I cou’d na’ see such near relations, and gentlemen of sich auncient families gang upon bare feet, while I rode a horseback: I had been na’ true Scot, an I cou’d na’ ge’en a countryman a gude last upon occasion (as he is going out, Miss Aubrey enters.)
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English gang, from Old English gang (a journey; way; passage), from Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰongʰ-o-s, from *ǵʰengʰ- (to step; stride). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Gong, Dutch gang, German Gang, Norwegian gang, Swedish gång, Icelandic gangur, Vedic Sanskrit जंहस् (jáṃhas).

Noun[edit]

gang (plural gangs)

  1. A number going in company; a number of friends or persons associated for a particular purpose.
    the Gashouse Gang
    The gang from our office is going out for drinks Friday night.
  2. A group of laborers under one foreman; a squad.
    a gang of sailors; a railroad gang; a labor gang or pool.
  3. A criminal group with a common cultural background and identifying features, often associated with a particular section of a city.
    a youth gang; a neighborhood gang; motorcycle gang.
  4. A group of criminals or alleged criminals who band together for mutual protection and profit.
    The Winter Hill Gang was quite proficient at murdering rival mobsters in order to take over their rackets.
  5. A group of politicians united in furtherance of a political goal.
    The Gang of Four was led by Jiang Qing, the fourth wife of Mao Zedong.
    Not all members of the Gang of Six are consistent in their opposition to filibuster.
  6. (US) A chain gang.
  7. A combination of similar tools or implements arranged so as, by acting together, to save time or labor; a set.
    a gang of saws; a gang of plows; a gang drill; gang milling.
  8. A set; all required for an outfit.
    a new gang of stays.
  9. (electrics) A number of switches or other electrical devices wired into one unit and covered by one faceplate.
    an outlet gang box; a double gang switch.
  10. (electrics) A group of wires attached as a bundle.
    a gang of wires
    Do a drop for the telephone gang, then another drop for the Internet gang, both through the ceiling of the wiring closet.
  11. (now chiefly dialectal) A going, journey; a course, path, track.
    • 1840, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Woodnotes I.3:
      In unploughed Maine he sought the lumberers’ gang / Where from a hundred lakes young rivers sprang
    • 1869, Papa André, Once a Week, page 418/1:
      That week was also called the Gang Week, from the Saxon ganger, to go; and the Rogation days were termed the Gang Days.
    • 1895, Frederick Tupper Jr., Anglo-Saxon Dæg-Mæl, Modern Language Association of America, page 229:
      Neither Marshall nor Bouterwek makes clear the connection existing between the Gang-days and the Major and Minor Litanies.
  12. (obsolete) An outhouse: an outbuilding used as a lavatory.
    • c. 1000, Aelfric, Homilies, Vol. I, page 290:
      Þaða he to gange com.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
Descendants[edit]
  • Portuguese: gangue
  • Thai: แก๊ง (gɛ́ng)

Verb[edit]

gang (third-person singular simple present gangs, present participle ganging, simple past and past participle ganged)

  1. (transitive) To attach similar items together to form a larger unit.
    • 1981, United States. Department of Defense, Human Engineering Design Criteria for Military Systems (page 58)
      Volume controls may be ganged to mode switches to provide maximum output []
    • 1999 May, Rosario Capotosto, “Building a Bookcase”, in Popular Mechanics:
      When cutting the back cleats with the T-guide, first gang them together so all the marks on one side align.
    • 2011, Corky Binggeli, Interior Graphic Standards: Student Edition, →ISBN, page 317:
      The chairs are usually ganged together using a variety of ganging or locking mechanisms to create rows and prevent the chairs from moving out of position.
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See gan.

Verb[edit]

gang (second-person singular simple present gangst)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of gan.

Etymology 4[edit]

Shortening of gangbang.

Verb[edit]

gang (third-person singular simple present gangs, present participle ganging, simple past and past participle ganged)

  1. Synonym of gangbang: to have sex with a single partner as a gang.
    • 2015, Richard Allen, Skinhead, page 80:
      [] there's a thin line to tread to avoid fights or getting “ganged” when rejecting the sexual overtures of incarcerated women.

References[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang (countable and uncountable, plural gangs)

  1. (mining) Alternative form of gangue

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gang, from Middle Dutch ganc, from Old Dutch gank, gang, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang (plural gange)

  1. a passageway, alley

Alemannic German[edit]

Verb[edit]

gang

  1. second-person imperative singular of gaa

Balinese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch gang (passageway, alley).

Noun[edit]

gang

  1. alleyway, alley, narrow street. A narrow pathway bound by walls on both sides

Cebuano[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: gang

Etymology 1[edit]

From English gang.

Noun[edit]

gang

  1. a gang; a criminal group with a common cultural background and identifying features, often associated with a particular section of a city

Etymology 2[edit]

From langga, pangga. Compare lang.

Noun[edit]

gang

  1. a term of address for a beloved person; dear; sweetie

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:gang.


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Danish gang, from Old Norse gangr, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- (stride, step).

Noun[edit]

gang c (singular definite gangen, plural indefinite gange)

  1. the act of walking, a walk
  2. a time (an occurrence, an incidence)
    Hvor mange gange slog klokken?
    How many times did the bell toll?
  3. a way or path to walk on, either outdoors or indoors (a corridor)
Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See gange.

Verb[edit]

gang

  1. imperative of gange

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ganc, from Old Dutch gank, gang, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang m (plural gangen, diminutive gangetje n)

  1. passageway, alley
  2. gait, walk (person's manner of walking or stepping)
  3. journey
  4. hallway, corridor
  5. course

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English gang.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang m (plural gangs)

  1. gang, group of ill-doers

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Garo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

gang

  1. river

References[edit]

  • Burling, R. (2003) The Language of the Modhupur Mandi (Garo) Vol. II: The Lexicon[1], Bangladesh: University of Michigan, page 114

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

gang

  1. obsolete form of geh, second-person imperative singular of gehen

Hungarian[edit]

gang (three levels in the upper half of the photo)

Etymology[edit]

From German Gang.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang (plural gangok)

  1. (informal) hanging corridor (along the main walls of the courtyard of a tenement building, a major venue of socializing with neighbours)
    Synonym: (mainly as an architectural term) függőfolyosó

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative gang gangok
accusative gangot gangokat
dative gangnak gangoknak
instrumental ganggal gangokkal
causal-final gangért gangokért
translative ganggá gangokká
terminative gangig gangokig
essive-formal gangként gangokként
essive-modal
inessive gangban gangokban
superessive gangon gangokon
adessive gangnál gangoknál
illative gangba gangokba
sublative gangra gangokra
allative ganghoz gangokhoz
elative gangból gangokból
delative gangról gangokról
ablative gangtól gangoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
gangé gangoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
gangéi gangokéi
Possessive forms of gang
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. gangom gangjaim
2nd person sing. gangod gangjaid
3rd person sing. gangja gangjai
1st person plural gangunk gangjaink
2nd person plural gangotok gangjaitok
3rd person plural gangjuk gangjaik

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • gang in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch gang (passageway, alley), from Middle Dutch ganc, from Old Dutch gank, gang, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰongʰ-o-s, from *ǵʰengʰ- (to step; stride). Doublet of geng.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡaŋ/
  • Hyphenation: gang

Noun[edit]

gang (first-person possessive gangku, second-person possessive gangmu, third-person possessive gangnya)

  1. alleyway, alley, narrow street. A narrow pathway bound by walls on both sides
    gang buntudead-end alley
    Synonym: lorong

Descendants[edit]

  • Min Nan: (kàn, narrow street)[1]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang (first-person possessive gangku, second-person possessive gangmu, third-person possessive gangnya)

  1. Alternative spelling of geng (gang)

Verb[edit]

gang

  1. Alternative spelling of geng

References[edit]

  1. ^ Salmon Claudine. Malay (and Javanese) Loan-words in Chinese as a Mirror of Cultural Exchanges. In: Archipel, volume 78, 2009. pp. 181-208

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English gang.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang f (invariable, dated plural gangs)

  1. gang, specifically:
    1. (dated) A group of people.
    2. (dated) A group of laborers under one foreman.
    3. A criminal group.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • gang in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Mandarin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Romanization[edit]

gang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of gāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of gǎng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of gàng.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gangr, also related to .

Noun[edit]

gang m (definite singular gangen, indefinite plural ganger, definite plural gangene)

  1. hall, hallway
    Sett fra deg skoene i gangen.
    Leave your shoes in the hallway.
  2. passage, corridor
    I enden av den lange gangen er klasserommet.
    The classroom is at the end of the long corridor.
  3. aisle
  4. walk, path
  5. walk, walking, going
  6. walk, gait
    Gangen hans er litt merkelig.
    His gait is a bit weird
  7. working, running, action, movement, motion, operation
  8. course; passage
  9. course; march
  10. time
    Vi vant fem ganger på rad!
    We won five times in a row!
  11. plot, action
    Historiens gang var litt komplisert.
    The plot of the story was somewhat complicated.
  12. (mining) dike, lode
  13. vein
  14. (anatomy) duct

Derived terms[edit]


References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse gangr, also related to .

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang m (definite singular gangen, indefinite plural gangar, definite plural gangane)

  1. hall, hallway
    Sett frå deg skorne i gangen.
    Leave your shoes in the hallway.
  2. passage, corridor
    I enden av den lange gangen er klasserommet.
    The classroom is at the end of the long corridor.
  3. aisle
  4. walk, path
  5. walk, walking, going
  6. walk, gait
    Gangen hans er litt merkeleg.
    His gait is a bit weird
  7. working, running, action, movement, motion, operation
  8. course; passage
  9. course; march
  10. plot, action
    Gangen i soga var litt komplisert.
    The plot of the story was somewhat complicated.
  11. (mining) dike, lode
  12. vein
  13. (anatomy) duct

Derived terms[edit]


See also[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- (to step; stride). Related to Old English gangan (to go, walk).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɡɑnɡ/, [ɡɑŋɡ]

Noun[edit]

gang m

  1. going, walking
  2. path
  3. gait
  4. toilet

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *gangaz.

Noun[edit]

gang m (plural ganga)

  1. A path, course, way, journey; a going

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From English gang, from Middle English gang, from Old English gang, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰongʰ-o-s, from *ǵʰengʰ-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang m inan

  1. gang (criminal group with a common background)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • gang in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gang in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

gang m (Portugal) or f (Brazil) (plural gangs)

  1. Dated spelling of gangue.

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From German Gang

Noun[edit]

gang n (plural ganguri)

  1. passageway

Declension[edit]


Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English gangen, from Old English gangan, Old Norse ganga, with inflected forms from Old English gān (like English go).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

gang (third-person singular present gangs, present participle gaun, past gaed, past participle gaen)

  1. To go.
    And I will love thee still, my dear
    Till a’ the seas gang dry.

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English gang.

Noun[edit]

gang m (plural gangs)

  1. gang

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Vietic *c-kaːŋ (handspan).

Noun[edit]

gang

  1. a handspan

See also[edit]

Derived terms

Etymology 2[edit]

Vietnamese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia vi

From Proto-Vietic *t-kaːŋ, from Old Chinese (OC *C.kˤaŋ) (B-S) (SV: cương).

Noun[edit]

gang

  1. cast iron