vein

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: veîn

English[edit]

Veins of the arm (1)
Veins of a leaf (3)
Veins of a wing (4)
Veins within a rock (5.1)

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English veyne, borrowed from Anglo-Norman veine, from Latin vēna (a blood-vessel; vein; artery) of uncertain origin. See vēna for more. Displaced native Middle English edre, from Old English ǣdre (whence English edder).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vein (plural veins)

  1. (anatomy) A blood vessel that transports blood from the capillaries back to the heart.
  2. (in the plural) The entrails of a shrimp.
  3. (botany) In leaves, a thickened portion of the leaf containing the vascular bundle.
  4. (zoology) The nervure of an insect’s wing.
  5. A stripe or streak of a different colour or composition in materials such as wood, cheese, marble or other rocks.
    1. (geology) A sheetlike body of crystallized minerals within a rock.
  6. (figurative) A topic of discussion; a train of association, thoughts, emotions, etc.
    in the same vein
  7. (figurative) A style, tendency, or quality.
    The play is in a satirical vein.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Truth
      certain discoursing wits which are of the same veins
    • (Can we date this quote by Waller and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Invoke the Muses, and improve my vein.
  8. A fissure, cleft, or cavity, as in the earth or other substance.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

vein (third-person singular simple present veins, present participle veining, simple past and past participle veined)

  1. To mark with veins or a vein-like pattern.
    • 1853, Henry William Herbert, The Roman Traitor, Philadelphia: T.B. Peterson, Volume II, Chapter 18, p. 204,[1]
      [] as he ceased from that wild imprecation, a faint flash of lightning veined the remote horizon, and a low clap of thunder rumbled afar off, echoing among the hills []
    • 1920, Melville Davisson Post, The Sleuth of St. James’s Square, Chapter 14,[2]
      “We brought out our maps of the region and showed him the old routes and trails veining the whole of it. []

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

vein
Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Wein during the 19th century, ultimately from Latin vīnum. Doublet of viin.

Noun[edit]

vein (genitive veini, partitive veini)

  1. wine

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Verb[edit]

vein

  1. first-person singular indicative past of viedä

Anagrams[edit]


Gallo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French vin, from Latin vīnum, from Proto-Indo-European *wóyh₁nom.

Noun[edit]

vein m (plural veins)

  1. wine

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Back-formation from veina (to wail).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

vein n (genitive singular veins, nominative plural vein)

  1. wail, lament

Declension[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French vain, from Latin vānus (empty). The noun is derived from the adjective.

Adjective[edit]

vein

  1. vain (worthless, useless)
  2. vain (futile, ineffectual)
  3. unfounded, false, misleading
  4. (of a person, the heart, the mind, etc.) foolish, gullible
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: vain
  • Scots: vane, vain, vaine

Noun[edit]

vein (uncountable)

  1. something that is worthless or futile
  2. idleness, triviality
Alternative forms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

vein (plural veines)

  1. Alternative form of veine (vein)

Etymology 3[edit]

Adverb[edit]

vein

  1. Alternative form of fain