fain

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See also: Fain

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English fain, from Old English fægen, from Proto-Germanic *faganaz (glad), from Proto-Indo-European *peḱ- (to make pretty, please oneself); akin to Old Norse feginn (glad, joyful), Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌲𐌹𐌽𐍉𐌽 (faginōn, to rejoice), Old Norse fagna (to rejoice).[1]

Adjective[edit]

fain (comparative more fain, superlative most fain)

  1. (archaic) Well-pleased, glad.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter primum, in Le Morte Darthur, book XVII:
      Thus Gawayne and Ector abode to gyder / For syre Ector wold not awey til Gawayne were hole / & the good knyȝt Galahad rode so long tyll he came that nyghte to the Castel of Carboneck / & hit befelle hym thus / that he was benyghted in an hermytage / Soo the good man was fayne whan he sawe he was a knyght erraunt
  2. (archaic) Satisfied, contented.
  3. (archaic) Eager, willing or inclined to.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2, Act II scene i[1]:
      Men and birds are fain of climbing high.
    • (Can we date this quote by Jeremy Taylor and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      To a busy man, temptation is fain to climb up together with his business.
  4. (archaic) Obliged or compelled to.
Quotations[edit]
  • 1900, Ernest Dowson, To One in Bedlam, lines 9-10
    O lamentable brother! if those pity thee, / Am I not fain of all thy lone eyes promise me;
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English fain, fayn, feyn, from the adjective (see above).

Adverb[edit]

fain (comparative fainer, superlative fainest)

  1. (archaic) With joy; gladly.
  2. (archaic) By will or choice.
    • c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act I scene i[3]:
      Gonzalo: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground— long heath, brown furze, anything. The wills above be done, but I would fain die a dry death.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English fainen, from Old English fæġenian, from Proto-West Germanic *faginōn, from Proto-Germanic *faginōną.

Verb[edit]

fain (third-person singular simple present fains, present participle faining, simple past and past participle fained)

  1. (archaic) To be delighted or glad; to rejoice.
  2. (archaic) To gladden.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dalmatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin fīnis, fīnem.

Noun[edit]

fain m

  1. end

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English fæġen, from Proto-Germanic *faganaz (glad). The adverb is transferred from the adjective.

Adjective[edit]

fain

  1. joyful, happy
  2. willing, eager
  3. pleasing, enjoyable, attractive

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

fain

  1. gladly, joyfully
  2. willingly, eagerly

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: fain
  • Scots: fain

References[edit]


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French foin, fein, from Latin faenum.

Noun[edit]

fain m (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) hay

Derived terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin famēs.

Noun[edit]

fain f (nominative singular fain)

  1. hunger

Descendants[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German fein.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fain m or n (feminine singular faină, masculine plural faini, feminine and neuter plural faine)

  1. cool, fine, of good quality

Declension[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Sursilvan) fein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) fagn

Etymology[edit]

From Latin faenum.

Noun[edit]

fain m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) hay

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan) fanar

Siar-Lak[edit]

Noun[edit]

fain

  1. woman

Further reading[edit]

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)