met

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: Met, MET, mét, mèt, mêt, mệt, meť, męt, met-, and -met

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: met, IPA(key): /mɛt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

met

  1. simple past tense and past participle of meet

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

met

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense and past participle of mete (to measure)

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English meten (to dream), from Old English mætan (to dream).

Verb[edit]

met (no third-person singular simple present, no present participle, simple past met, no past participle)

  1. (obsolete, impersonal) To dream; to occur (to one) in a dream.
Usage notes[edit]
  • Met is a defective, impersonal verb, and as such it only occurs in the past tense, for example:
Me met that I was walking in a wondrous wood where a thousand wild wolfins live. (I dreamt that I was walking in a wondrous forest where a thousand wild she-wolves live)
  • In Old English and Middle English this verb was not defective and was used both personally and impersonally. However, in northern rural dialects, where it is still in use, this verb only occurs in the past tense and in impersonal constructions.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • moet (Cape Afrikaans)

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch met, from Middle Dutch met, from Old Dutch mit, from Proto-West Germanic *midi, from Proto-Germanic *midi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

met

  1. with
    • 1921, C.J. Langenhoven (lyrics), M.L. de Villiers (music), “Die Stem van Suid-Afrika”, South Africa:
      Met ons land en met ons nasie.
      With our land and with our people.

Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

met

  1. but

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

met

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of metre
  2. second-person singular imperative form of metre

Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German mit.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /met/ (most dialects)
  • IPA(key): /mɛt/ (few dialects)

Preposition[edit]

met (+ dative)

  1. (most dialects) with

Derived terms[edit]

  • mem (contraction with the masculine and neuter definite article)

Chuukese[edit]

Determiner[edit]

met

  1. what

Cimbrian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German mit, from Old High German mit, from Proto-Germanic *midi. Cognate with German mit, Dutch met, Middle English mid, Icelandic með.

Preposition[edit]

met

  1. (Sette Comuni, + dative) with

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • “met” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

met

  1. genitive plural of meta

Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch met, from Old Dutch mit, variant of *midi (from which mee, mede), from Proto-West Germanic *midi, from Proto-Germanic *midi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

met

  1. with, along with (another person)
  2. with, using (a tool, instrument or other means)
  3. at, for, during (a holiday/festivity)
    Heb je zin om met kerst bij ons langs te komen?
    Do you fancy visiting us for Christmas?
  4. (telephony) Used to answer a telephone call, followed by one's name, shortened from "u spreekt met..."
    Met Jan de Vries.
    Hello, this is Jan de Vries.
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: mete
  • Jersey Dutch: met, mät
  • Negerhollands: met, mi, mit, mee
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: met

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch met, from Proto-Germanic *matją, whence also German Mett (through Low German). Related with Proto-Germanic *matiz, whence English meat.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

met n or m (uncountable)

  1. (dated, Eastern Netherlands) mince (sometimes specifically uncooked)
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

met n (genitive singular mets, plural met)

  1. prestige, image, reputation, regard
  2. record

Declension[edit]

Declension of met
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative met metið met metini
accusative met metið met metini
dative meti metinum metum metunum
genitive mets metsins meta metanna

Derived terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈmet/, [ˈme̞t̪]
  • Rhymes: -et
  • Syllabification: met

Pronoun[edit]

met

  1. (personal, dialectal) we

Synonyms[edit]

  • me (standard Finnish)
  • myö (dialectal)

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

met

  1. third-person singular present indicative of mettre

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

met n (genitive singular mets, nominative plural met)

  1. scale (tool for weighing objects)
  2. record (most extreme known value of some achievement)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • met in Icelandic dictionaries at ISLEX

Ilocano[edit]

Adverb[edit]

met

  1. too; also

Kven[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Finnish me, from Proto-Finnic *mek, from Proto-Uralic *me.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

met

  1. we

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Eira Söderholm (2017) Kvensk grammatikk, Tromsø: Cappelen Damm Akademisk, →ISBN, page 276

Ladino[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Hebrew מת(met).

Adjective[edit]

met (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling מת‎)

  1. dead

Synonyms[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

met

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of mest
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of mest
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of mest
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of mest
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of mest
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of mest

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

met

  1. Medial form of mete

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch mit, from Proto-Germanic *midi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

met [+dative]

  1. with
  2. by means of, using (a tool, material etc.)
  3. at the same time as, at
  4. with, under circumstances of
  5. concerning

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

met n

  1. Synonym of ġemet (measure)
    metbelgwallet
    metcundlīċmetrical
    metecornapportion or allowance of grain
    metġeardmeasuring stick, measuring rod
    metrāpmeasuring rope, sounding line

Declension[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Preposition[edit]

met

  1. Alternative form of mid

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

met

  1. genitive plural of meta

Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mȅt m inan

  1. throw (flight of a thrown object)

Inflection[edit]

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. mèt
gen. sing. méta
singular dual plural
nominative mèt méta méti
accusative mèt méta méte
genitive méta métov métov
dative métu métoma métom
locative métu métih métih
instrumental métom métoma méti
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. mèt
gen. sing. mêta
singular dual plural
nominative mèt mêta mêti
accusative mèt mêta mête
genitive mêta mêtov mêtov
dative mêtu mêtoma mêtom
locative mêtu mêtih mêtih
instrumental mêtom mêtoma mêti

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish مد‎, from Arabic مَدّ(madd).

Noun[edit]

met (definite accusative meddi, plural metler)

  1. flow
  2. tide

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

met (nominative plural mets)

  1. (unit) metre

Declension[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From meta (to measure.) Compare Old Norse mjǫt.

Noun[edit]

met n

  1. Measurement.[1]
    dröuw uti metenample in measurement

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lindgren, J. V., 1940, “*mät n.”, in Orbok över Burträskmålet, page 98

Yola[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English mete, from Old English mete, from Proto-West Germanic *mati.

Noun[edit]

met

  1. food, meat in its old meaning.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

Zou[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

met

  1. bug

References[edit]

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 41