mete

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

PIE root
*med-

From Middle English meten, from Old English metan ‎(to measure, mete out, mark off, compare, estimate; pass over, traverse), from Proto-Germanic *metaną ‎(to measure), from Proto-Indo-European *med- ‎(to measure, consider). Cognate with Scots mete ‎(to measure), Saterland Frisian meete ‎(to measure), West Frisian mjitte ‎(to measure), Dutch meten ‎(to measure), German messen ‎(to measure), Swedish mäta ‎(to measure), Latin modus ‎(limit, measure, target), Ancient Greek μεδίμνος ‎(medímnos, measure, bushel), Ancient Greek μέδεσθαι ‎(médesthai, care for), Old Armenian միտ ‎(mit, mind).

Verb[edit]

mete ‎(third-person singular simple present metes, present participle meting, simple past and past participle meted)

  1. (transitive, archaic, poetic, dialectal) To measure.
    • 1611King James Version of the Bible, Matthew 7:2
      For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again.
    • 1870s Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Soothsay, lines 80-83
      the Power that fashions man
      Measured not out thy little span
      For thee to take the meting-rod
      In turn,
  2. (transitive, usually with “out”) To dispense, measure (out), allot (especially punishment, reward etc.).
    • 1833Alfred Tennyson, Ulysses
      Match'd with an agèd wife, I mete and dole
      Unequal laws unto a savage race
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English, from Old French mete ‎(boundary, boundary marker), from Latin mēta ‎(post, goal, marker), from Proto-Indo-European *meit- ‎(stake, post). Cognate with Old English wullmod ("distaff").

Noun[edit]

mete ‎(plural metes)

  1. A boundary or other limit; a boundary-marker; mere.

Czech[edit]

Verb[edit]

mete

  1. Third-person singular present indicative form of mést

Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

mete

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of meten

Anagrams[edit]


Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French mettre ‎(put, put on)

Verb[edit]

mete

  1. put
  2. put on

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

mete f

  1. plural of meta

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

mete

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of metō

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English mete ‎(food). More at meat.

Noun[edit]

mete

  1. food; meat.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French mete ‎(boundary, mere). More at mete.

Noun[edit]

mete

  1. boundary, target, point, position.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English ġemǣte ‎(suitable, meet). More at meet.

Adjective[edit]

mēte

  1. suitable, fitting, appropriate.
  2. pleasing, accommodating, useful.
  3. right in shape or size, well-fitting.

Adverb[edit]

mēte

  1. appropriately
  2. copiously

References[edit]

  • The Middle English Dictionary (M.E.D.)[1]
  • Riverside Chaucer[2]

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *matiz.

Noun[edit]

mete m

  1. food

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

mete

  1. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present indicative of meter
  2. Second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of meter

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

mete

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of meter.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of meter.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of meter.