modus

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin. See mode.

Noun[edit]

modus ‎(plural modi)

  1. (law, obsolete) The arrangement of, or mode of expressing, the terms of a contract or conveyance.
  2. (law) A qualification involving the idea of variation or departure from some general rule or form, in the way of either restriction or enlargement, according to the circumstances of the case, as in the will of a donor, an agreement between parties, etc.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Henry de Bracton to this entry?)
  3. (law) A fixed compensation or equivalent given instead of payment of tithes in kind, expressed in full by the phrase modus decimandi.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Blackstone to this entry?)
    • Landor
      They, from time immemorial, had paid a modus, or composition.
    • The Wealth of Nations - Adam Smith
      When, instead either of a certain portion of the produce of land, or of the price of a certain portion, a certain sum of money is to be paid in full compensation for all tax or tythe; the tax becomes, in this case, exactly of the same nature with the land tax of England. It neither rises nor falls with the rent of the land. It neither encourages nor discourages improvement. The tythe in the greater part of those parishes which pay what is called a modus, in lieu of all other tythe is a tax of this kind. During the Mahometan government of Bengal, instead of the payment in kind of the fifth part of the produce, a modus, and, it is said, a very moderate one, was established in the greater part of the districts or zemindaries of the country. Some of the servants of the East India company, under pretence of restoring the public revenue to its proper value, have, in some provinces, exchanged this modus for a payment in kind. Under their management, this change is likely both to discourage cultivation, and to give new opportunities for abuse in the collection of the public revenue, which has fallen very much below what it was said to have been when it first fell under the management of the company. The servants of the company may, perhaps, have profited by the change, but at the expense, it is probable, both of their masters and of the country.

Related terms[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia cs

Noun[edit]

modus m

  1. (statistics) mode (value occurring most frequently in a distribution)

Related terms[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

< Latin modus

Noun[edit]

modus

  1. (grammar) mood

Declension[edit]

Inflection of modus (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
nominative modus modukset
genitive moduksen modusten
moduksien
partitive modusta moduksia
illative modukseen moduksiin
singular plural
nominative modus modukset
accusative nom. modus modukset
gen. moduksen
genitive moduksen modusten
moduksien
partitive modusta moduksia
inessive moduksessa moduksissa
elative moduksesta moduksista
illative modukseen moduksiin
adessive moduksella moduksilla
ablative modukselta moduksilta
allative modukselle moduksille
essive moduksena moduksina
translative modukseksi moduksiksi
instructive moduksin
abessive moduksetta moduksitta
comitative moduksineen

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *mod-os ‎(measure), form *med- ‎(to measure).[1] But note as the oblique cases would be expected as *moder- (e.g. gen.: moderis), thus moderor, modestus etc.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

modus m ‎(genitive modī); second declension

  1. measure
  2. bound, limit
  3. manner, method, way
    • 1272, an unknown source in The Natural History of Precious Stones and of the Precious Metals (1867), viii, page 269:
      Una Perla ad modum camahuti.
      A pearl in the manner of a cameo.
  4. (grammar) mood, mode

Declension[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative modus modī
genitive modī modōrum
dative modō modīs
accusative modum modōs
ablative modō modīs
vocative mode modī

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • modus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • modus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • MODUS” in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • modus” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the melody: modi (De Or. 1. 42. 187)
    • to compose, put to music: modos facere
    • to observe moderation, be moderate: modum tenere, retinere, servare, adhibere
    • to set a limit to a thing: modum facere, statuere, constituere alicui rei or alicuius rei
    • to pass the limit: modum transire
    • to pass the limit: extra modum prodire
    • to pass the limit: ultra modum progredi
    • to show moderation in a matter: moderationem, modum adhibere in aliqua re
    • beyond all measure: extra, praeter modum
    • to limit one's expenditure: sumptibus modum statuere
    • (ambiguous) to translate freely: his fere verbis, hoc fere modo convertere, transferre
    • (ambiguous) with no moderation: sine modo; nullo modo adhibito
    • (ambiguous) to flee like deer, sheep: pecorum modo fugere (Liv. 40. 27)
  • modus” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  1. ^ “modo, mo'” in: Alberto Nocentini, Alessandro Parenti, “l'Etimologico — Vocabolario della lingua italiana”, Le Monnier, 2010, ISBN 978-88-00-20781-2

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Latin modus

Noun[edit]

modus m ‎(definite singular modusen, indefinite plural modi or moduser, definite plural modiene or modusene)

  1. mode
  2. (grammar) mood

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin modus

Noun[edit]

modus m ‎(definite singular modusen, indefinite plural modi or modusar, definite plural modiane or modusane)

  1. mode
  2. (grammar) mood

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]