domus

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Latin[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *domos, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm(house, home), from root *dem-(to build). Cognates include Ancient Greek δόμος(dómos), Albanian dhomë(a chamber, a room), Avestan 𐬨𐬀𐬛(dam-) Sanskrit दम(dáma) and Proto-Slavic *domъ. The same Proto-Indo-European root also gave Old English timber(building, act of building); see modern English timber.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

domus f ‎(variously declined, genitive domūs or domī); fourth declension, second declension

  1. house, home
  2. (poetic) any building or abode
  3. native place, one's country or home (confer patria)
  4. household, family, race

Usage notes[edit]

  • Domus is one of a handful of common nouns that take the locative case, others are rus and humus. It is irregular in that it has a mix of second and fourth declension forms, the second declension forms being more commonly used in place constructions.

Declension[edit]

Fourth declension with locative, some alternative forms from the second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative domus domūs
genitive domūs
domī
domuum
domōrum
dative domuī
domō
domū
domibus
accusative domum domūs
domōs
ablative domū
domō
domibus
vocative domus domūs
locative domī

Derived terms[edit]

  • dominus
  • domesticus
  • domuitiō
  • domuncula
  • domus equestris
  • domī(at home, in the house, adverbial form)
  • domī habeō(I have at home, I have in abundance, I am provided with, colloquial)
  • domum(home, homewards, to the house, adverbial form)
  • domō(from home, out of the house; at home, in the house, adverbial form)
  • extrā domum(placed outside of the house; refers to a possible result of Catholic ecclesiastical legal proceedings when the culprit is removed from being part of a group like a monastery)
  • prō domō(for one’s own home or house; serving the interests of a given perspective or for the benefit of a given group)

Descendants[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • domus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • domus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • DOMUS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.domus”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a comfortably-furnished house: domus necessariis rebus instructa
    • the house threatens to fall in (vid. sect. X. 5, note 'Threaten'...): domus ruina impendet
    • the house threatens to fall in (vid. sect. X. 5, note 'Threaten'...): domus collapsura, corruitura (esse) videtur
    • the house suddenly fell in ruins: domus subita ruina collapsa est
    • to demolish, raze a house: domum demoliri (Top. 4. 22)
    • the house is not large enough for all: domus non omnes capit (χωρειν)
    • to be a regular visitor at a house: domum frequentare (Sall. Cat. 14. 7)
    • the house walls are beginning to crack: domus rimas agit
    • (ambiguous) to welcome to one's house (opp. to shut one's door against some one): tecto, (in) domum suam aliquem recipere (opp. prohibere aliquem tecto, domo)
    • to welcome a man as a guest in one's house: hospitio aliquem accipere or excipere (domum ad se)
    • I am always welcome at his house: domus patet, aperta est mihi
    • (ambiguous) to invite some one to one's house: invitare aliquem tecto ac domo or domum suam (Liv. 3. 14. 5)
    • to give, undertake a contract for building a house: domum aedificandam locare, conducere
    • (ambiguous) to rush out of the house: se proripere ex domo
    • (ambiguous) I felt quite at home in his house: apud eum sic fui tamquam domi meae (Fam. 13. 69)
    • (ambiguous) to welcome to one's house (opp. to shut one's door against some one): tecto, (in) domum suam aliquem recipere (opp. prohibere aliquem tecto, domo)
    • (ambiguous) to never set foot out of doors: domo pedem non efferre
    • (ambiguous) to never appear in public: domi se tenere
    • (ambiguous) to escort a person from his house: deducere aliquem de domo
    • (ambiguous) at home; in one's native country: domi (opp. foris)
    • (ambiguous) to turn a person out of his house, his property: expellere aliquem domo, possessionibus pellere
    • (ambiguous) to live in some one's house: habitare in domo alicuius, apud aliquem (Acad. 2. 36. 115)
    • (ambiguous) to emigrate: domo emigrare (B. G. 1. 31)
    • (ambiguous) homeless: domo profugus (Liv. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) to invite some one to one's house: invitare aliquem tecto ac domo or domum suam (Liv. 3. 14. 5)
  • domus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • domus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

domus

  1. predicative plural of dom