timber

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See also: Timber

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English tymber, from Old English timber, from Proto-Germanic *timrą, from Proto-Indo-European *dem- (build, house) (see Proto-Indo-European *dṓm). Cognates include Dutch timmer, Old High German zimbar (German Zimmer), Norwegian tømmer, Old Norse timbr, Gothic 𐍄𐌹𐌼𐍂𐌾𐌰𐌽 (timrjan, to build), Latin domus and Ancient Greek δόμος (dómos).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

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timber (countable and uncountable, plural timbers)

  1. (uncountable) Trees in a forest regarded as a source of wood.
  2. (outside Canada, US, uncountable) Wood that has been pre-cut and is ready for use in construction.
  3. (countable) A heavy wooden beam, generally a whole log that has been squared off and used to provide heavy support for something such as a roof.
    the timbers of a ship
  4. (firearms, informal) The wooden stock of a rifle or shotgun.
  5. (archaic) A certain quantity of fur skins (as of martens, ermines, sables, etc.) packed between boards; in some cases forty skins, in others one hundred and twenty. Also timmer, timbre.
Synonyms[edit]
Hyponyms[edit]
  • (wooden beam used to provide support): crosstree
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Interjection[edit]

timber!

  1. Used by loggers to warn others that a tree being felled is falling.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

timber (third-person singular simple present timbers, present participle timbering, simple past and past participle timbered)

  1. (transitive) To fit with timbers.
    timbering a roof
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To construct, frame, build.
    • 1646, Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, London: Edw. Dod & Nath. Ekins, 1650, Book I, Chapter 5, p. 14,[1]
      For many heads that undertake [learning], were never squared nor timbred for it.
  3. (falconry, intransitive) To light or land on a tree.
  4. (obsolete) To make a nest.
  5. (transitive) To surmount as a timber does.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

timber

  1. Misspelling of timbre.

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

timber n (definite singular timberet, uncountable)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 1938; superseded by tømmer

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *timrą, from Proto-Indo-European *dem- (build, house) (see Proto-Indo-European *dṓm). Cognates include Old Saxon timbar, Old High German zimbar (German Zimmer), Old Norse timbr, Gothic 𐍄𐌹𐌼𐍂𐌾𐌰𐌽 (timrjan, to build), and Latin domus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

timber n

  1. timber
  2. a building
  3. the act of building

Descendants[edit]


Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse timbr, from Proto-Germanic *timrą.

Noun[edit]

timber n

  1. timber; wood used for building

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]