construct

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin constructus, from construo (I heap together, build, make, construct, connect grammatically), from com- (together) + struo (I heap up, pile). Doublet of construe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun

  • (UK) enPR: kŏn'strŭkt, IPA(key): /ˈkɒn.stɹʌkt/
  • (US) enPR: kän'strŭkt, IPA(key): /ˈkɑn.stɹʌkt/
  • (file)

Verb

Noun[edit]

construct (plural constructs)

  1. Something constructed from parts.
    The artwork was a construct of wire and tubes.
    Loops and conditional statements are constructs in computer programming.
  2. A concept or model.
    Bohr's theoretical construct of the atom was soon superseded by quantum mechanics.
  3. (genetics) A segment of nucleic acid, created artificially, for transplantation into a target cell or tissue.

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Verb[edit]

construct (third-person singular simple present constructs, present participle constructing, simple past and past participle constructed)

  1. (transitive) To build or form (something) by assembling parts.
    We constructed the radio from spares.
  2. (transitive) To build (a sentence, an argument, etc.) by arranging words or ideas.
    A sentence may be constructed with a subject, verb and object.
    • (Can we date this quote by Marita Sturken and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The Vietnam War films are forms of memory that function to provide collective rememberings, to construct history, and to subsume within them the experience of the veterans.
  3. (transitive, geometry) To draw (a geometric figure) by following precise specifications and using geometric tools and techniques.
    Construct a circle that touches each vertex of the given triangle.

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Further reading[edit]

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