concetto

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See also: concettò

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian concetto, from Latin conceptus. See conceit and concept, which are doublets.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

concetto (plural concetti)

  1. (literature) Affected wit; a witty turn of phrase; a conceit.
    Synonym: conceit
    • 1997, James Biester, Lyric Wonder: Rhetoric and Wit in Renaissance English Poetry, Cornell University Press (→ISBN), page 32:
      Tasso in particular, Mirollo notes, treated the concetto "as the equivalent in a lyric poem of plot in longer works." Pellegrino, similarly, and with reference to Tasso, says that concetti "are the soul and the form of a composition" []
    • 2006, Vernon Hyde Minor, The Death of the Baroque and the Rhetoric of Good Taste, Cambridge University Press (→ISBN), page 9:
      But to restrict the concetto to an idea or concept gives short shrift to the metaphorical and sometimes occult implications of the term. Conceit as discors concordia involves the comparison of unlike things, the finding of similarity in dissimilarity.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chesterfield to this entry?)

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin conceptus (received, caught; derived from; contained, held; adopted; conceived). It was also originally the past participle of concepire.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

concetto m (plural concetti)

  1. concept
  2. opinion
    Synonym: opinione
  3. idea
  4. (theater, rhetoric) In Italian comedy (commedia dell'arte), stock punch line learned by the performers for use in this improvisational form of theater.
    Synonyms: vivezza, acutezza
  5. conceit (work full of orotund phrases and pompous concetti, affected wit)

Descendants[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Neapolitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin conceptus (received, caught; derived from; contained, held; adopted; conceived).

Noun[edit]

concetto m (plural conciette)

  1. concept