rhetoric

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English rethorik, from Latin rēthoricus, rhētoricus, from Ancient Greek ῥητορῐκός (rhētorikós).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪˈtɒɹɪk/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

rhetoric

  1. Synonym of rhetorical.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English rethorik, rhetoric, from Old French rhetorique, from Latin rhētorica, from Ancient Greek ῥητορική (rhētorikḗ), ellipsis of ῥητορικὴ τέχνη (rhētorikḕ tékhnē), from ῥητορικός (rhētorikós, concerning public speech), from ῥήτωρ (rhḗtōr, public speaker).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rhetoric (countable and uncountable, plural rhetorics)

  1. The art of using language, especially public speaking, as a means to persuade.
  2. Meaningless language with an exaggerated style intended to impress.
    It’s only so much rhetoric.
Usage notes[edit]
  • Adjectives often applied to "rhetoric":
    • (by kind or area of application) political, legal, visual, classical, ancient
    • (by quality) violent, empty, inflammatory, hateful, heated, fiery, vitriolic, angry, overheated, extreme
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Anagrams[edit]