dom

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Contents

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

dom

  1. (mathematics) domain

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping of dominator or dominate.

Noun[edit]

dom (plural doms)

  1. A dominator (in sadomasochistic sexual practices), especially a male one.
Synonyms[edit]
  • (dominator): domme (female)

Verb[edit]

dom (third-person singular simple present doms, present participle domming, simple past and past participle dommed)

  1. (slang, online gaming or BDSM) to dominate
    • 2006, Bitch: feminist response to pop culture (issues 31-34)
      Nola is actually "Nurse Nola," a dominatrix who specializes in medical role playing. [] "After that," she continues, "I started domming, which I did for a long time, but have never liked much.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom (plural doms)

  1. A title anciently given to the pope, and later to other church dignitaries and some monastic orders.

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from Portuguese dom.

Noun[edit]

dom (plural doms or dons)

  1. A title formerly borne by member of the high nobility of Portugal and Brazil

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dómr (judgement), from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom c (singular definite dommen, plural indefinite domme)

  1. sentence
  2. conviction
  3. judgement
  4. verdict
  5. (logic) proposition
  6. decision
  7. damnation, doom

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch dom, from Old Dutch dumb, from Proto-Germanic *dumbaz.

Adjective[edit]

dom (comparative dommer, superlative domst)

  1. dumb, brainless
  2. stupid, silly
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of dom
uninflected dom
inflected domme
comparative dommer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial dom dommer het domst
het domste
indefinite m./f. sing. domme dommere domste
n. sing. dom dommer domste
plural domme dommere domste
definite domme dommere domste
partitive doms dommers
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch doem, from Latin domus (house, building), from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build). Cf. Old Dutch duom.

Noun[edit]

dom m (plural dommen, diminutive dommetje n) (only domkerken, domkerkje)

  1. domkerk, either an episcopal cathedral or another major church (often a basilica) which has been granted this high rank
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin dominus (master), from Latin domus (house, building), from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

Noun[edit]

dom m (plural dommen, diminutive dommetje n)

  1. ecclesiastical form of address, notably for a Benedictine priest
  2. nobleman or clergyman in certain Catholic countries, notably Portugal and its colonies
See also[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom m (plural dommen, diminutive dommetje n)

  1. Archaic form of duim (thumb, pivot)
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • M. J. Koenen & J. Endepols, Verklarend Handwoordenboek der Nederlandse Taal (tevens Vreemde-woordentolk), Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1969 (26th edition) [Dutch dictionary in Dutch]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Italian don or older dom, from Latin dominus (master). Cognate with English don.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom m (plural doms)

  1. title of respect given to certain monks and other religious figures

Further reading[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

dōm

  1. Romanization of 𐌳𐍉𐌼

Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish dom.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dom (emphatic domsa)

  1. first-person singular of do (to/for me)

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

dom (triggers lenition)

  1. (Munster) Contraction of do mo.
    Thugas an féirín dom mháthair.
    I gave the present to my mother.
Related terms[edit]

Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom m (invariable)

  1. dominant, top (dominating BDSM partner)

See also[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *domъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom m (diminutive domk)

  1. house

Declension[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch dumb, from Proto-Germanic *dumbaz.

Adjective[edit]

dom

  1. dumb, unwise, stupid

Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • domb”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • domp”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dómr (judgement), from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos.

Noun[edit]

dom m (definite singular dommen, indefinite plural dommer, definite plural dommene)

  1. judgement, sentence

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dómr (judgement).

Noun[edit]

dom m (definite singular dommen, indefinite plural dommar, definite plural dommane)

  1. judgement, sentence

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos. Cognate with Old Frisian dōm, Old Saxon dōm, Old High German tuom, Old Norse dómr, Gothic 𐌳𐍉𐌼𐍃 (dōms). The Germanic source was from a stem verb originally meaning ‘to place, to set’ (a sense-development also found in Latin statutum, Ancient Greek θέμις (thémis)).

Noun[edit]

dōm m

  1. law, statute
  2. judgement
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *dōmi, first-person singular of *dōną (to do).

Verb[edit]

dōm

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dōn

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin de + unde

Pronoun[edit]

dom

  1. of whom; of which

Descendants[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

do (to, for) + (me)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dom

  1. first-person singular of do: to/for me
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from the root *dem- (to build).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom ?

  1. home
  2. house
Inflection[edit]
Unknown gender u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative
Vocative
Accusative
Genitive
Dative
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Scottish Gaelic: domh

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *domъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom m inan

  1. home
    Idę do domu. – I'm going home.

Noun[edit]

dom m (diminutive domek)

  1. house (building)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Nouns:

Adjectives:

Further reading[edit]

  • dom in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (obsolete, abbreviation)

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese don, from Latin donum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom m (plural dons)

  1. gift
  2. talent

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French dôme.

Noun[edit]

dom n (plural domuri)

  1. dome

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *domъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dȏm m (Cyrillic spelling до̑м)

  1. home, house

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *domъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom m (genitive singular domu, nominative plural domy, genitive plural domov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. house

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • dom in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *domъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm, from root Proto-Indo-European *dem- (to build).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dóm m inan (genitive dóma, nominative plural domôvi or dómi)

  1. home (house or structure in which someone lives)

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse dómr (judgement), from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos.

Noun[edit]

dom c

  1. (law) conviction, judgement of court, sentence, verdict, doom
  2. doomsday, the final judgement
Declension[edit]
Declension of dom 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative dom domen domar domarna
Genitive doms domens domars domarnas
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin domus.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • di (def 1, strongly dialectal)

Noun[edit]

dom c

  1. dome
Declension[edit]
Declension of dom 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative dom domen domer domerna
Genitive doms domens domers domernas

Pronoun[edit]

dom

  1. (informal) Eye dialect spelling of de.
  2. (informal) Eye dialect spelling of dem.

Article[edit]

dom

  1. (informal) Eye dialect spelling of de.

Anagrams[edit]


Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom

  1. (rare) anus, prolapse of the rectum

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

dom (plural doms)

  1. house

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]