ar

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English *ar, arres pl, from earlier *er.

Noun[edit]

ar (plural ars)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter R.
    All the ars in the inscription.
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ar

  1. (UK, West Country, West Midlands) Alternative form of arr
Derived terms[edit]

Particle[edit]

ar

  1. (UK, West Country, West Midlands) Alternative form of arr

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

ar

  1. Obsolete spelling of are
    • 1570, Roger Ascham, The Scholemaster:
      But commonlie, the fairest bodies, ar bestowed on the foulest purposes.

Anagrams[edit]


Abinomn[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar

  1. Pometia pinnata

Albanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Latin aurum (gold).[1][2] Considering the rendering of Latin au- as Albanian ā-, it is a relatively archaic borrowing. Although Arbëresh dialects preserve the original Latin neuter, in standard Albanian it is masculine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m (definite singular ari)[3]

  1. (chemistry) gold
    Synonyms: flori, dukat
    • 1555, Gjon Buzuku, Meshari
      Të provuomitë e fesë saj të jetë mā e pāçmuome se ari.The temptations of her religion are more precious than (the) gold.
  2. (figuratively) treasure, gem
    Synonym: thesar
  3. golden thread
Derived terms[edit]
Declension[edit]

Adjective[edit]

ar m (feminine are)

  1. golden
    Synonyms: artë, flori
    Ai/ajo e ka zemrën ar.He/she has a golden heart.
  2. (figuratively) precious
    Synonym: çmueshëm
  3. (figuratively) yellow; white, bright
    Synonyms: verdhë, lylc, bardhë, ndritshëm
  4. (figuratively) blonde, bright, light (hair)
    Synonym: biond

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably via French are (are).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m (indefinite plural arë, definite singular ari, definite plural arët)[4]

  1. are (unit of area; abbrev. a)
    (metric unit of measure:) 1 a = 100 (m²) square meters = ~119.6 square yards
    Synonym: a (abbrev.)
Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “ar”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 7
  2. ^ Topalli, Kolec (2017), “ar”, in Fjalor Etimologjik i Gjuhës Shqipe, Durrës, Albania: Jozef, page 111
  3. ^ [1] m. noun (& adjective) ar (I) "gold / golden" (def. ari) • Fjalor Shqip (Albanian Dictionary)
  4. ^ [2] m. noun ar (II) "are" (def./sg. ari; indef./pl. arë; def./pl. arët) • Fjalor Shqip (Albanian Dictionary)

Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin arō. Compare Daco-Romanian ara, ar.

Verb[edit]

ar (third-person singular present indicative arã, past participle aratã)

  1. I plough.

Related terms[edit]


Azerbaijani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Arabic عَار(ʿār).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɑr/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

ar (definite accusative arı, plural arlar)

  1. feeling of shame

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar inan or anim

  1. male

Declension[edit]

Declension of ar (animate and inanimate, ending in -r)
indefinite singular plural
absolutive ar arra arrak
ergative arrek arrak arrek
dative arri arrari arrei
genitive arren arraren arren
comitative arrekin arrarekin arrekin
causative arrengatik arrarengatik arrengatik
benefactive arrentzat arrarentzat arrentzat
instrumental arrez arraz arrez
inessive anim. arrengan arrarengan arrengan
inanim. arretan arrean arretan
locative anim.
inanim. arretako arreko arretako
allative anim. arrengana arrarengana arrengana
inanim. arretara arrera arretara
terminative anim. arrenganaino arrarenganaino arrenganaino
inanim. arretaraino arreraino arretaraino
directive anim. arrenganantz arrarenganantz arrenganantz
inanim. arretarantz arrerantz arretarantz
destinative anim. arrenganako arrarenganako arrenganako
inanim. arretarako arrerako arretarako
ablative anim. arrengandik arrarengandik arrengandik
inanim. arretatik arretik arretatik
partitive arrik
prolative artzat

Breton[edit]

Article[edit]

ar

  1. the

See also[edit]


Chuukese[edit]

Determiner[edit]

ar

  1. third person plural general possessive; their

Related terms[edit]


Cimbrian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle High German ahorn, from Old High German ahorn. Cognate with German Ahorn.

Noun[edit]

ar m

  1. (Luserna) maple, maple tree
Alternative forms[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ar

  1. (Sette Comuni) Short for èar (he).
    Ar khimmet lóofanten.
    He comes running.

References[edit]

  • “ar” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French are, created during the French Revolution as a learned formation from Latin area, a piece of level ground.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m inan

  1. are (unit of area equal to 100 square metres)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ar" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007

Further reading[edit]

  • ar in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ar in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse ørr.

Noun[edit]

ar n (singular definite arret, plural indefinite ar)

  1. scar
  2. (slang) mouth
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ar

  1. imperative of arre

Etymology 2[edit]

From French are, from Latin ārea (open space).

Noun[edit]

ar c (singular definite aren, plural indefinite ar)

  1. are (square decametre, 100 m²)
Inflection[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch arre, erre, irre, from Old Dutch *irri, from Proto-Germanic *irzijaz.

Adjective[edit]

ar (comparative arder, superlative arst)

  1. (archaic) sorry, sad, regrettable
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Back-formation from arrenslee (see there for further etymology).

Noun[edit]

ar m or f (plural arren, diminutive arretje n)

  1. (obsolete) sledge
Related terms[edit]

Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese aar, from an older aere, from Latin aēr.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m (plural ares)

  1. air

Etymology 2[edit]

Unknown

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ar

  1. (archaic) furthermore, in addition
  2. (archaic) never

References[edit]

  • ar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2012.
  • aar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2012.
  • aere” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2016.
  • ar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • ar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • ar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Hausa[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: ar̃

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

ar̃

  1. damn it

Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From a conflation of three Old Irish prepositions:

  1. ar (for) (triggering lenition), from Proto-Celtic *ɸare (in front of), from Proto-Indo-European *pr̥h₂i. Cognates include Ancient Greek παρά (pará, beside) and English fore.
  2. for (on) (triggering no mutation), from Proto-Celtic *uɸor (over, on) (compare Welsh ar, Breton war), from Proto-Indo-European *upér (compare Latin super, Ancient Greek ὑπέρ (hupér), Old English ofer).
  3. íar (after) (triggering eclipsis), from Proto-Celtic *eɸirom (after, behind), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁epi.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

ar (plus dative, triggers no mutation in general references but lenition in qualified or particularized references, triggers eclipsis in a few fixed expressions)

  1. on
  2. Used with a variety of nouns to indicate feelings and minor medical conditions
    Tá áthas orm.
    I am glad.
    (literally, “Joy is on me.”)
    Tá ocras orm.
    I am hungry.
    (literally, “Hunger is on me.”)
    Tá slaghdán orm.
    I have a cold.
    (literally, “A cold is on me.”)
  3. Used with a verbal noun to indicate a state
    ar crithtrembling
    ar foluainhovering
    ar díolfor sale
  4. upon (with a verbal noun plus personal form of do indicating the subject of the verb)
    ar éirí domwhen I get/got up; upon my rising
  5. upon (with a (his, her, their)—indicating the subject of an intransitive verb or the object of a transitive verb—plus verbal noun to indicate completion of an action)
    ar a theacht   or
    arna theachtwhen he comes/came; on his coming
    ar a chríochnú dom   or
    arna chríochnú domwhen I (had) completed it; upon my completion of it
  6. (in conjunction with the verb ) must, have to
    Bhí orainn anailís a dhéanamh ar bhlúirí a bhí bainte as téacs.
    We had to analyse fragments abstracted from a text.
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

See also: Category:Irish phrasal verbs with particle (ar)

Etymology 2[edit]

an +‎ -r

Particle[edit]

ar (triggers lenition except of past autonomous forms; used only in the past tense of regular and some irregular verbs)

  1. Used to form direct and indirect questions
    Ar chuala tú mé?Did you hear me?
    Níl a fhios agam ar chas sé an t-amhrán.I don’t know if/whether he sang the song.
    Ar ól an cat an bainne?Did the cat drink the milk?
    Ar cuireadh an síol?Was the seed sown?
  2. Used to form direct and indirect copular questions; used before consonants
    Ar mhúinteoir tú?Were you a teacher?
Related terms[edit]
  • an (used with non-past tenses and in the past tense of some irregular verbs)

Etymology 3[edit]

a +‎ -r

Particle[edit]

ar (triggers lenition except of past autonomous forms; used only in the past tense of regular and some irregular verbs)

  1. Introduces an indirect relative clause
    an chathaoir ar shuigh an gasúr airthe chair the boy sat on
    an cailín ar ól a cat an bainnethe girl whose cat drank the milk
    an gort ar cuireadh an síol annthe field the seed was sown in
Related terms[edit]
  • a (used with non-past tenses and with the past of some irregular verbs)

Particle[edit]

ar (copular form used before consonants and nouns beginning with vowels; triggers lenition in the past/conditional)

  1. Introduces an indirect relative clause; present/future tense
    an fear ar múinteoir a mhacthe man whose son is a teacher
    an fear ar iascaire a mhacthe man whose son is a fisherman
  2. Introduces an indirect relative clause; past/conditional tense
    an fear ar mhúinteoir a mhacthe man whose son was a teacher
  3. Introduces a direct or indirect interrogative; past/conditional tense
    Ar mhaith leat cupán tae?
    Would you like a cup of tea?
    Níl a fhios agam ar mhaith léi cupán tae.
    I don’t know if she would like a cup of tea.
Related terms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ar (triggers lenition except of past autonomous forms; used only in the past tense of regular and some irregular verbs)

  1. all that, whatever
    Sin ar chonnaic mé ann.That’s all that I saw there.
    Ar thuig tú ar canadh?Did you understand all that was sung?
    Cheannaigh mé ar íoc tú as.I bought whatever you paid for.
Related terms[edit]
  • a (form used with non-past tenses and with the past of some irregular verbs)

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle Irish ol, from Old Irish ol.

Verb[edit]

ar (used only with 3rd-person pronouns, usually emphatic)

  1. said, says
    “Tar isteach,” ar seisean.
    “Come in,” he said.
    “Ní thuigim,” ar sise.
    “I don’t understand,” she says.
    “Cén fáth?” ar siadsan.
    “Why?” they said.
Related terms[edit]
  • arsa (used with other persons and with full nouns)

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m (genitive singular air)

  1. verbal noun of air (plough)
  2. (literary, agriculture) tillage
Declension[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ar n-ar har t-ar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "ar" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “ar” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “ar” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Kalasha[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit आरा (ārā), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁óleh₂ (awl). Cognate with German Ahle, English awl.

Noun[edit]

ar

  1. awl

Khasi[edit]

Khasi cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : ar

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Khasian *ʔaːr, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *ɓaar. Cognate with Pnar ar, Blang [La Gang] lál, Bahnar ʼbar, Khmer ពីរ (pii), Vietnamese hai, Santali ᱵᱟᱨ (bar).

Numeral[edit]

ar

  1. two

Latgalian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂er-. Cognates include Latvian ar (with) and Lithuanian ar (whether).

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

ar (+ accusative)

  1. with

References[edit]

  • Nicole Nau (2011) A short grammar of Latgalian, München: LINCOM GmbH, →ISBN

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂er- Cognate with Lithuanian ar (whether, if, and), Ancient Greek ἄρα (ára, then).

Preposition[edit]

ar (with instrumental)

  1. with

Verb[edit]

ar

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of art
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of art
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of art
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of art
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of art
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of art

Lithuanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂er-. Cognate with Latvian ar (whether, if, with), Ancient Greek ἄρα (ára, then).

Conjunction[edit]

ar̃

  1. (interrogative) whether, if
    Ar norite valgyti?Do you want to eat?
    Nežinau, ar tai tiesa, ar ne.I don't know whether that is true or not.
  2. (dialectal) and

Usage notes[edit]

Although commonly placed at the start of a sentence to form a yes/no question, it is not necessary to use ar to form such a question. Intonation alone can accomplish that. Additionally, there are other particles that can be used for the same purpose: ar̃gi, , benè, gál, kažìn, nègi, nejaũ, nejaũgi.

See also[edit]

  • czy (word with the same function in Polish, which has significant historical presence in Lithuania)

References[edit]

  • Vytautas Ambrazas (2006) Lithuanian Grammar, 2nd revised edition, →ISBN, pages 400, 428, 597, 712–713
  • Derksen, Rick (2015), “ar”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 59

Further reading[edit]

  • ar”, in Lietuvių kalbos žodynas [Dictionary of the Lithuanian language], lkz.lt, 1941–2022
  • ar”, in Dabartinės lietuvių kalbos žodynas [Dictionary of contemporary Lithuanian], ekalba.lt, 1954–2022

Middle English[edit]

Determiner[edit]

ar

  1. (chiefly Kent and West Midlands) Alternative form of here (their)

Middle Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *ar, from Proto-Celtic *ɸare.

Preposition[edit]

ar (triggers lenition)

  1. on, upon
  2. over, of (of a ruler with respect to the area ruled)
Inflection[edit]
  • First-person singular: arnaf
  • Second-person singular: arnat
  • Third-person singular masculine: arnaw
  • Third-person singular feminine: arnei, erni
  • First-person plural: arnam
  • Second-person plural: arnawch
  • Third-person plural: arnunt
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Welsh: ar

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ar

  1. he/she who, whoever
    • Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet:
      Ar ny del yn uuyd, kymmeller o nerth cledyueu.
      Whoever does not come with obedience shall be compelled by the force of swords.
  2. that which, whatever
    • Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet:
      Pa amgen uedwl yssyd yndaw ef heno noc ar a uu yr blwydyn y heno?
      What is the different mind that is in him tonight than that which has been since a year ago tonight?

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

ar ?

  1. flour
    Synonym: ard
  2. fire
    Synonym: agir
  3. shame, disgrace
    Synonym: 'ar
  4. are (square decametre, 100 m²)
  5. Abbreviation of argon.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From French are (are), from Latin ārea (a piece of level ground, vacant ground, house ground), either from Proto-Italic *āzeā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eHs-e-yeh₂, from *h₂eHs- (to become dry, burn; hearth, ashes), or from Proto-Italic *āreā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eh₂r-e-yeh₂, from *h₂eh₂rh₃- (threshing tool).

Noun[edit]

ar n (definite singular aret, indefinite plural ar, definite plural ara or arene)

  1. an are, area of 100 square metres

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • “ar” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “ar” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From French are, from Latin area

Noun[edit]

ar n (definite singular aret, indefinite plural ar, definite plural ara)

  1. an are, area of 100 square metres

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *aiʀu (respect, honour). Cognate with German Ehre.

Noun[edit]

ār f

  1. honour, glory, grace
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *aiʀ.

Cognate with Old Norse eir (brass, copper), German ehern (of metal, of iron), Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐌶 (aiz, ore), from Proto-Indo-European *áyos, h₂éyos. Compare Dutch oer (iron-holding earth). Confer Latin aes (bronze, copper), Avestan 𐬀𐬌𐬌𐬀𐬵(aiiah), Sanskrit अयस् (áyas, copper, iron).

Noun[edit]

ār n

  1. ore, brass, copper
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *airu, from Proto-Germanic *airō (oar). Cognate with Old Norse ár, Danish åre, Swedish åra.

Noun[edit]

ār f

  1. oar
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *airuz. Cognate with Old Saxon ēru, Old Norse árr, Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐍂𐌿𐍃 (airus).

Noun[edit]

ār m

  1. messenger, herald
    • 8th-11th century, Beowulf, ll. 335-6:
      Ic eom Hroðgares ar ond ombiht.
      I am Hrothgar's herald and officer.
  2. angel
  3. missionary
Declension[edit]

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *ɸare (in front of), from Proto-Indo-European *pr̥h₂í. Cognates include Ancient Greek παραί (paraí, beside) and Old English fore (modern English for and fore).

Preposition[edit]

ar (with accusative or dative)

  1. for, for the sake of, because of

For quotations using this term, see Citations:ar.

Inflection[edit]

Forms combined with the definite article:

  • masculine/feminine accusative singular: arin
  • neuter accusative singular: ara
  • dative singular all genders: arin(d), airind(í)
  • accusative plural all genders: arna
  • dative plural all genders: a(i)rnaib

Forms combined with a possessive determiner:

  • first person singular: armo
  • third person singular and plural: ara

Form combined with the relative particle: ara

Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

ar

  1. Alternative spelling of air (for, since)

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *anserom, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥serōm, from *nos (we, us); compare German unser.

Determiner[edit]

ar (triggers eclipsis)

  1. our
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 10c21
      Ba torad sa⟨í⟩thir dúun in chrud so ce du·melmis cech túari et ce du·gnemmis a ndu·gníat ar céli, act ní bad nertad na mbráithre et frescsiu fochricce as móo.
      It would be a fruit of labor for us in this way if we consumed every food and if we did what our fellows do, but it would not be a strengthening of the brothers and a hope of a greater reward.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 17b5
      Ammi túailṅge ar mbréthre.
      We are potent in our word.
      (literally, “We are of the ability of our word.”)
Descendants[edit]
  • Irish: ár
  • Scottish Gaelic: ar

Further reading[edit]


Old Portuguese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

from Latin re- (again).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ar

  1. also
  2. again

Descendants[edit]

  • Portuguese: er

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse ár, from Proto-Germanic *jērą.

Noun[edit]

ār n

  1. year

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Pnar[edit]

Pnar cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : ar
    Ordinal : wa ar

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Khasian *ʔaːr, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *ɓaar. Cognate with Khasi ar, Blang [La Gang] lál, Bahnar ʼbar, Khmer ពីរ (pii), Vietnamese hai, Santali ᱵᱟᱨ (bar).

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

ar

  1. (cardinal) two

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from French are.

Noun[edit]

ar m inan (abbreviation a)

  1. (metrology) are (square decametre, 100 m²)

Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

ar f pl

  1. genitive plural of ara

Further reading[edit]

  • ar in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ar in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese aar, aire, aere, from Latin āēr, from Ancient Greek ἀήρ (aḗr, air), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • IPA(key): (Caipira Brazil) /ˈaɹ/
  • Hyphenation: ar
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

ar m (plural ares)

  1. air
  2. look, air (aspect)

Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:ar.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From older Romanian ară, are, presumably from Latin habēret (for the singular) and habērent (for the plural). See also are.

Verb[edit]

(el/ea) ar (modal auxiliary, third-person singular form of avea, used with infinitives to form conditional tenses)

  1. (he/she) would

Verb[edit]

(ele/ei) ar (modal auxiliary, third-person plural form of avea, used with infinitives to form conditional tenses)

  1. (they) would

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

ar

  1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of ara

Etymology 3[edit]

From French are.

Noun[edit]

ar m (plural ari)

  1. an are (a unit of area equal to 100 square metres)
Declension[edit]

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish ar. Cognates include Irish ár

Determiner[edit]

ar (triggers eclipsis)

  1. our
    Tha ar nighean ruadh.Our daughter is red-haired.
    Tha ar n-oilthigh ùr.Our university is new.
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

ar (defective)

  1. think
Usage notes[edit]

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m (Cyrillic spelling ар)

  1. are (square decametre, 100 m²)

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Ultimately from Latin area, probably via French are. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun[edit]

ar c or n

  1. are (square decametre, 100 m²)
Declension[edit]
Declension of ar 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ar aren ar aren
Genitive ars arens ars arens
Declension of ar 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ar aret ar aren
Genitive ars arets ars arens
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *arô.

Noun[edit]

ar m

  1. (dialectal) eagle

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish عار(ar), from Arabic عَار(ʿār)

Noun[edit]

ar (definite accusative arı, plural arlar)

  1. feeling of shame

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French are.

Noun[edit]

ar (definite accusative arı, plural arlar)

  1. are (unit of area)

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh ar, from Proto-Brythonic *ar, from Proto-Celtic *ɸare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

ar (triggers soft mutation)

  1. on
  2. about to (with a verbal noun)
    • King, Gareth (1993) Modern Welsh: A Comprehensive Grammar (Routledge Grammars), London and New York: Routledge, →ISBN, page 131:
      Brysiwch, mae’r trên ar fynd!
      Hurry up, the train’s about to leave!

Inflection[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse ǫrn, from Proto-Germanic *arô.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ar m (definite singular arʼenn)

  1. Eagle[1], Aquila chrysaetos or Haliaeetus albicilla.[2]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ar

  1. Contraction of annar.
  2. Alternative spelling of ader

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rietz, Johan Ernst, “AR 2”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 12
  2. ^ Stenberg, Pehr, Widmark, Gusten Ordbok över Umemålet [Dictionary of the Umeå speech], →ISBN, page 7