infinitive

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Middle French infinitif, from Late Latin infinitivus ‎(unlimited, indefinite), from Latin infinitus ‎(unlimited, infinite)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈfɪnɪtɪv/, /ɪnˈfɪnətɪv/

Noun[edit]

infinitive ‎(plural infinitives)

Broom icon.svg A user suggests that this entry be cleaned up, giving the reason: “one has to differ between the abstract infinitive mode or mood (at least usually without plural), and concrete verbs in the infinitive (with plural); like: (a) the language X has four modes: infinitive, imperative, indicative, conjunctive; (b) the word X is an infitive or the infinitves X and Y”.
Please see the discussion on Requests for cleanup(+) for more information and remove this template after the problem has been dealt with.
  1. (grammar) A non-finite verb form considered neutral with respect to inflection; depending on language variously found used with auxiliary verbs, in subordinate clauses, or acting as a gerund, and often as the dictionary form.
  2. (grammar) A verbal noun formed from the infinitive of a verb.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Adjective[edit]

infinitive ‎(not comparable)

  1. (grammar) Formed with the infinitive.
  2. Unlimited; not bounded or restricted; undefined.
    • Cunningham's Sermons (quoted in 1823, The Edinburgh Christian Instructor, volume 23, page 328)
      [] to search out in some higher region of infinitive space a spot where it was impossible for defilement to follow them []

French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

infinitive

  1. feminine singular of infinitif

Noun[edit]

infinitive f

  1. infinitive clause (=proposition infinitive)

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

infinitive f

  1. feminine plural of infinitivo

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

īnfīnītīve

  1. vocative singular of īnfīnītīvus