ars

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See also: ARS, ARs, árs, ārs, and års

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

ars

  1. plural of ar

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

See ar (scar).

Noun[edit]

ars n

  1. indefinite genitive singular/plural of ar

Etymology 2[edit]

See ar (are).

Noun[edit]

ars c

  1. indefinite genitive singular/plural of ar

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥tís (fitting), from the root *h₂er- (to join). Cognates include Avestan 𐬀𐬭𐬆𐬌𐬙𐬌(arəiti, reward) and Ancient Greek ἄρτι (árti, just, exactly). Related to arma.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ars/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

ars f (genitive artis); third declension

  1. art, skill
  2. craft, power

Declension[edit]

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ars artēs
Genitive artis artium
Dative artī artibus
Accusative artem artēs
Ablative arte artibus
Vocative ars artēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • ars in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ars in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • abstruse studies: studia, quae in reconditis artibus versantur (De Or. 1. 2. 8)
    • (ambiguous) to have received a liberal education: optimis studiis or artibus, optimarum artium studiis eruditum esse
    • to teach some one letters: erudire aliquem artibus, litteris (but erudire aliquem in iure civili, in re militari)
    • system: ratio; disciplina, ratio et disciplina; ars
    • (ambiguous) the rules of art; aesthetics: artis praecepta, or also simply ars
    • to have no taste for the fine arts: abhorrere ab artibus (opp. delectari artibus)
    • the art of painting: ars pingendi, pictura (De Or. 2. 16. 69)
    • the art of sculpture: ars fingendi
    • the dramatic art: ars ludicra (De Or. 2. 20. 84)
    • the art of speaking; oratory: ars dicendi
    • to fool a person thoroughly: omnibus artibus aliquem ludificari, eludere
    • (ambiguous) to sleep soundly (from fatigue): arte, graviter dormire (ex lassitudine)
    • (ambiguous) to reduce a thing to its theoretical principles; to apply theory to a thing: ad artem, ad rationem revocare aliquid (De Or. 2. 11. 44)
    • (ambiguous) learning, scientific knowledge is flourishing: artium studia or artes vigent (not florent)
    • (ambiguous) to be interested in, have a taste for culture: optimarum artium studio incensum esse
    • (ambiguous) to have received a liberal education: optimis studiis or artibus, optimarum artium studiis eruditum esse
    • (ambiguous) to know nothing of logic: disserendi artem nullam habere
    • (ambiguous) theoretical, speculative philosophy: philosophia, quae in rerum contemplatione versatur, or quae artis praeceptis continetur
    • (ambiguous) to systematise: ad artem redigere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to systematise: ad rationem, ad artem et praecepta revocare aliquid (De Or. 1. 41)
    • (ambiguous) to have been reduced to a system: arte conclusum esse
    • (ambiguous) to be very intimately related: arte (artissime) coniunctum esse
    • (ambiguous) a work of art: artis opus; opus arte factum or perfectum
    • (ambiguous) to follow an artistic profession, practise an art: artem exercere
    • (ambiguous) to teach an art: artem tradere, docere
    • (ambiguous) to profess an art: artem profiteri
    • (ambiguous) a taste for the fine arts: artium (liberalium) studium, or simply studium
    • (ambiguous) the rules of art; aesthetics: artis praecepta, or also simply ars
    • (ambiguous) a connoisseur; a specialist: (artis, artium) intellegens, peritus (opp. idiota, a layman)
    • (ambiguous) to learn, study music: artem musicam discere, tractare
    • (ambiguous) to be very eloquent: dicendi arte florere
    • (ambiguous) to reduce law to a system: ius ad artem redigere
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 55

Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

ars

  1. 3rd person singular future indicative form of art
  2. 3rd person plural future indicative form of art

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English ærs, ears, from Proto-Germanic *arsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃érsos.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ars

  1. arse, anus
  2. bottom, buttocks
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French arz, artz, plural of art.

Noun[edit]

ars

  1. (rare in Late ME) plural of art ((area of) knowledge)

Old French[edit]

Verb[edit]

ars m (masculine plural ars, feminine singular arse, feminine plural arses)

  1. inflection of ardeir:
    1. oblique/nominative masculine singular participle
    2. oblique/nominative masculine plural past participle

Old Norse[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *arsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃érsos (arse)

Noun[edit]

ars m (genitive ars, plural arsar)

  1. the arse, anus

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

ars in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *arsaz.

Noun[edit]

ars m

  1. the arse; the buttocks or anus

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: ars
    • Low German: ars, ors; by contraction from forms of at the arse (am/an'n ars): nors, mors

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ārsus, past participle of ārdeō. Compare Italian arso, Aromanian arsu.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ars

  1. past participle of arde

Adjective[edit]

ars m or n (feminine singular arsă, masculine plural arși, feminine and neuter plural arse)

  1. burnt
  2. scorched, parched

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ars

  1. indefinite genitive singular of ar
  2. indefinite genitive plural of ar