opera

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Opéra Garnier in Paris

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian opera. Doublet of oeuvre.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɒp.əɹ.ə/, /ˈɒp.ɹə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɑ.pəɹ.ə/, /ˈɑ.pɹə/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

opera (countable and uncountable, plural operas or opere)

  1. (music) A theatrical work, combining drama, music, song and sometimes dance.
  2. (music) The score for such a work.
  3. A building designed for the performance of such works; an opera house.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter VI, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      “I don't mean all of your friends—only a small proportion—which, however, connects your circle with that deadly, idle, brainless bunch—the insolent chatterers at the opera, the gorged dowagers, [], the jewelled animals whose moral code is the code of the barnyard—!"
  4. A company dedicated to performing such works.
  5. (by extension) Any showy, melodramatic or unrealistic production resembling an opera.
  6. A collection of work; plural of opus.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Terms etymologically related to "opera"

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Azerbaijani[edit]

Noun[edit]

opera (definite accusative operanı, plural operalar)

  1. opera

Declension[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

opera

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of operar
  2. second-person singular imperative form of operar

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

opera f

  1. opera

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian opera, from Latin opera, plural of opus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈoː.pəˌraː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ope‧ra

Noun[edit]

opera f (plural opera's, diminutive operaatje n)

  1. opera

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From opero (opera) +‎ -a.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

opera (accusative singular operan, plural operaj, accusative plural operajn)

  1. of or relating to opera

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Italian opera, from Latin opera.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈopɛrɒ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ope‧ra

Noun[edit]

opera (plural operák)

  1. (music) opera (a theatrical work combining drama, music, song and sometimes dance)
    Synonyms: dalmű, zenedráma
  2. (music) opera, opera house (building designed for the performance of such works)
    Synonyms: operaház, dalszínház

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative opera operák
accusative operát operákat
dative operának operáknak
instrumental operával operákkal
causal-final operáért operákért
translative operává operákká
terminative operáig operákig
essive-formal operaként operákként
essive-modal
inessive operában operákban
superessive operán operákon
adessive operánál operáknál
illative operába operákba
sublative operára operákra
allative operához operákhoz
elative operából operákból
delative operáról operákról
ablative operától operáktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
operáé operáké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
operáéi operákéi
Possessive forms of opera
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. operám operáim
2nd person sing. operád operáid
3rd person sing. operája operái
1st person plural operánk operáink
2nd person plural operátok operáitok
3rd person plural operájuk operáik

Derived terms[edit]

Compound words

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin opera.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

opera f (plural opere)

  1. work
  2. means, help, services
  3. (music) opus
  4. (music) opera
  5. institution, institute, society

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

opera

  1. third-person singular present of operare
  2. second-person singular imperative of operare

Ladin[edit]

Noun[edit]

opera f (plural operes)

  1. work

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

opera

  1. nominative/accusative plural of opus

Noun[edit]

opera f (genitive operae); first declension

  1. work, exertion, effort
    • 44 BCE, Cicero, De Officiis 2.4.14:
      Quī dēnique ex bēstiīs frūctūs aut quae commoditās, nisi hominēs adiuvārent, percipī posset? Nam et quī prīncipēs inveniendī fuērunt, quem ex quāque bēluā ūsum habēre possēmus, hominēs certē fuērunt, nec hōc tempore sine hominum operā aut pāscere eās aut domāre aut tuērī aut tempestīvōs frūctūs ex iīs capere possēmus; ab eīsdemque et, quae nocent, interficiuntur et, quae ūsuī possunt esse, capiuntur.
      What produce of beasts, then, or what commodity could be obtained, if men didn't assist? For those that first found out what use we can have from each beast, were surely humans, and we cannot in the present either pasture them or break them in or take care of them or obtain the timely fruit from them without the labour of humans; and by the same are killed those who do harm and captured those that can be of use.
  2. service
  3. (especially with dare) care, attention bestowed on something (or someone, especially a teacher)
    1. with dative
      • c. 185 BCE – 159 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Heauton Timorumenos 1.1.58–60:
        Ego ĭstūc aetātis nōn amōrī operam dabam
        sed in Asiam hinc abiī propter pauperiem atque ibī
        simul rem et glōriam armīs bellī repperī.
        When I was your age I wasn't giving much attention to love
        but instead I left for Asia because of poverty and there
        I found fortune and glory by the arms of war.
      • 121 CE, Suetonius, De vita Caesarum 1.4.1:
        Cēterum, compositā sēditiōne cīvīlī, Cornēlium Dolabellam cōnsularem et triumphālem repetundārum postulāvit; absolūtōque Rhōdum sēcēdere statuit, et ad dēclīnandam invidiam et ut per ōtium ac requiem Apollōniō Molōnī clārissimō tunc dīcendī magistrō operam daret.
        Then, with the civil unrest quietened, he charged Cornelius Dolabella, former consul who had triumphed, with extortion; with him acquitted, he resolved to leave for Rhodes, to escape the hate as well as to pay attention in rest and recreation to Apollonius Molon, then the most distinguished teacher of speaking.
    2. (uncommon) with ad + accusative
      • c. 180 BCE, Plautus, Casina pro.21–22:
        Vōs omnīs opere magnō esse ōrātōs volō
        benignē ut operam dētis ad nostrum gregem.
        I want you all to be asked with great care
        to kindly give attention to our company of actors.
    3. with ut/ + subjunctive
      • c. 4 BCE – 65 CE, Seneca the Younger, De vita beata 2.3:
        Omnem operam dedī, ut mē multitūdinī ēdūcerem et aliquā dōte nōtābilem facerem.
        I took all the care to withdraw myself from the multitude and by some talent make myself distinguished.
      • c. 48 BCE, Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Civili 1.5.3:
        Dent operam cōnsulēs, praetōrēs, tribūnī plēbis—quīque prō cōnsulibus sunt ad urbem—nē quid rēs pūblica dētrimentī capiat.
        May the consuls, praetors, tribunes of the people—and those who are near the City—take care that nothing bad happens to the Republic.
    4. with the subjunctive alone
      • 62 BCE – 43 BCE, Cicero, Epistulae ad familiārēs 10.21.6:
        Ut exercitum locīs habeam opportūnīs, prōvinciam tuear, etiam sī ille exercitus descīerit, omniaque integra servem dabō operam, quoad exercitūs hōc summittātis parīque fēlīcitāte rem pūblicam hīc vindicētis.
        I shall take care to keep the army in suitable locations, to protect my province even if that army defects, and to preserve the whole position uncompromised, until you send armies to my support and defend the commonwealth with just as much success.
    5. (Old Latin, rare) with the infinitive
      • 165 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Hecyra 4.1.37–38:
        Sī modestē ac rārō haec fēcit, nōnne ea dissimulāre nōs
        magis hūmānum est quam dare operam id scīre, quī nōs ōderit?
        If he did these things reasonably and unfrequently, would it not be more human
        to turn a blind eye to that than take the trouble to find out, due to which he might hate us?
  4. (in the ablative and with possesive pronouns) one's fault, agency, doing
    • c. 200 BCE – 190 BCE, Plautus, Captivi 3.5.19–22:
      TYNDARUS. Fateor, omnia
      facta esse ita ut tū dīcis, et fallāciīs
      abiisse eum abs tē meā operā atque astūtiā;
      an, obsecrō hercle tē, id nunc suscēnsēs mihī?
      TYNDARUS. I confess that all
      were done just like you say, and by deceit
      he went away from you by my doing and astuteness;
      and, please, by Hercules, now you are inflamed at me?
  5. (Old Latin) (in the ablative, with experīrī) one's own experience
    • c. 195 BCE, Plautus, Trinummus 4.1.5–8:
      Atque ego, Neptūne, tibi ante aliōs deōs grātiās agō atque abeō summās;
      nam tē omnēs saevomque sevērumque atque āvidīs mōribus commemorant,
      spurcificum, immānem, intolerandum, vēsānum: contrā operā expertus,
      nam pol placidō tē et clementī meō ūsque modō, ut voluī, ūsus sum in altō.
      And I, Neptune, give thanks to you above other gods and in the highest;
      for all remember you cruel and strict and with the greediest character,
      obscene, frightful, intolerable, crazy: unlike how I've known you in my experience,
      for, by Pollux, in my own gentle and merciful way have I benefitted from you, as I wanted, at sea.
  6. (Old Latin) (with ūnā or eādem) manner, way
    • c. 200 BCE – 190 BCE, Plautus, Captivi 3.4.30–31:
      Et quidem Alcumeus atque Orestēs et Lycurgus posteā
      ūnā operā mihi sunt sodālēs quā iste.
      And then Alcumeus and Orestes and Lycurgus
      are my friends in the same manner as this one is.
  7. spare time for something (see #Usage notes)
    • c. 60 BCE – 54 BCE, Cicero, Epistulae ad Quīntum frātrem 3.4.4:
      Dē versibus quōs tibi ā mē scrībī vīs, dēest mihi quidem opera sed abest etiam ἐνθουσιασμός, quī nōn modo tempus sed etiam animum vacuum ab omnī cūrā dēsīderat.
      Regarding the verses which you want composed by me to you, I don't have the time, but the afflatus is absent too, which needs not only time but also a soul empty of every worry.
  8. a day's labour
    • 4 CEc. 70 CE, Columella, De Re Rustica 2.12.18:
      Cētera legūmina occupant operās sexāgintā, id est mēnsēs duōs.
      The other vegetables require sixty days' work, that is, two months.
  9. (metonymically) day labourer, farmhand
    • BCE 30, Horace, Satires 2.7.117–118:
      [] Ōcius hinc tē
      nī rapis, accēdēs opera agrō nōna Sabīnō.
      [] If you don't make off
      from here faster, you'll become the ninth farmhand on the Sabine field.
    1. (by extension) any kind of worker
      • c. 77 CE – 79 CE, Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia 33.72–73:
        Et tamen in silice facilior existimātur opera; est namque terra ex quōdam argillae genere glāreā mixta—gangadiam vocant—prope inexpugnābilis. Cuneīs eam ferreīs adgrediuntur et īsdem malleīs, nihilque dūrius putant, nisi quod inter omnia aurī famēs dūrissima est. Perāctō opere cervīcēs fornicum ab ultimō caedunt. Dat signum rīma, eamque sōlus intellegit in cacūmine eius montis vigil. Hic vōce, nūtū ēvocārī iubet operās pariterque ipse dēvolat. Mōns frāctus cadit ab sēsē longē fragōre quī concipī hūmānā mente nōn possit, aeque et flātū incrēdībilī. Spectant victōrēs ruīnam nātūrae. Nec tamen adhūc aurum est nec sciēre esse, cum fōderent, tantaque ad perīcula et inpendia satis causae fuit sperāre quod cuperent.
        And still the work is considered to be easier in flint; for there is earth, consisting of some kind of clay, mixed with gravel—they call it gangadia—almost impenetrable. They approach it with iron wedges and with the same hammer machines [as above], and they consider nothing harder, save for the fact that hunger for gold is the hardest among all things. With the work done, they cut down the supports of the arched roofs beginning from the last one. A fissure gives the sign, and only the watchman in the peak of that mountain notices it. He orders by voice and by gesture the miners to be called outside, and rushes down in the same manner. At a distance, the mountain, broken, falls by itself with a crash which cannot be conceived by the human mind, and with an incredible blast as well. The victors watch the ruin of nature. And the gold is not even there yet, nor did they know whether there was any when they were digging, and hoping for what they desired was enough of a reason to go through all these dangers and expenses.
    2. (derogatory, politics) hired aider, tool, rowdy
      • 121 CE, Suetonius, De vita Caesarum 2.3.1:
        C. Octāvius pater a prīncipiō aetātis et rē et existimātiōne magnā fuit, ut equidem mīrer hunc quoque ā nōnnūllīs argentārium atque etiam inter dīvīsōrēs operāsque campestrēs prōditum; amplīs enim innūtrītus opibus honōrēs et adeptus est facile et ēgregiē administrāvit.
        The father Gaius Octavius was from the beginning of his age of great wealth as well as reputation, so that I wonder that he too is alleged by some to have been a money-changer and even among the electoral bribe distributors and aiders in the Campus Martius; for, brought up with ample riches, he obtained honours with ease as well as administering them excellently.
  10. deed, activity, effort
    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 41.4.6:
      Ante omnēs īnsignis operā fuit C. Popilī equitis; Sabellō cognōmen erat. Is pede sauciō relictus longē plūrimōs hostium occīdit.
      More distinguished than others in deeds was Gaius Popilius the knight; Sabello was his cognomen. He, left behind with a wounded leg, killed the most enemies by far.
  11. handiwork
    • c. 209 CE, Plautus, Asinaria 2.4.18–19:
      Iussīn, sceleste, ab iānuā hoc stercus hinc auferrī?
      Iussīn columnīs dēicī operās araneōrum?
      Didn't I order, you scoundrel, this dung to be carried away from the door?
      Didn't I order the handiwork of spiders to be removed from the columns?

Usage notes[edit]

The word, in its 'spare time' meaning, is frequently used in the ante-classic period, and especially by Plautus, in the locution operae esse, meaning 'to be worth the time'. Later on, it is characteristic of Livy's style and of the archaising tendencies of Silver Latin.

    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 4.8.3:
      Ortum autem initium est reī, quod in populō per multōs annōs incēnsō neque differrī cēnsus poterat neque cōnsulibus, cum tot populōrum bella imminerent, operae erat id negōtium agere.
      The beginning of the office appeared because in the people devastated in the course of many years neither could a census be held, nor was it worth the time of the consuls when wars from so many tribes were threatening.

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative opera operae
Genitive operae operārum
Dative operae operīs
Accusative operam operās
Ablative operā operīs
Vocative opera operae

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • opera in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • opera in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • opera in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to take care of one's health: valetudini consulere, operam dare
    • to take great pains in order to..: studiose (diligenter, enixe, sedulo, maxime) dare operam, ut...
    • to expend great labour on a thing: egregiam operam (multum, plus etc. operae) dare alicui rei
    • to expend great labour on a thing: operam alicui rei tribuere, in aliquid conferre
    • to expend great labour on a thing: operam (laborem, curam) in or ad aliquid impendere
    • to exert oneself very energetically in a matter: multum operae ac laboris consumere in aliqua re
    • to spare no pains: labori, operae non parcere
    • to lose one's labour: operam (et oleum) perdere or frustra consumere
    • it is worth while: operae pretium est (c. Inf.)
    • to become a pupil, disciple of some one: operam dare or simply se dare alicui, se tradere in disciplinam alicuius, se conferre, se applicare ad aliquem
    • let the consuls take measures for the protection of the state: videant or dent operam consules, ne quid res publica detrimenti capiat (Catil. 1. 2. 4)
    • (ambiguous) to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: omni ope atque opera or omni virium contentione eniti, ut
    • (ambiguous) designedly; intentionally: de industria, dedita opera (opp. imprudens)
    • (ambiguous) to let out public works to contract: locare opera publica
    • (ambiguous) to raise siege-works: opera facere

Latvian[edit]

Noun[edit]

opera f (4 declension)

  1. opera

Declension[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Italian opera (per musica)

Noun[edit]

opera m (definite singular operaen, indefinite plural operaer, definite plural operaene)

  1. an opera
  2. an opera house (also operahus)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Italian opera (per musica)

Noun[edit]

opera m (definite singular operaen, indefinite plural operaer or operaar, definite plural operaene or operaane)

  1. an opera
  2. an opera house (also operahus)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From Italian opera, from Latin opera.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

opera f

  1. (music) opera (theatrical work)
  2. (architecture) opera house (building)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • opera in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • opera in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /o.ˈpɛ.ɾa/
  • Hyphenation: o‧pe‧ra
  • Rhymes: -ɛra

Verb[edit]

opera

  1. third-person singular present indicative of operar
  2. second-person singular imperative of operar

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Italian opera, from Latin opera.

Noun[edit]

ȍpera f (Cyrillic spelling о̏пера)

  1. opera

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

opera

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of operar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of operar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of operar.

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

opera c

  1. an opera; a musical theatre play
  2. an opera house; an institution or building where opera is performed

Declension[edit]

Declension of opera 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative opera operan operor operorna
Genitive operas operans operors operornas

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish ópera (opera).

Noun[edit]

óperá

  1. (music) opera

Etymology 2[edit]

From Spanish operar (to operate).

Verb[edit]

óperá

  1. to surgically operate

Derived terms[edit]