ure

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See also: Ure, urë, üre, and -ure

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman *eure, Old French uevre (modern French œuvre), from Latin opera (work, labor). Doublet of oeuvre and opera.

Noun[edit]

ure (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, only in collocations in ure, out of ure) use, practise, exercise.
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ure (third-person singular simple present ures, present participle uring, simple past and past participle ured)

  1. (obsolete, transitive, intransitive) To use; to exercise; to inure; to accustom by practice.
    • 1551, Ralph Robinson (translator), Utopia (1516) by Thomas More, edited by William Dallam Armes, New York: Macmillan, 1912, Book 1, p. 37,[4]
      [] the French soldiers [] from their youth have been practised and ured in feats of arms []

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin ūrus. Perhaps a doublet of owre.

Noun[edit]

ure (plural ures) (rare)

  1. Synonym of aurochs
    • 1864, “Species of Cattle, and Origin of the Domesticated Cattle”, in Eighteenth Annual Report of the Ohio State Board of Agriculture, with an Abstract of the Proceedings of the County Agricultural Societies: to the General Assembly of Ohio, for the Year 1863, Columbus: Richard Nevins, pages 365, 366, 368:
      The Auer or Ure ox or European Bison, (bos urus, bonasus, bison,) is one of the largest oxen, and distinguished by a curly manelike product about the head and neck, by a very broad, arched forehead, and by moderate horns situated far apart, and being curved inward and upward in the shape of a crescent. [] Some extracts from his work are here presented, because the opinion hitherto prevailing in certain circles that our common cattle were the offspring of the Ure; but according to these extracts it will be seen that several striking anatomical differences are found to exist between the Ure and our common cattle. [] The Ure has fourteen vertebræ, and as many pairs of ribs, or one pair more than common cattle, but has only five lumbar vertebræ of which the common cattle have six. [] In the old Ure, there was found in the midst of the two seminal passages, vessels, a single duct, shaped somewhat like a bag, one inch in diameter and four and a half inches in length, which is divided in front and at the top into two arching branches, like the horns of the uterus of the cow, extending as channels of 3 to 4 inches in width to the testicle, and there terminating in a cul-de-sac. [] From the above it appears that the origin of the domesticated cattle and their original native country is, as yet, not fully ascertained. Formerly the ure was considered the parent of the same, but this is improbable on account of the anatomical differences between the ure and the common cattle.
    • 1911, S. Baring-Gould, “Chapter VIII. The Fils Thal”, in The Land of Teck and Its Neighbourhood;  [], London: John Lane, The Bodley Head; New York: John Lane Company, pages 176–177:
      In the Nibelungen Lied both beasts, also the giant elk, are spoken of as not extinct when that poem was written:— / Then slew he speedily a Wisent and an Elk, / Strong Ures and a giant stag (Schelch). / Cæsar describes the ure as “little smaller than an elephant, but in appearance like an ox, of great strength and speed; it never suffers itself to be tamed, and spares no man it sees. To have killed an ure is held in highest honour among the Germans, and its horns, set in silver, serve as drinking vessels at their carouses.”
    • 1952, Ochrona przyrody[5], volume 20, pages 32, 33:
      The history of extinction of an animal has rarely been so rich in documents of all kinds as the history of the Ure or Aurochs, the second big-game representative of the bovine family in Europe, and one of the most remarkable species of wild oxen in the world. The special high interest attached to this animal is due to the fact that it is generally admitted to be the ancestral form of most European cattle breeds. The Ure ceased to exist in early historical times, though a small number of individuals survived in Poland as late as the XVII century. [] From the very early times, the first mention being that of 1510, the herds of Bos primigenius were under the protection and custody of special game-rangers who were free of all other occupation, as well as of all tax-paying, and were to look only after the wild Ures, feeding them in winter with hay collected from the adjoining meadows, and bringing back to the forest the individuals that occasionally went astray.
Usage notes[edit]

Ure-ox is more common; compare aurochs (ultimately from Old High German ūrohso, from ūro (aurochs) + ohso (ox)).

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ure

  1. plural of uur

Ainu[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ure (Kana spelling ウレ)

  1. (anatomy) foot
    Synonym: cikiri

Ambai[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

ure

  1. eye

Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

ure n

  1. indefinite plural of ur

Eastern Arrernte[edit]

Noun[edit]

ure

  1. fire

References[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ure

  1. Rōmaji transcription of うれ

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

ūre

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of ūrō

Middle English[edit]

Determiner[edit]

ure

  1. Alternative form of oure (our)

Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • ūserNorthumbrian or poetic

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *unsar, from Proto-Germanic *unseraz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

ūre

  1. our

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: oure

Pronoun[edit]

ūre

  1. genitive of : ours, of us

Rapa Nui[edit]

Noun[edit]

ure

  1. penis

Usage notes[edit]

Largely considered archaic; replaced by a Tahitian term.