us

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English us, from Old English ūs (us, dative personal pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *uns (us), from Proto-Indo-European *ne-, *nō-, *n-ge-, *n̥smé (us). Cognate with Saterland Frisian uus (us), West Frisian us, ús (us), Low German us (us), Dutch ons (us), German uns (us), Danish os (us), Latin nōs (we, us).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (stressed) enPR: ŭs, IPA(key): /ʌs/, IPA(key): /ʌz/
  • (unstressed) (US) IPA(key): /əs/, (UK) IPA(key): /əs/, /əz/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Pronoun[edit]

us

  1. (personal) Me and at least one other person; the objective case of we.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Luke 1:1:
      Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us...
  2. (Commonwealth of Nations, colloquial, chiefly with give) Me.
    Give us a look at your paper.
    Give us your wallet!
    She's turned the weans against us!
  3. (Northern England) Our.
    We'll have to throw us food out.
Alternative forms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Determiner[edit]

us

  1. The speakers/writers, or the speaker/writer and at least one other person.
    It's not good enough for us teachers.
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Derived from the similarity between the letter u and the Greek letter µ.

Symbol[edit]

us

  1. Alternative spelling of µs: microsecond
    • 2002, Peter Spasov, Microcontroller Technology, the 68HC11, p. 489:
      ;wait 500 us
    • 2012, Peter Feiler and David Gluch, Model-Based Engineering with AADL:
      The standard units are ns (nanoseconds), us (microseconds), ms (milliseconds), sec (seconds), min (minutes), and hr (hours).
    • 2014, Michael Corey, Jeff Szastak, and Michael Webster, Virtualizing SQL Server with VMware: Doing IT Right, p. 198:
      Because the flash devices are local to the server, the latencies can be microseconds (us) instead of milliseconds (ms) and eliminate some traffic that would normally have gone over the storage network.

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

us

  1. plural of u
Usage notes[edit]
  • There is some difference of opinion regarding the use of apostrophes in the pluralization of references to letters as symbols. New Fowler's Modern English Usage, after noting that the usage has changed, states on page 602 that "after letters an apostrophe is obligatory." The 15th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style states in paragraph 7.16, "To avoid confusion, lowercase letters ... form the plural with an apostrophe and an s". The Oxford Style Manual on page 116 advocates the use of common sense.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan us, from Latin ūsus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

us (proclitic and contracted enclitic, enclitic vos)

  1. you (plural, direct or indirect object)
  2. Contraction of vos.

Usage notes[edit]

  • us is the reinforced (reforçada) form of the pronoun. It is used before verbs.
    Si us plau.Please.
    Si no us importa.If you don't mind.
  • -us is the reduced (reduïda) form of the pronoun. It is used after verbs ending with vowel.
    Volia veure-us.I wanted to see you.

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French us, from Latin ūsus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

us m pl (plural only)

  1. (plural only) mores; traditional practices or manners

Usage notes[edit]

Only used in Modern French as us et coutumes (mores and customs). Also see the etymologically related usage.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

us

  1. Romanization of 𐌿𐍃

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ūs (us, dative personal pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *uns (us), from Proto-Indo-European *ne-, *nō-, *n-ge-, *n-sme- (us).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

us (nominative we)

  1. First-person plural accusative pronoun: us.
  2. (reflexive) ourselves.
  3. (reciprocal) each other.

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: us
  • Scots: us, hus
  • Yola: ouse

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Middle Low German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ûs or us

  1. (personal pronoun, dative, accusative) Alternative form of uns.
  2. (possesive pronoun) Alternative form of uns.

Declension[edit]

Possesive pronoun:


Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French uis, from Latin ostium.

Noun[edit]

us m (plural us)

  1. door

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *uns, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥s, *nes. Cognates include Old Frisian ūs (West Frisian ús), Old Saxon ūs (Low German os, ons), Dutch ons, Old High German uns (German uns), Old Norse oss (Swedish oss), Gothic 𐌿𐌽𐍃 (uns). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin nos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ūs

  1. accusative/dative of : (to) us

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ūsus.

Noun[edit]

us m (oblique plural us, nominative singular us, nominative plural us)

  1. tradition or custom

Descendants[edit]

  • French: us

Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *uns, *unsiz. Cognates include Old English ūs, Old Saxon ūs and Old Dutch uns.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ūs

  1. accusative/dative of

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • North Frisian:
    Most dialects: üs
    Sylt: üüs
  • Saterland Frisian: uus
  • West Frisian: ús

References[edit]

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *ǫsъ.

Noun[edit]

ȕs f (Cyrillic spelling у̏с)

  1. fishbone

References[edit]

  • us” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *us (mind, reason).[1]

Noun[edit]

us (definite accusative usa, plural uslar)

  1. mind
  2. reason
  3. intelligence

Declension[edit]

Inflection
Nominative us
Definite accusative usu
Singular Plural
Nominative us uslar
Definite accusative usu usları
Dative usa uslara
Locative usta uslarda
Ablative ustan uslardan
Genitive usun usların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular usum uslarım
2nd singular usun usların
3rd singular usu usları
1st plural usumuz uslarımız
2nd plural usunuz uslarınız
3rd plural usları usları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular usumu uslarımı
2nd singular usunu uslarını
3rd singular usunu uslarını
1st plural usumuzu uslarımızı
2nd plural usunuzu uslarınızı
3rd plural uslarını uslarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular usuma uslarıma
2nd singular usuna uslarına
3rd singular usuna uslarına
1st plural usumuza uslarımıza
2nd plural usunuza uslarınıza
3rd plural uslarına uslarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular usumda uslarımda
2nd singular usunda uslarında
3rd singular usunda uslarında
1st plural usumuzda uslarımızda
2nd plural usunuzda uslarınızda
3rd plural uslarında uslarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular usumdan uslarımdan
2nd singular usundan uslarından
3rd singular usundan uslarından
1st plural usumuzdan uslarımızdan
2nd plural usunuzdan uslarınızdan
3rd plural uslarından uslarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular usumun uslarımın
2nd singular usunun uslarının
3rd singular usunun uslarının
1st plural usumuzun uslarımızın
2nd plural usunuzun uslarınızın
3rd plural uslarının uslarının

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Starostin, Sergei; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg (2003) , “*us”, in Etymological dictionary of the Altaic languages (Handbuch der Orientalistik; VIII.8), Leiden, New York, Köln: E.J. Brill

Tz'utujil[edit]

Noun[edit]

us

  1. fly (insect)

Volapük[edit]

Adverb[edit]

us

  1. there

West Frisian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

us

  1. object of wy