los

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Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin illōs, from ille.

Article[edit]

los m pl (masculine sg el, feminine sg la, neuter sg lo, feminine plural les)

  1. (definite) the

Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin illōs; cf. els.

Pronoun[edit]

los (enclitic, contracted 'ls, proclitic els)

  1. them (masculine, direct or indirect object)
  2. them (feminine, indirect object only)
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Article[edit]

los m pl

  1. masculine plural of lo

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Common Slavic word, from Proto-Slavic *ȏlsь ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁el-.[1][2] Cognate with English elk, German Elch.

Noun[edit]

los m anim

  1. elk (British), moose (U.S.)

Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from German Los, which has unclear origins.[3][4]

Noun[edit]

los m inan

  1. lottery ticket

Declension[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "los¹" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007
  2. ^ "los 1°" in Václav Machek, Etymologický slovník jazyka českého, second edition, Academia, 1968
  3. ^ "los²" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007
  4. ^ "los 2°" in Václav Machek, Etymologický slovník jazyka českého, second edition, Academia, 1968

Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Adjective[edit]

los

  1. loose

Noun[edit]

los c (singular definite lossen, plural indefinite losser)

  1. lynx

Inflection[edit]

Noun[edit]

los n (singular definite losset, plural indefinite los)

  1. kick

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lɔs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔs

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch los, from Old Dutch *los, from Proto-Germanic *lusaz.

Adjective[edit]

los (comparative losser, superlative meest los or lost)

  1. loose
  2. separate
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of los
uninflected los
inflected losse
comparative losser
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial los losser het lost
het loste
indefinite m./f. sing. losse lossere loste
n. sing. los losser loste
plural losse lossere loste
definite losse lossere loste
partitive los lossers
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

los

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lossen
  2. imperative of lossen

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch los, from Old Dutch *los, from Proto-Germanic *luhsuz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (light, to shine) or from a substrate language.[1] Cognate with Old Saxon lohs, Old High German luhs, Old English lox, from a similar Germanic form also Swedish lodjur. Cognates outside Germanic include Ancient Greek λύγξ (lúnx), Lithuanian lūšis, Old Church Slavonic роусь (rusĭ), Old Irish lug, Old Armenian լուսանունք (lusanunkʿ).

Noun[edit]

los m (plural lossen, diminutive losje n)

  1. (dated) lynx (specifically the Eurasian lynx, Lynx lynx)
Alternative forms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philippa, Marlies; Debrabandere, Frans; Quak, Arend; Schoonheim, Tanneke; van der Sijs, Nicoline (2003–2009), “lynx”, in Etymologisch woordenboek van het Nederlands (in Dutch), Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press

Dutch Low Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Saxon lōs, from Proto-Germanic *lausaz, cognate with Dutch los and English loose.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

los

  1. open

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French, from Latin laus, laudem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

los m (plural los)

  1. (obsolete) praise; acclaim

Synonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /loːs/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /lɔs/ (regionally; chiefly as interjection or when meaning “going on”)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old High German lōs.

Adjective[edit]

los (comparative loser, superlative am losesten)

  1. (colloquial or dated) Alternative form of lose (loose)

Adverb[edit]

los (only used in combination with a verb)

  1. off, rid of
    Ich bin meine Erkältung los.
    I've got rid of my cold.
  2. going on
    Hier ist einiges los.
    There's a lot going on here.
  3. (colloquial, regional, Westphalia, Lower Saxony) open
    Die Tür stand los.The door stood open.

Interjection[edit]

los

  1. come on!, let's go!
    Los! An die Arbeit!
    Come on! Let's get to work!

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

los

  1. Imperative singular of losen.

Indonesian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Shortening from losmen (hostel).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /los/
  • Hyphenation: los

Noun[edit]

los

  1. hostel

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch loods (pilot).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /los/
  • Hyphenation: los

Noun[edit]

los

  1. (navigation) pilot boat

Etymology 3[edit]

From Dutch los (loose).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /los/
  • Hyphenation: los

Adjective[edit]

los

  1. (colloquial) loose

Further reading[edit]


Interlingua[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

los

  1. (accusative, dative) them, those

Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French loche (dialectal)

Noun[edit]

los

  1. slug

References[edit]

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. (1987). Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *los, from Proto-Germanic *lusaz.

Adjective[edit]

los

  1. loose, free
  2. free, not encumbered
  3. having lost, robbed

Inflection[edit]

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • los”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • los (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Low German lots (short form of lotsman); compare with German Lotse.

Noun[edit]

los m (definite singular losen, indefinite plural loser, definite plural losene)

  1. (nautical) a pilot (person who guides ships in and out of a harbour)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Low German lots (short form of lotsman).

Noun[edit]

los m (definite singular losen, indefinite plural losar, definite plural losane)

  1. (nautical) a pilot (as above)

References[edit]


Novial[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

los

  1. they (all male); them (all male)

Related terms[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin illōs, from ille.

Article[edit]

los (singular lo, feminine la, feminine plural las)

  1. the; masculine plural definite article

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *lusą (loss), from Proto-Indo-European *lewHs- (to cut loose; sever; lose). Cognate with Old Norse los (looseness; breaking up).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

los n (nominative plural los)

  1. loss
  2. destruction

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

See the verb loer (to laud).

Noun[edit]

los m (oblique plural los, nominative singular los, nominative plural los)

  1. glory; positive reputation

Descendants[edit]


Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *lausaz, whence also Old English lēas, Old Norse lauss.

Adjective[edit]

lōs

  1. loose

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German lōz, from Old High German hlōz, from Proto-Germanic *hlautiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

los m inan

  1. fate
  2. lottery ticket

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • los in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

los

  1. Alternative form of os (third-person masculine plural objective pronoun) used as an enclitic and mesoclitic following a verb form ending in a consonant (-z, -r and -s, but not -m); the consonant is elided and the preceding vowel takes an accent if necessary

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *ôlsь.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lȍs m (Cyrillic spelling ло̏с)

  1. moose
  2. elk

Declension[edit]


Slovene[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

lós m anim (genitive lósa, nominative plural lósi)

  1. elk, moose

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin illōs accusative plural masculine of ille.

Article[edit]

los m pl

  1. the
    ¿Qué hacen los muchachos?
    "What do the boys do?"
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

los

  1. Accusative of ellos and ustedes (when referring to more than one man); them, you all (formal)
  2. Plural masculine or neuter pronoun, e.g. los que no hablan, "those who do not speak"

See also[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

los

  1. indefinite genitive singular of lo

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Low German lots (short form of lotsman); compare with German Lotse.

Noun[edit]

los m (definite singular losn, dative singular losåm, indefinite plural losa, definite plural losan)

  1. (nautical) a pilot (person who guides ships in and out of a harbour)

Derived terms[edit]


White Hmong[edit]

Verb[edit]

los

  1. come, return (to one's home / to a place where one resides)

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Ernest E. Heimbach, White Hmong - English Dictionary (1979, SEAP Publications)

Zazaki[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Armenian լոշ (loš).

Noun[edit]

los (genitive singular losi)

  1. lavash