lass

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: laß, lȧss, and låss

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English lasse, from Old Norse laskura (an unmarried woman, maiden). Cognate with Scots lassie.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /læs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æs

Noun[edit]

lass (plural lasses)

  1. (archaic in some dialects, informal) A young woman or girl.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:girl
    Coordinate term: lad
    Come and dance, ye lads and lasses!
  2. (Tyneside, Mackem) A sweetheart.

Usage notes[edit]

Still prevalent in Scottish English, Irish English, North East England, and Yorkshire. Sometimes used poetically in other dialects of English.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN
  • lass” in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “lass”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • Frank Graham (1987) The New Geordie Dictionary, →ISBN
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [2]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

lass

  1. singular imperative of lassen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of lassen

Further reading[edit]

  • lass” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • lass” in Duden online

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German lōs, from Old High German *los, variant of lōs (loose; free; lacking; sly, deceitful). Compare for the short vowel Ripuarian Central Franconian loss, Dutch los. The uninflected stem of this adjective develops regularly into Luxembourgish lass, while the inflected stem yields the doublet lues (slow, quiet). See the English cognate loose for more.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lass (masculine lassen, neuter lasst, comparative méi lass, superlative am lassten)

  1. loose, unattached

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Yola[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English los, from Old English los.

Noun[edit]

lass

  1. loss

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

lass

  1. Alternative form of lhose
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 2:
      Th' lass ee chourch-hey.
      The less in the churchyard.

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 52 & 84