abandon

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See also: Abandon and a bandon

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /əˈbæn.dən/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: aban‧don

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

abandon (third-person singular simple present abandons, present participle abandoning, simple past and past participle abandoned)

  1. (transitive) To give up or relinquish control of, to surrender or to give oneself over, or to yield to one's emotions. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470)][1]
    • 1856, Thomas Babington Macaulay, The History of England from the Accession of James II. Volume 3, page 312:
      [] he abandoned himself [] to his favourite vice.
  2. (transitive) To desist in doing, practicing, following, holding, or adhering to; to turn away from; to permit to lapse; to renounce; to discontinue. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470)][1]
    • 2013 May 17, George Monbiot, “Money just makes the rich suffer”, in The Guardian Weekly[1], volume 188, number 23, page 19:
      In order to grant the rich these pleasures, the social contract is reconfigured. []   The public realm is privatised, the regulations restraining the ultra–wealthy and the companies they control are abandoned, and Edwardian levels of inequality are almost fetishised.
  3. (transitive) To leave behind; to desert, as in a ship, a position, or a person, typically in response to overwhelming odds or impending dangers; to forsake, in spite of a duty or responsibility. [First attested in the late 15th century.][1]
    Many baby girls have been abandoned on the streets of Beijing.
    She abandoned her husband for a new man.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To subdue; to take control of. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the mid 16th century.][1]
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To cast out; to banish; to expel; to reject. [Attested from the mid 16th century until the mid 17th century.][1]
  6. (transitive) To no longer exercise a right, title, or interest, especially with no interest of reclaiming it again; to yield; to relinquish. [First attested in the mid 18th century.][1]
    I hereby abandon my position as manager.
  7. (transitive) To surrender to the insurer (an insured item), so as to claim a total loss.
Conjugation[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

abandon (countable and uncountable, plural abandons)

  1. A yielding to natural impulses or inhibitions; freedom from artificial constraint, with loss of appreciation of consequences. [Early 19th century.][1][3]
    • 1954, Gore Vidal, Messiah:
      I envy those chroniclers who assert with reckless but sincere abandon: 'I was there. I saw it happen. It happened thus.'
    • 2007 November 4, David M. Halbfinger, “The City That Never Sleeps, Comatose”, in The New York Times[3]:
      They needed to have an abandon in their performance that you just can’t get out of people in the middle of the night when they’re barefoot.
  2. (obsolete) abandonment; relinquishment.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors (2002), “abandon”, in The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 2.
  2. ^ Christine A. Lindberg, editor (2002), “abandon”, in The Oxford College Dictionary, 2nd edition, New York, N.Y.: Spark Publishing, →ISBN, page 1.
  3. ^ Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], →ISBN), page 2.

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French (mettre) a bandon ("to deliver, place at someone's disposition", literally "to place in someone's power"). Gamillscheg suggests a derivation from a ban donner, but the Trésor de la langue française considers this unlikely, as the phrase is not attested.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abandon m (plural abandons)

  1. surrender
  2. abandonment
  3. (uncountable) complete neglect

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Norwegian Bokmål: abandon

Further reading[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

abandon m (plural abandons)

  1. abandonment

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French abandon.

Adverb[edit]

abandon

  1. (not comparable) Freely; entirely.
    • 1330, Arthour and Merlin:
      His ribbes and scholder fel adoun / Men might se the liver abandoun.
      His ribs and shoulder fell down / Men might see the liver entirely.

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French abandon (surrender, abandonment), from Old French mettre a bandon (to deliver, place at someone's disposition), last part from Frankish *ban, *bann, from Proto-Germanic *bannaną (to proclaim, command, summon, ban), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to speak, say).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /abaŋˈdɔŋ/, /abanˈdɔŋ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔŋ
  • Hyphenation: a‧ban‧don

Noun[edit]

abandon m (definite singular abandonen, indefinite plural abandoner, definite plural abandonene)

  1. (law) the right to, under certain circumstances, waive ownership of an insured ship or cargo to the insurer and claim compensation for total loss
  2. (obsolete) indifference
    • 1917, Ludvig Daae, Paul Botten Hansen, page 64:
      [Botten Hansen] skrev med saa stor abandon, at mere end een troskyldig læser indigneredes paa hans vegne
      [Botten Hansen] wrote with such great abandon that more than one innocent reader was indignant on his behalf
    • 1992, Olaf Bull, Ild og skygger, page 101:
      den evige varme pludringen hos denne damen, med intelligente smaa «abandoner» i tanken, denne uendelige «bjerg- og dalbane» i tanken
      the eternal hot chatter of this lady, with intelligent little "abandons" in the tank, this endless "roller coaster" in the tank

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

From French abandon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

abandon m inan

  1. (law, nautical) the legal waiving of rights to one's ship that has lost trade value

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • abandon in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • abandon in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French abandon.

Noun[edit]

abandon n (plural abandonuri)

  1. abandonment
  2. renouncement

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]