abjure

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: abjuré

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English abjuren, from Latin abiūrō (deny upon oath) (possibly via Middle French abjurer), formed from ab (from, away from) + iūro (swear or take an oath), from iūs (law, right, duty).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /æbˈdʒʊɹ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʊə(ɹ)

Verb[edit]

abjure (third-person singular simple present abjures, present participle abjuring, simple past and past participle abjured)

  1. (transitive) To renounce upon oath; to forswear; to disavow. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][2]
    • 1786, William Beckford, Vathek; an Arabian Tale:
      adore then the terrestrial influences, and abjure Mahomet.
    To abjure allegiance to a prince.
    To abjure the realm (to swear to abandon it forever).
  2. (transitive, obsolete, historical) To cause one to renounce or recant. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][2]
  3. (transitive) To reject with solemnity; to abandon forever; to repudiate; to disclaim. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][2]
    To abjure errors.
  4. (transitive) To abstain from; to avoid; to shun.
    • 1902, Robert Marshall Grade, The Haunted Major
      Except during the season in town, she spends her year in golfing, either at St Magnus or Pau, for, like all good Americans, she has long since abjured her native soil.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], →ISBN), page 3
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors (2002), “abjure”, in The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 5.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

abjure

  1. inflection of abjurer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

abjure

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of abjurar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of abjurar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of abjurar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of abjurar

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /abˈxuɾe/, [aβ̞ˈxu.ɾe]

Verb[edit]

abjure

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of abjurar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of abjurar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of abjurar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of abjurar.