banal

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See also: banał

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French banal (held in common, relating to feudal service, by extension commonplace), from Old French banel, related to Medieval Latin bannālis (subject to feudal authority), from bannus (jurisdiction), both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *bannaną (order, summon, forbid). See also ban, abandon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

banal (comparative more banal or banaler, superlative most banal or banalest)

  1. Common in a boring way, to the point of being predictable; containing nothing new or fresh.
    Synonyms: everyday, prosaic; see also Thesaurus:hackneyed, Thesaurus:boring
    Antonyms: new, original
    • 2013, Mark Ruffalo as Dan, Begin Again, written by John Carney:
      One of the most banal scenes is suddenly invested with so much meaning! All these banalities - They're suddenly turned into these… these beautiful, effervescent pearls. From Music.
  2. (uncommon, historical) Relating to a type of feudal jurisdiction or service.
    • 1926, Thomas Guérin, Feudal Canada: The Story of the Seigniories of New France, page 72:
      They arrived in 1732, and were distributed gratis to the more important banal mills.
    • 1984, C. Warren Hollister, “War and Diplomacy in the Anglo-Norman world: the reign of Henry I”, in Anglo-Norman Studies VI: Proceedings of the Battle Conference, 1983, page 79:
      French historians have viewed these policies as efforts to replace the banal authority inherited from the Carolingians []
    • 2002, Wim Blockmans; Peter Hoppenbrouwers, Introduction to Medieval Europe 300–1500, page 138:
      To what extent were banal lords accountable to a prince or a king for their unrestricted exercise of public authority?

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

banal m

  1. bramble
  2. broom (a plant, sp. Genista)

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French banal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

banal (masculine and feminine plural banals)

  1. banal (common in a boring way)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From ban +‎ -al, related to Medieval Latin bannālis, from bannus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

banal (feminine singular banale, masculine plural banals, feminine plural banales)

  1. banal; commonplace

Adjective[edit]

banal (feminine singular banale, masculine plural banaux, feminine plural banales)

  1. (law) public
  2. (historical) relating to facilities owned by feudal lords
    un four banal, un moulin banal
    a commonplace oven, a commonplace mill

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German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

banal (comparative banaler, superlative am banalsten)

  1. banal

Declension[edit]

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Indonesian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Malay banal, from Dutch banaal, from French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

Adjective[edit]

banal

  1. banal (common)

Luxembourgish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

banal (masculine banalen, neuter banaalt, comparative méi banal, superlative am banaalsten)

  1. banal

Declension[edit]


Malay[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch banaal, from French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

banal

  1. banal (common)
    Synonym: basi

Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

banal m or f (plural banais, comparable)

  1. banal (common)
  2. hackneyed (repeated too often)
    Synonyms: batido, trivial

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

banal (plural banales)

  1. banal

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective[edit]

banal

  1. pious