trivial

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

  • From Latin triviālis (appropriate to the street-corner, commonplace, vulgar), from trivium (place where three roads meet). Compare trivium, trivia.
  • From the distinction between trivium (the lower division of the liberal arts; grammar, logic and rhetoric) and quadrivium (the higher division of the seven liberal arts in the Middle Ages, composed of geometry, astronomy, arithmetic, and music).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɹɪ.vi.əl/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

trivial (comparative more trivial, superlative most trivial)

  1. Ignorable; of little significance or value.
    • 1848, Thackeray, William Makepeace, Vanity Fair, Bantam Classics (1997), 16:
      "All which details, I have no doubt, Jones, who reads this book at his Club, will pronounce to be excessively foolish, trivial, twaddling, and ultra-sentimental."
    • 2019, Li Huang; James Lambert, “Another Arrow for the Quiver: A New Methodology for Multilingual Researchers”, in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, DOI:10.1080/01434632.2019.1596115, page 11:
      In fact, the influence of signage in a certain area may exist anywhere on a continuum from profoundly effective to utterly trivial or completely insignificant, irrespective of the intent motivating the signs.
  2. Commonplace, ordinary.
    • 1842, Thomas De Quincey, Cicero (published in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine)
      As a scholar, meantime, he was trivial, and incapable of labour.
  3. Concerned with or involving trivia.
  4. (taxonomy) Relating to or designating the name of a species; specific as opposed to generic.
  5. (mathematics) Of, relating to, or being the simplest possible case.
  6. (mathematics) Self-evident.
  7. Pertaining to the trivium.
  8. (philosophy) Indistinguishable in case of truth or falsity.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

trivial (plural trivials)

  1. (obsolete) Any of the three liberal arts forming the trivium.
    • c. 1521, John Skelton, “Speke Parott”:
      Tryuyals, & quatryuyals, ſo ſore now they appayre
      That Parrot the Popagay, hath pytye to beholde
      How the reſt of good lernyng, is roufled vp & trold
    • 1691, [Anthony Wood], Athenæ Oxonienses. An Exact History of All the Writers and Bishops who have had Their Education in the Most Ancient and Famous University of Oxford from the Fifteenth Year of King Henry the Seventh, Dom. 1500, to the End of the Year 1690. [], volume (please specify |volume=I or II), London: [] Tho[mas] Bennet []:
      St. Edmund was bred in this University in the Trivials and Quadrivials till he was Professor of Arts

References[edit]

trivial in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trivial (masculine and feminine plural trivials)

  1. trivial

Further reading[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trivial (feminine singular triviale, masculine plural triviaux, feminine plural triviales)

  1. trivial (common, easy, obvious)
  2. ordinary, mundane
  3. colloquial (language)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Galician[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trivial m or f (plural triviais)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Derived terms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French trivial, from Latin triviālis (common).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trivial (comparative trivialer, superlative am trivialsten)

  1. trivial (common, easy, obvious)

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Piedmontese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trivial

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trivial m or f (plural triviais, comparable)

  1. trivial

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • trivial” in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French trivial.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trivial m or n (feminine singular trivială, masculine plural triviali, feminine and neuter plural triviale)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɾiˈbjal/, [t̪ɾiˈβ̞jal]
  • Hyphenation: tri‧vial

Adjective[edit]

trivial (plural triviales)

  1. trivial

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]