levis

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Levis, Lévis, and Levi's

Esperanto[edit]

Verb[edit]

levis

  1. past of levi

Ido[edit]

Verb[edit]

levis

  1. past of levar

Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Italic *leɣʷis (with possible contamination from *breɣʷis), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lengʰwih₂-, from *h₁léngʰus, from *h₁lengʷʰ- (lightweight). Cognates include Sanskrit लघु (laghú), Ancient Greek ἐλᾰφρός, ἐλᾰχῠ́ς (elaphrós, elakhús) and Old English lēoht (English light).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

levis (neuter leve, comparative levior, superlative levissimus, adverb leviter); third-declension two-termination adjective

  1. (literally) light, not heavy
    c. 52 BCE, Julius Caesar, Commentarii de Bello Gallico 2.10:
    levis armaturae Numidas
    the light-armed Numidians
    Antonym: gravis
  2. (transferred sense)
    1. (usually poetic) easy to digest
    2. quick, swift, fleet, nimble, rapid
      Synonyms: agilis, alacer, pernīx
      Antonym: lentus
    3. (usually poetic) slight, trifling, small
      8 CE, Ovid, Metamorphoses 4.180:
      levis tactus
      a slight, gentle touch
  3. (figuratively)
    1. (Classical Latin) light, trivial, trifling, unimportant, inconsiderable, slight, little, petty, easy, dispensable
      c. 54 CE, Seneca the Younger, Phaedra 607:
      Curae leues locuntur, ingentes stupent.
      Trivial concerns talk, great ones are speechless.
    2. light, light-minded, capricious, fickle, inconstant, unreliable, false
    3. (rare) mild, gentle, pleasant
Quote-alpha.png This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!
Inflection[edit]

Third-declension two-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative levis leve levēs levia
Genitive levis levium
Dative levī levibus
Accusative levem leve levēs
levīs
levia
Ablative levī levibus
Vocative levis leve levēs levia
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Uncertain. Possibly from Proto-Italic *lēiwis, from Proto-Indo-European *leh₁y-u- (smooth) and cognate to Ancient Greek λεῖος (leîos, smooth, plain, level, hairless, soft), Ancient Greek λίς (lís, smooth).[1] Or from Proto-Indo-European *h₂leyH- (to smear) and cognate to Latin līmus (mud, slime, muck), English slime, Ancient Greek λίμνη (límnē, marsh).

Likely cognate to Latin oblīvīscor (forget).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lēvis (neuter lēve); third-declension two-termination adjective

  1. (literally, Classical Latin) smooth, not rough, smoothed, shining, rubbed
    Antonym: asper
    1. (poetic) slippery
      29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 5.328:
      levi cum sanguine Nisus labitur infelix
    2. (poetic) without hair, beardless
      Synonym: imberbis
    3. (poetic) youthful, delicate, beautiful; finely dressed, spruce, effeminate
  2. (transferred sense, rare) rubbed smooth, ground down, softened, soft
  3. (Classical Latin, rare) (of speech) smooth, flowing
Quote-alpha.png This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!
Inflection[edit]

Third-declension two-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative lēvis lēve lēvēs lēvia
Genitive lēvis lēvium
Dative lēvī lēvibus
Accusative lēvem lēve lēvēs
lēvīs
lēvia
Ablative lēvī lēvibus
Vocative lēvis lēve lēvēs lēvia
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • levis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • levis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • levis in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • levis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a man of character, with a strong personality: vir constans, gravis (opp. homo inconstans, levis)
    • light infantry: milites levis armaturae
    • (ambiguous) men of sound opinions: homines graves (opp. leves)
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “lēvis”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 336-337