mendax

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Derived from Proto-Indo-European *mend- (to fault), whence mendum and menda.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

mendāx (genitive mendācis, comparative mendācior, superlative mendācissimus, adverb mendāciter); third-declension one-termination adjective

  1. deceitful, lying, deceptive, untruthful, false, mendacious, feigned, not real.

Declension[edit]

Note that mendāce is an alternative form for the ablative singular mendācī

Third-declension one-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative mendāx mendācēs mendācia
Genitive mendācis mendācium
Dative mendācī mendācibus
Accusative mendācem mendāx mendācēs mendācia
Ablative mendācī mendācibus
Vocative mendāx mendācēs mendācia

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: mendacious
  • Italian: mendace
  • Portuguese: mendace, mendaz
  • Spanish: mendaz

Noun[edit]

mendāx m (genitive mendācis); third declension

  1. liar

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mendāx mendācēs
Genitive mendācis mendācum
Dative mendācī mendācibus
Accusative mendācem mendācēs
Ablative mendāce mendācibus
Vocative mendāx mendācēs

References[edit]

  • mendax in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mendax in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mendax in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Julius Pokorny (1959), Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch, in 3 vols, Bern, München: Francke Verlag