lying

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

lie (to rest in a horizontal position) +‎ -ing.

Verb[edit]

lying

  1. present participle of lie (to rest in a horizontal position).
    • 1811, Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility 19:
      Without shutting herself up from her family ... or lying awake the whole night to indulge meditation, Elinor found every day afforded her leisure enough to think of Edward.

Noun[edit]

lying (plural lyings)

  1. The act of one who lies, or keeps low to the ground.
    • 1854, Saint Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, Psalm LXIV, translated by Philip Schaff et al.
      But whom could the lyings in wait of the human heart escape?
Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

lie (to intentionally give false information) +‎ -ing.

Verb[edit]

lying

  1. present participle of lie (to intentionally give false information).

Noun[edit]

lying (plural lyings)

  1. An act of telling a lie or falsehood.
    • 1653, Jeremy Taylor, “Twenty-five Sermons Preached at Golden Grove; Being for the Winter Half-year, []: Sermon XX. [Apples of Sodom; or, The Fruits of Sin.] Part II.”, in Reginald Heber, editor, The Whole Works of the Right Rev. Jeremy Taylor, D.D. [], volume V, London: Ogle, Duncan, and Co. []; and Richard Priestley, [], published 1822, OCLC 956524510, page 298:
      [W]hether a man would fain be pleased with sin, or be quiet and fearless when he hath sinned, or continue in it, or persuade others to it, he must do it by false propositions, by lyings, and such weak discourses as none can believe but such as are born fools, or such as have made themselves so, or are made so by others.
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lying (not generally comparable, comparative more lying or lyinger, superlative most lying or lyingest)

  1. Tending to tell lies, untruthful, mendacious
    • Shakespeare, The Second Part of King Henry the Sixth, Act 2 scene 1:
      Gloster: Then, Saunder, sit there, the lyingest knave in Christendom.
    • Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Induction scene 2:
      Sly: Ask Marian Hacket, the fat ale-wife of Wincot, if she know me not: if she say I am not fourteen pence on the score for sheer ale, score me up for the lyingest knave in Christendom.
    • 1998, Charlotte Vale Allen, Mixed Emotions[1], Island Nation Press LLC, →ISBN:
      “God, how you lie, skinny! You’re about the lyingest woman I’ve ever met. I’ll be damned if I’ll keep on asking questions when it’s plain as day you’re not about to give out any answers.

Further reading[edit]

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