lye

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See also: lyé and -lye

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English lēag, from Proto-Germanic *laugō, from Proto-Indo-European *lewh₃- (to wash).

Noun[edit]

lye (countable and uncountable, plural lyes)

  1. An alkaline liquid made by leaching ashes (usually wood ashes).
  2. Potassium or sodium hydroxide (caustic soda).
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb[edit]

lye (third-person singular simple present lyes, present participle lyeing or lying, simple past and past participle lyed)

  1. To treat with lye.

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

lye (plural lyes)

  1. (Britain, rail transport) A short side line, connected with the main line; a turn-out; a siding.
    • 1962 October, G. Freeman Allen, “The New Look in Scotland's Northern Division—II: The new Perth marshalling yard”, in Modern Railways, page 273, photo caption with indicating arrow:
      Brakevan lye. [same page in the main text] There is also an inclined lye for brakevans at each end of the yard.

Verb[edit]

lye (third-person singular simple present lyes, present participle lying, simple past lay, past participle lain or layn)

  1. Obsolete spelling of lie.
    • 1687, [John Dryden], “(please specify the page number(s))”, in The Hind and the Panther. A Poem, in Three Parts, 2nd edition, London: Printed for Jacob Tonson [], OCLC 460679539:
      But when his foe lyes prostrate on the plain,
      He sheaths his paws, uncurls his angry mane;
      And, pleas'd with bloudless honours of the day,
      Walks over, and disdains th' inglorious Prey.
    • 1654, John Donne, Loves Diet
      Now negligent of sports I lye,
      And now as other Fawkners use,
      I spring a mistresse, sweare, write, sigh and weepe:
      And the game kill'd, or lost, goe talk, and sleepe.

References[edit]

lye in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hlýja, from the adjective hlýr.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • lya (a infinitive)

Verb[edit]

lye (present tense lyer, past tense lydde, past participle lydd/lytt, passive infinitive lyast, present participle lyande, imperative ly)

  1. to warm up, give off warmth

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

lye (present tense lyar or lyer, past tense lya or lydde, past participle lya or lydd, present participle lyande)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of lyde.

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Adjective[edit]

lye

  1. inflection of ly:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]