ly

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See also: Ly, LY, , , -ly, .ly, ly., and ly-

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

ly (plural lys)

  1. (astronomy) Abbreviation of light-year.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch lijden, from Middle Dutch liden, from Old Dutch līthan, from Proto-Germanic *līþaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ly (present ly, present participle lydende, past participle gely)

  1. to suffer

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Ultimately from Latin ille, probably reborrowed from a vernacular Romance language.

Article[edit]

ly (definite)

  1. the (only in very specific circumstances)
    • 13th c., Thomas Aquinas, Scriptum super Sententiis
      Quia ly "se" potest esse ablativi casus... (Since the "se" can be in the ablative case...)

Usage notes[edit]

  • In nearly all circumstances, Latin does not use articles. "Ly" is not used to indicate the definiteness of a noun, but rather to indicate that the following word is being mentioned rather than used. As such, "ly <word>" can be accurately translated as "the word <word>" in most cases. "Ly" is only found in medieval and later Latin.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ly n (definite singular lyet, indefinite plural ly, definite plural lya or lyene)

  1. shelter

Vietnamese[edit]

Noun[edit]

ly

  1. Alternative spelling of li

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hlýr, from Proto-Germanic *hliwjaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /lyː/, /løʏ̯ː/, [lí͡ʷː], [lǿ͡ʷɪ̯͡ʷː(j)]

Adjective[edit]

ly (neuter lytt)

  1. lukewarm
    lytt vär
    warm weather
  2. (of the elements) calm, quiet
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
  • lytt (calm, quiet)
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hlýða, from Proto-Germanic *hliuþijaną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ly (preterite lydd, supine lydt)

  1. to hear, listen
Derived terms[edit]
  • lydt (audible, susceptible to sounds; calm, windless, so that sounds from far away can be heard.)