ch

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Translingual[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Letter[edit]

ch (mixed case Ch, upper case CH)

  1. A digraph from c and h, considered an individual letter in some languages.

Symbol[edit]

ch

  1. Alternative form of cosh (hyperbolic cosine)



English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

ch

  1. Abbreviation of chain - a unit of measurement equal to 22 yards

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese チャンネル (channeru), from English channel.

Noun[edit]

ch

  1. (Japan) Abbreviation of channel

Etymology 3[edit]

Aphetic form of ich, utch, ultimately from Old English (I). Compare Dutch 'k, an aphetic variant of ik (I). More at ich, I.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ch

  1. (obsolete, dialectal) Alternative form of I

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Letter[edit]

ch (lower case, upper case CH, mixed case Ch)

  1. A digraph, the fourteenth letter of the Czech alphabet, after h and before i.

Usage notes[edit]

In names or at the beginning of a sentence the mixed case Ch is used (e. g. Chrudim).


Esperanto[edit]

Letter[edit]

ch

  1. A digraph used in the h-sistemo to represent ĉ.

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Abbreviation of chaque (each).

Adjective[edit]

ch (invariable)

  1. ea (each)

Etymology 2[edit]

Abbreviation of cheval-vapeur (horsepower).

Noun[edit]

ch m (plural ch)

  1. hp (horsepower)

Hungarian[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 Ch (digráf) on Hungarian Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (on its own) IPA(key): [ˈt͡seːɦaː]
  • (within words) IPA(key): /xː/, /t͡ʃ/, /ç/, /çː/, /h/, /k/, /ʃ/ (depending on the word)

Letter[edit]

ch (lower case, upper case Ch)

  1. A digraph used in several Hungarian words, as well as in some surnames, given names, and geographical names.

Usage notes[edit]

It is used (among others) in the following words, along with their derivations and compounds: Achilles-ín, allochton, acháj, achát, akrosztichon, almanach, anarchia/​​anarchikus/​anarchista/​anarchizmus, archaikus/​archaizál/​archaizmus, archeológia/​archeológus, archimandrita, architektúra, archivál/​archivális/​archívum, autochton, bacchanália, bacchánsnő, baldachin, barchesz, barkochba/​barkochbázik, bronchitisz, cech, chanti, charleston, charta, charter, chartizmus, chata, chianti, chorijambus, chripka, couchette, disztichon, durchmars, echó, echt, eucharisztia/​eucharisztikus, eunuch, exarcha, fach, franchise, gaucho, gouache, guttapercha, hierarchia/​​hierarchikus, hipochonder/​hipochondria, ichtioszaurusz, jacht, kapitälchen, [ krach, lichthóf, macher, machiavellizmus, machináció/machinál, malachit, mannlicher, matriarchátus, mazochista/​mazochizmus, mechanika/​​mechanikus/​​mechanisztikus/​mechanizál/​mechanizmus, mettlachi, moloch, monarchia/​monarchikus/​monarchista, oligarcha/​oligarchia/​oligarchikus, orchidea, patriarcha/​patriarchális/​patriarchátus, pech/​peches, poncho, poncichter, psziché/​pszichiáter/​pszichiátria/​pszichikai/​pszichikum/​pszicho-/​​pszichózis, richtig, rizskoch, sarlach, stich, strichel, szacharin, szinekdoché, sztrichnin, technika/​technikum/​technikus/​technokrácia/​technokrata/​​technológia/​technológus, trachoma, trocheus, vlach, winchester.

Officially recognized given names: Achilles, Achillesz, Áchim, Archibald, Joachim, Melchior, Orchidea, Psziché, Ráchel, Richárd.[1]

Surnames (a selection from notable people[2]): Aulich, Damjanich, Forgách, Keglevich, Knézich, Kovách, Laczkovich, Madách, Maderspach, Orlay Petrich, Széchenyi, Széchényi, Zách, Zichy.

Geographical names (along with their derivations, e.g. chilei): Charlestown, Chatham-szigetek, Chile, Chișinău, Déli-Georgia és Déli-Sandwich-szigetek, Liechtenstein, Nouakchott, Seychelle-szigetek as well as two settlements in Hungary, Chernelházadamonya and Zichyújfalu, a hill in Budapest, Széchenyi-hegy (named after István Széchenyi) and a neighborhood in Budapest, Széchenyihegy (named after the hill).

Declension[edit]

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative ch ch-k
accusative ch-t ch-kat
dative ch-nak ch-knak
instrumental ch-val ch-kkal
causal-final ch-ért ch-kért
translative ch-vá ch-kká
terminative ch-ig ch-kig
essive-formal ch-ként ch-kként
essive-modal
inessive ch-ban ch-kban
superessive ch-n ch-kon
adessive ch-nál ch-knál
illative ch-ba ch-kba
sublative ch-ra ch-kra
allative ch-hoz ch-khoz
elative ch-ból ch-kból
delative ch-ról ch-król
ablative ch-tól ch-któl
non-attributive
possessive - singular
ch-é ch-ké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
ch-éi ch-kéi
Possessive forms of ch
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. ch-m ch-im
2nd person sing. ch-d ch-id
3rd person sing. ch-ja ch-i
1st person plural ch-nk ch-ink
2nd person plural ch-tok ch-itok
3rd person plural ch-juk ch-ik

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Nyelvtudományi Intézet által anyakönyvi bejegyzésre alkalmasnak minősített utónevek jegyzéke (’List of first names qualified by the Research Institute for Linguistics as appropriate for registration on a birth certificate’). Regularly updated. For searchable unformatted lists, see férfinevek for masculine names and női nevek for feminine names.
  2. ^ Személyekről elnevezett budapesti utcanevek évfordulók tükrében (’Street names in Budapest named after persons, as reflected in anniversaries’) by György Mészáros

Latvian[edit]

Letter[edit]

ch (lower case, upper case CH, mixed case Ch)

  1. (obsolete) a letter used in older, pre-World-War-II Latvian spelling, but now replaced everywhere by h (upper case H)

Usage notes[edit]

This letter can still be found in older books, or in books written by the Latvian diaspora prior to the fall of the Soviet Union. It used to represent the sound of IPA symbol /x/, as distinct from /h/; but since these sounds have merged as /x/ in current Latvian pronunciation, <h> (= /x/) is now used in all cases.


Slovak[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Letter[edit]

ch (upper case Ch)

  1. The sixteenth letter of the Slovak alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ch in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Spanish[edit]

Letter[edit]

ch (lower case, upper case CH, mixed case Ch)

  1. che, the former fourth letter of the Spanish alphabet, after c and before d

Usage notes[edit]

Since 1994, this letter has been treated as c followed by h for collation (sorting) purposes only. In 2010, this letter was officially removed by the RAE from the Spanish alphabet.


Uzbek[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Letter[edit]

ch (upper case Ch)

  1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Uzbek alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Letter[edit]

ch (lower case, upper case Ch)

  1. The fourth letter of the Welsh alphabet, called èch and written in the Latin script. It is preceded by C and followed by D.

Usage notes[edit]

Like the other Welsh digraphs, ch is considered a distinct letter of the Welsh alphabet for all purposes, including collation. Thus, chwech is alphabetically sorted after cyllell.

Mutation[edit]

  • ch cannot be mutated in Welsh.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “ch”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies