hu

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hu (third-person singular, epicene, nominative case, reflexive huself)

  1. (neologism) they (singular). Gender-neutral third-person singular subject pronoun, coordinate with gendered pronouns he and she.
    • 2002 January 3, McMahon, Bryan T., quoting Sasha Newborn, “A terrible book”, in The Ponchatoula Times[1], page 7:
      Hu is fond of enigmas, of conundrums, of hieroglyphics; exhibiting in hus solutions of each and all a degree of acumen which appears to the ordinary apprehension preternatural.
    • 2003 October 14, Epstein, Mikhail, “"Hu," from "human," as a gender-neutral pronoun”, in , Usenet[2], message-ID <f732cdb7.0310141153.6c715df8@posting.google.com>:
      When the lecturer arrives, hu will be speaking on the topic of anonymity.
    • 2005, Shivery, Jake, “Why Hu would be a nice word to have”, in hupronoun.org[3], retrieved 2011-10-31:
      As previously mentioned, this can be faintly disenchanting, particularly to someone who feels that hu is already well spoken.
    • 2007 November 29, Epstein, Mikhail, “hu”, in International Society for Universal Dialog[4]:
      It's the vice-president's job to support the president and take hus place when hu is away.
    • 2008 March, Hitz, Christoph, “Hu, Me?”, in Mother Jones[5], ISSN 0362-8841:
      Maybe, but if his/herstory's any guide, hu has hu work cut out for hu.
  2. (neologism) them (singular). Gender-neutral third-person singular object pronoun, coordinate with gendered pronouns him and her.
    • 2006, Anderson, Perry; Burgess, Glenn, DeLuna, D. N., editor, The Political Imagination in History: Essays Concerning J.G.A. Pocock[6], Owlworks, ISBN 978-1934084021, page 175:
      One of his favorite metaphors for the historian, drawn from the "Preface" to Hegel's Philosophy of Right, likens hu to the owl of Minerva, whose flight at dusk provided the setting for mature reflection on the day that had passed.
  3. (neologism) their (singular). Gender-neutral third-person singular possessive adjective, coordinate with his and her.
    • 2006 October 1, “He said, she said, hu said”, in Los Angeles Times[7]:
      Now, however, the editorial writer has a new weapon in hu arsenal.
    • 2006 November 17, Kyff, Rob, “Hu Joins Heesh As Neutral Pronoun”, in Hartford Courant[8]:
      If hu doesn't do hu homework, I will fail hu.

Hyponyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Abau[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hu

  1. water

References[edit]

  • transnewguinea.org, citing D. C. Laycock, Languages of the Lumi Subdistrict (West Sepik District), New Guinea (1968), Oceanic Linguistics, 7 (1): 36-66

Akan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hu

  1. to see
  2. to discern, to descry, to find

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kotey, Paul Amon (2007) Twi-English/English-Twi Dictionary. New York: Hippocrene Books. ISBN 978-0-7818-0264-2

Albanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *skuna, from *skun-o- (compare Norwegian/Faroese skon ‘snout’), from Proto-Indo-European *skeud-.[1] More at hedh.

Noun[edit]

hu m (indefinite plural hunj, definite singular huri)

  1. wooden post, fencepost
  2. stake, picket
  3. pole, stilt
  4. (colloquial) penis

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Adam Hyllested, “Albanian hundë ‘nose’ and Faroese, SW Norwegian skon ‘snout’”, in Proceedings of the 23rd Annual UCLA Indo-European Conference (Bremen: Hempen, 2012), 73-81.

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hugr

Interjection[edit]

hu

  1. An expression of eeriness, horror or a very strong emotion

Noun[edit]

hu c (singular definite huen, not used in plural form)

  1. inclination, sympathy

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

hu

  1. imperative of hue

Esperanto[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hu

  1. oh, ooh, oof, wow (indicating surprise or another strong emotion)

German[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hu

  1. an exclamation of feeling cold

Further reading[edit]

  • hu in Duden online

Kriol[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English who.

Pronoun[edit]

hu

  1. (interrogative) who

Lower Sorbian[edit]

Preposition[edit]

hu (with genitive)

  1. Obsolete spelling of wu

Maltese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic هُوَ (huwa)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hu

  1. he

Inflection[edit]


Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

hu

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Determiner[edit]

hu

  1. Alternative spelling of u

Pronoun[edit]

hu

  1. Alternative spelling of u; accusative and dative of gi

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hwō. Cognate with Old Frisian , Old Saxon (Dutch hoe), Old High German wuo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. how

Conjunction[edit]

  1. how

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Onomatopoeia.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hu

  1. a shouting noise made when pursuing someone or something

Noun[edit]

hu m (oblique plural hus, nominative singular hus, nominative plural hu)

  1. commotion; racket (noisy situation)

References[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hwō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hu

  1. how

Conjunction[edit]

hu

  1. how

Synonyms[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hón.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /hʉː/, /heʊ̯ː/, /hʊ/, /hœ/

Pronounun[edit]

hu (accusative na or hänner, dative hänner or henar, genitive hännars or henars)

  1. she, it (third person singular, feminine)
Usage notes[edit]

Hu is used to refer not only to feminine persons, but any feminine noun.

Synonyms[edit]
See also[edit]


Etymology 2[edit]

Compare Norwegian Nynorsk ho, hoe

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hu f

  1. female

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse húð, from Proto-Germanic *hūdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *kuHtis.

Noun[edit]

hu f

  1. hide; pelt
Related terms[edit]