dy

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See also: Dy, , , d.y., d'y, and dy.

Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch dij, from Middle Dutch die, from Old Dutch *thio, from Proto-Germanic *þeuhą.

Noun[edit]

dy (plural dye, diminutive dytjie)

  1. thigh

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Albanian *duwō, from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

dy

  1. (cardinal) two

Related terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Verb[edit]

dy (imperative dy, infinitive at dy, present tense dyr, past tense dyede, perfect tense har dyet)

  1. (reflexive) to restrain oneself, to help oneself
    • 2012, Richard Russo, Åndernes rige, Klim ISBN 9788771292039
      Han er egentlig for klog til det, men han kan ikke dy sig.
      He is actually too clever for it, but he cannot help himself.
    • 2010, Mette Winge, Et udestående: - en provisorietidsroman, Gyldendal A/S ISBN 9788702102765
      Han var lige ved at tilføje at der ikke havde været anført noget om sagen i de franske aviser, men han dyede sig, for politiinspektøren hørte ikke til dem man opmuntrede med vitser.
      He was just about to add that there had been no note of the case in the French papers, but he restrained himself, for the police inspector did not belong to those people that one cheered up with jokes.
    • 2009, Hanne Reintoft, Hjertebånd, ArtPeople ISBN 9788771088410
      De havde dyet sig og nøjedes med den tilmålte ration uden at stikke fingrene hverken i slunkne melsække eller halvtomme sulekar.
      They had restrained themselves and made do with the measured ration without sticking their fingers in lacking flour bags, nor in half-empty meat jars.

Egyptian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably an Upper Egyptian dialect doublet of ꜥꜣ (here, there).

Adverb[edit]

d
y
N31
  1. here, there [Late Egyptian]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Loprieno, Antonio (1995) Ancient Egyptian: A Linguistic Introduction, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-44384-9

Lojban[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Cmavo[edit]

dy (selma'o BY2 BY2)

  1. letteral for d

Middle French[edit]

Verb[edit]

dy

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dire

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

dy c

  1. mud, mire, sludge

Declension[edit]


Traveller Norwegian[edit]

Numeral[edit]

dy

  1. (cardinal) two

Related terms[edit]


Vilamovian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

dy (definite, feminine and plural form of dyr)

  1. The; declined form of dyr

Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

dy

  1. your (singular)

Usage notes[edit]

Dy triggers the soft mutation. Di is often heard after the noun.


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Frisian thī, from Proto-Germanic *þiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

dy

  1. you (familiar object singular)
    Ik hâld fan dy. -- I love you

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare Dutch die

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

dy

  1. that (singular, common gender)
  2. those (plural)

See also[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse því, possibly from the instrumental interrogative Proto-Germanic *hwī (how, with what), with the initial h- replaced by the þ- from the forms of *sa.

Pronoun[edit]

dy

  1. dative singular of he