dye

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See also: d'ye

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English deie, from Old English dēah, dēag (color, hue, dye), from Proto-Germanic *daugō (colour, shade), from *dauganą, *dug- (to conceal, be dark), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewh₂- (to smoke, raise dust, camouflage). Cognate with Old High German tougan (dark, secretive), tougal (dark, hidden, covert), Old English dēagol, dīegle (dark, hidden, secret), Old English dohs, dox (dusky, dark). See dusk.

The verb is from Middle English deien, from Old English dēagian, from the noun.

Yarn colored with dye. The yarn has been dyed.

Noun[edit]

dye (countable and uncountable, plural dyes)

  1. A colourant, especially one that has an affinity to the substrate to which it is applied.
  2. Any hue, color, or blee.

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Verb[edit]

dye (third-person singular simple present dyes, present participle dyeing, simple past and past participle dyed)

  1. (transitive) To colour with dye, or as if with dye.
    • 1983, Richard Ellis, The Book of Sharks, Knopf, →ISBN, page 164:
      If indeed sharks were inclined to eat people, the world's oceans would be dyed crimson with the blood of millions.

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Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

dye (plural dyce)

  1. Alternative spelling of die (singular of dice)
    • 1748. David Hume, Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 46:
      If a dye were marked with one figure or number of spots on four sides, and with another figure or number of spots on the two remaining sides, it would be more probable, that the former would turn up than the latter;

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Afrikaans[edit]

Noun[edit]

dye

  1. plural of dy

Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French dieu (god).

Noun[edit]

dye

  1. god