dusk

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English[edit]

Dusk

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English dosk, duske (dusky, adj.), from Old English dox (dark, swarthy), from Proto-Germanic *duskaz (dark, smoky), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂s- (compare Old Irish donn (dark), Latin fuscus (dark, dusky), Sanskrit धूसर (dhūsara, dust-colored)), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewh₂- (smoke, mist, haze). More at dye. Related to dust.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dʌsk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌsk

Noun[edit]

dusk (countable and uncountable, plural dusks)

  1. A period of time at the end of day when the sun is below the horizon but before the full onset of night, especially the darker part of twilight.
  2. A darkish colour.

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

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Hyponyms[edit]

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See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

dusk (third-person singular simple present dusks, present participle dusking, simple past and past participle dusked)

  1. (intransitive) To begin to lose light or whiteness; to grow dusk.
  2. (transitive) To make dusk.
    • 1601, Philemon Holland, The Historie of the World, commonly called the Naturall Historie (originally by Pliny the Elder)
      After the sun is up, that shadow which dusketh the light of the Moone must needs be under the earth.

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dusk (comparative dusker, superlative duskest)

  1. Tending to darkness or blackness; moderately dark or black; dusky.

See also[edit]

  • dusk at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Adjective[edit]

dusk

  1. Alternative form of dosk