sore

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See also: söre and -sore

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sor, from Old English sār (ache, wound, noun) and sār (painful, grievous, adjective), from Proto-Germanic *sairą (noun) (compare Dutch zeer (sore, ache), Danish sår (wound)), and *sairaz (sore, adjective) (compare German sehr (very)), from Proto-Indo-European *sh₂eyro-, enlargement of *sh₂ey- (to be fierce, afflict) (compare Hittite [script needed] (sāwar, anger), Welsh hoed (pain), Ancient Greek αἱμωδία (haimōdía, sensation of having teeth on edge)).

Adjective[edit]

sore (comparative sorer, superlative sorest)

  1. Causing pain or discomfort; painfully sensitive.
    Her feet were sore from walking so far.
  2. Sensitive; tender; easily pained, grieved, or vexed; very susceptible of irritation.
    • Tillotson
      Malice and hatred are very fretting and vexatious, and apt to make our minds sore and uneasy.
  3. Dire; distressing.
    The school was in sore need of textbooks, theirs having been ruined in the flood.
  4. (informal) Feeling animosity towards someone; annoyed or angered.
    Joe was sore at Bob for beating him at checkers.
  5. (obsolete) Criminal; wrong; evil.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sore (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Very, excessively, extremely (of something bad).
    They were sore afraid.  The knight was sore wounded.
    • 1859, Alfred Tennyson, “Elaine”, in Idylls of the King, London: Edward Moxon & Co., [], OCLC 911789798, pages 174–175:
      But on that day when Lancelot fled the lists, / His party, knights of utmost North and West, / Lords of waste marches, kings of desolate isles, / Came round their great Pendragon, saying to him / 'Lo, Sire, our knight thro' whom we won the day / Hath gone sore wounded, and hath left his prize / Untaken, crying that his prize is death.'
    • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], “The Old Punt: A Curious ‘Turnpike’”, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175, pages 19–20:
      Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out.
  2. Sorely.

Noun[edit]

Sores

sore (plural sores)

  1. An injured, infected, inflamed or diseased patch of skin.
    They put ointment and a bandage on the sore.
  2. Grief; affliction; trouble; difficulty.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      I see plainly where his sore lies.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sore (third-person singular simple present sores, present participle soring, simple past and past participle sored)

  1. (transitive) To mutilate the legs or feet of (a horse) in order to induce a particular gait.
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See sord.

Noun[edit]

sore (plural sores)

  1. A group of ducks on land.

Etymology 3[edit]

Old French saur, sor, meaning "sorrel; reddish".

Noun[edit]

sore (plural sores)

  1. A young hawk or falcon in its first year.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  2. A young buck in its fourth year.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin supra.

Preposition[edit]

sore

  1. over
  2. above

Adverb[edit]

sore

  1. above
  2. on top
  3. up

Derived terms[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

sore

  1. afternoon (part of the day between noon and evening)

Istro-Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sōl, sōlem (compare Romanian soare); from Proto-Italic [Term?], from pre-Italic *sh₂wōl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥. Compare Romanian soare.

Noun[edit]

sore m (definite singular sorele, plural sori)

  1. sun

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sore

  1. Rōmaji transcription of それ

Malay[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Indonesian sore.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sore

  1. afternoon (part of the day between noon and evening)

Synonyms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French seür.

Adverb[edit]

sore

  1. Alternative form of sure

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English sār, from Proto-Germanic *sairą (noun), *sairaz (adjective)

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Early ME, Northern ME) IPA(key): /sɑːr/
  • IPA(key): /sɔːr/

Adjective[edit]

sore (inflected form sore, comparative sorer, sorrer, superlative sorest)

  1. Senses associated with pain:
    1. Harmful; creating or producing pain.
    2. Sore, hurting, injured; currently in pain or wounded or affected by it.
    3. Capable of inducing or creating pain or wounds; rending or dire.
  2. Senses associated with anguish:
    1. Harmful; creating or producing anguish, sadness or torment.
    2. Upset, distressed; currently in agony or anguish or affected by it.
  3. Challenging, complicated, laborious; requiring a large expenditure of one's energies:
    1. Challenging to deal with on the battlefield; violent, intense, mighty.
    2. Challenging to deal with; inducing great anguish.
  4. (Used with words relating to pain, soreness, or anguish) Very, strongly, bad, grievously.
  5. Malicious, iniquitous, malign; not morally or spiritually in the right.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Noun[edit]

sore (plural sores)

  1. The condition of bodily painfulness or hurting.
  2. A condition of anguish or affliction of the thought; injury of the mind:
    1. An issue or difficulty, especially one that causes great distress or evil.
    2. Regret; remorsefulness; anguish over one's past actions.
    3. (rare) The state of being scared or frightened.
  3. A specific affliction or condition:.
    1. A medical or pathological affliction or condition; a malady.
    2. A physical affliction or condition; a sore or wound.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sore (comparative sorer, sorrer, superlative sorest)

  1. Hurtfully, harmfully; in a way which creates wounds, painfulness, or anguish:
    1. Strictly, mercilessly, remorselessly; without attention to kindness or mercy.
    2. Expensively; in a way which creates a monetary or resource setback.
  2. With intense effort, prowess, or capability:
    1. Viciously, mightily, ruthlessly, strongly; using intense strength or prowess in battle.
    2. Nimbly, powerfully, quickly; using intense dexterity or physical force.
    3. Toilingly; backbreakingly, painstakingly; with much work.
    4. With great patience and focus; diligently; patiently.
  3. (Especially used with words relating to feelings or thought) Very, extremely, incredibly, a lot.
  4. Taut, secure; held strongly and with security.
  5. While suffering or experiencing an injury or pain.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old French essorer.

Verb[edit]

sore

  1. Alternative form of soren

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old French sor.

Noun[edit]

sore

  1. Alternative form of sor

Etymology 5[edit]

From Anglo-Norman soree.

Noun[edit]

sore

  1. Alternative form of sorre