sore

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See also: söre and -sore

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sor, from Old English sār (ache, wound, noun) and sār (painful, grievous, adjective), from Proto-Germanic *sairą (noun) (compare Dutch zeer (sore, ache), Danish sår (wound)), and *sairaz (sore, adjective) (compare German sehr (very)), from Proto-Indo-European *sh₂eyro-, enlargement of *sh₂ey- (to be fierce, afflict) (compare Hittite [script needed] (sāwar, anger), Welsh hoed (pain), Ancient Greek αἱμωδία (haimōdía, sensation of having teeth on edge)).

Adjective[edit]

sore (comparative sorer, superlative sorest)

  1. Causing pain or discomfort; painfully sensitive.
    Her feet were sore from walking so far.
  2. Sensitive; tender; easily pained, grieved, or vexed; very susceptible of irritation.
    • Tillotson
      Malice and hatred are very fretting and vexatious, and apt to make our minds sore and uneasy.
  3. Dire; distressing.
    The school was in sore need of textbooks, theirs having been ruined in the flood.
  4. (informal) Feeling animosity towards someone; annoyed or angered.
    Joe was sore at Bob for beating him at checkers.
  5. (obsolete) Criminal; wrong; evil.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sore (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Very, excessively, extremely (of something bad).
    They were sore afraid.  The knight was sore wounded.
    • 1859, Alfred Tennyson, “Elaine”, in Idylls of the King, London: Edward Moxon & Co., [], OCLC 911789798, pages 174–175:
      But on that day when Lancelot fled the lists, / His party, knights of utmost North and West, / Lords of waste marches, kings of desolate isles, / Came round their great Pendragon, saying to him / 'Lo, Sire, our knight thro' whom we won the day / Hath gone sore wounded, and hath left his prize / Untaken, crying that his prize is death.'
    • 1879, R[ichard] J[efferies], “The Old Punt: A Curious ‘Turnpike’”, in The Amateur Poacher, London: Smith, Elder, & Co., [], OCLC 752825175, pages 19–20:
      Orion hit a rabbit once; but though sore wounded it got to the bury, and, struggling in, the arrow caught the side of the hole and was drawn out.
  2. Sorely.
    • 1919, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Jungle Tales of Tarzan
      [… they] were often sore pressed to follow the trail at all, and at best were so delayed that in the afternoon of the second day, they still had not overhauled the fugitive.

Noun[edit]

Sores

sore (plural sores)

  1. An injured, infected, inflamed or diseased patch of skin.
    They put ointment and a bandage on the sore.
  2. Grief; affliction; trouble; difficulty.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      I see plainly where his sore lies.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sore (third-person singular simple present sores, present participle soring, simple past and past participle sored)

  1. (transitive) To mutilate the legs or feet of (a horse) in order to induce a particular gait.
Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See sord.

Noun[edit]

sore (plural sores)

  1. A group of ducks on land.

Etymology 3[edit]

Old French saur, sor, meaning "sorrel; reddish".

Noun[edit]

sore (plural sores)

  1. A young hawk or falcon in its first year.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  2. A young buck in its fourth year.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin supra.

Preposition[edit]

sore

  1. over
  2. above

Adverb[edit]

sore

  1. above
  2. on top
  3. up

Derived terms[edit]


Indonesian[edit]

Noun[edit]

sore

  1. afternoon (part of the day between noon and evening)

Istro-Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sōl, sōlem (compare Romanian soare); from Proto-Italic [Term?], from pre-Italic *sh₂wōl, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥. Compare Romanian soare.

Noun[edit]

sore m (definite singular sorele, plural sori)

  1. sun

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sore

  1. Rōmaji transcription of それ

Malay[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Indonesian sore.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sore

  1. afternoon (part of the day between noon and evening)

Synonyms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French seür.

Adverb[edit]

sore

  1. Alternative form of sure

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English sār, from Proto-Germanic *sairą (noun), *sairaz (adjective)

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Early ME, Northern ME) IPA(key): /sɑːr/
  • IPA(key): /sɔːr/

Adjective[edit]

sore (comparative sorer, sorrer, superlative sorest)

  1. Senses associated with pain:
    1. Harmful; creating or producing pain.
    2. Sore, hurting, injured; currently in pain or wounded or affected by it.
    3. Capable of inducing or creating pain or wounds; rending or dire.
  2. Senses associated with anguish:
    1. Harmful; creating or producing anguish, sadness or torment.
    2. Upset, distressed; currently in agony or anguish or affected by it.
  3. Challenging, complicated, laborious; requiring a large expenditure of one's energies:
    1. Challenging to deal with on the battlefield; violent, intense, mighty.
    2. Challenging to deal with; inducing great anguish.
  4. (Used with words relating to pain, soreness, or anguish) Very, strongly, bad, grievously.
  5. Malicious, iniquitous, malign; not morally or spiritually in the right.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Noun[edit]

sore (plural sores)

  1. The condition of bodily painfulness or hurting.
  2. A condition of anguish or affliction of the thought; injury of the mind:
    1. An issue or difficulty, especially one that causes great distress or evil.
    2. Regret; remorsefulness; anguish over one's past actions.
    3. (rare) The state of being scared or frightened.
  3. A specific affliction or condition:.
    1. A medical or pathological affliction or condition; a malady.
    2. A physical affliction or condition; a sore or wound.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sore (comparative sorer, sorrer, superlative sorest)

  1. Hurtfully, harmfully; in a way which creates wounds, painfulness, or anguish:
    1. Strictly, mercilessly, remorselessly; without attention to kindness or mercy.
    2. Expensively; in a way which creates a monetary or resource setback.
  2. With intense effort, prowess, or capability:
    1. Viciously, mightily, ruthlessly, strongly; using intense strength or prowess in battle.
    2. Nimbly, powerfully, quickly; using intense dexterity or physical force.
    3. Toilingly; backbreakingly, painstakingly; with much work.
    4. With great patience and focus; diligently; patiently.
  3. (Especially used with words relating to feelings or thought) Very, extremely, incredibly, a lot.
  4. Taut, secure; held strongly and with security.
  5. While suffering or experiencing an injury or pain.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old French essorer.

Verb[edit]

sore

  1. Alternative form of soren

Etymology 4[edit]

From Old French sor.

Noun[edit]

sore

  1. Alternative form of sor

Etymology 5[edit]

From Anglo-Norman soree.

Noun[edit]

sore

  1. Alternative form of sorre