sar

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Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin saliō. Compare Romanian sări, sar.

Verb[edit]

sar (third-person singular present sari or sare, past participle sãritã)

  1. I jump, leap.

Related terms[edit]


Burushaski[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sar (plural saro)

  1. rabbit

References[edit]

  • Sadaf Munshi (2015), “Word Lists”, in Burushaski Language Documentation Project[1]

Chuukese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sar

  1. over, finished

Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Iranian [Term?], from Proto-Indo-Iranian [Term?], from Proto-Indo-European *gel- (cold). Compare Persian سرد(sard, cold), Sanskrit शीत (śīta, cold), and English cold.

Adjective[edit]

sar (comparative sartir, superlative sartirîn)

  1. (Kurmanji) cold

Maltese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic صارَ(ṣāra).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sar (imperfect jsir, past participle misjur)

  1. (copulative) to become
    Studjat il-Latin u saret għalliema.
    She studied Latin and became a teacher.
  2. (with imperfect verb) to come to; to start to
    Sirt nifhem xi jfisser tkun fqir.
    I came to understand what it means to be poor.
  3. (intransitive, of fruits) to ripen
  4. (intransitive, of food) to be cooking; to become ready; to be in the oven, on the hob
    Is-soppa qed issir.
    The soup is cooking.

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English sār.

Noun[edit]

sar

  1. Alternative form of sore

Descendants[edit]

  • Scots: sare, sair
  • English: sore

Old Danish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sár, from Proto-Germanic *sairą.

Noun[edit]

sār n (genitive sārs, plural sār)

  1. (Scania) wound
    • c. 1210, "Far horkarl sar", Scanian Law, chapter 216.
      Far horkarl sar innæn siangu mæþ annærs manz kunu []
      If a male prostitute gets wounds in bed with another man's wife []

Descendants[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *sair, from Proto-Germanic *sairaz.

Adjective[edit]

sār

  1. sore
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *sair, from Proto-Germanic *sairą.

Noun[edit]

sār n

  1. pain
  2. soreness
Descendants[edit]

Romani[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sar

  1. how
  2. as

Romanian[edit]

Verb[edit]

sar

  1. inflection of sări:
    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. third-person plural present indicative