taut

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See also: taut- and ta ut

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English taught, toft, toght, tohte, toth, tought, touht, tout, touȝt, touʒt, towght, towht, towt, towte, toȝt, toʒte, Early Middle English tohte, towehte (strained, stretched; distended; tight; firm),[1] probably from tough, touth, touʒth, toʒt (powerful, strong; fierce, violent; not tender, tough; hardy, resilient; steadfast, stout; difficult to do or endure)[2] and possibly influenced by togen, towen, past participle of ten (to extend, stretch out; to drag, haul, pull, tow, tug) (modern English tee ((obsolete) to draw, lead; to draw away; to go, proceed)), or directly from its etymon Old English tēon (to drag, draw, pull) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dewk- (to draw, pull))[1] The word may be related to thight ((dialectal) compact, dense; close-fitting, tight) and tight;[3] and is cognate with Scots tacht, taght (taut).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

taut (comparative tauter, superlative tautest)

  1. (also figuratively) Under tension, like a stretched bowstring, rope, or sail; tight.
    Synonyms: nonslack, stretched, tense, tensioned; see also Thesaurus:taut
    Antonyms: untaut; see also Thesaurus:loose
    • 1881–1882, Robert Louis Stevenson, “The Ebb-tide Runs”, in Treasure Island, London; Paris: Cassell & Company, Limited, published 14 November 1883, OCLC 702939134, part V (My Sea Adventure), page 185:
      The hawser was as taut as a bowstring, and the current so strong she pulled upon her anchor. All around the hull, in the blackness, the rippling current bubbled and chattered like a little mountain stream.
    • 1912, Roald Amundsen, “The End of the Winter”, in A. G. Chater, transl., The South Pole: An Account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the “Fram,” 1910–1912 [...] Translated from the Norwegian [...] In Two Volumes, volume I, London: John Murray, [], OCLC 557852685, page 350:
      Every piece of binding is first carefully examined and tested; then it is put on, cautiously and accurately. Every turn is hauled taut, taking care that it is in its right place. [...] A sledge journey of the kind we had before us is a serious undertaking, and the work has to be done seriously.
    • 1914, Constance Lytton and Jane Warton [pseudonym; Lady Constance Bulwer-Lytton], “My Conversion”, in Prisons & Prisoners: Some Personal Experiences, London: William Heinemann, OCLC 1067081057, page 19:
      After some moments of interchanging messages with the leaders on the platform, during which the suspense in the hall was tremendously taut, the police left saying that the women arrested would have to report themselves at Bow Street the following morning.
    • 2007, Anthony Neilson, The Wonderful World of Dissocia, London: Methuen Drama, →ISBN; republished London; New York, N.Y.: Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, Bloomsbury Publishing, 2015, →ISBN, Act I, page 25:
      Lisa Jones – a woman in her thirties – sits cross-legged onstage, absent-mindedly tuning the high E-string on an acoustic guitar. She tunes the string up and up until it reaches the correct note – and then continues on past it. [...] Higher and higher the note, the string growing ever more taut, the fretboard beginning to tremble under the strain, the tension rising – but she still winds the tuning peg, up and up and up and up until … … the string snaps!
    • 2015, Win Blevins; Meredith Blevins, “Apocalypso Now”, in Moonlight Water (A Forge Book), New York, N.Y.: Tom Doherty Associates, →ISBN, page 316:
      As Red played the intro, he allowed himself a passing glance at her. She was at the back of the crowd, face taut.
  2. Of a body, muscles, etc.: not flabby; firm, toned; of a person: having a lean, strong body.
    • 2014 July, Miles J. Unger, “The Giant”, in Michelangelo: A Life in Six Masterpieces, New York, N.Y.: Simon & Schuster, →ISBN, page 108:
      In a sense, Michelangelo's David is everything his Bacchus was not: firmly in control of himself while the god of wine was teetering on the brink of dissolution; his senses heightened while Bacchus's are dulled. Where one is taut, the other is flaccid. David's toned, athletic body contrasts with Bacchus's effeminate form, illustrating the dichotomy in Michelangelo's mind between the active masculine force and the passive feminine.
    • 2015, Lindsay McKenna, “[Hidden Heart] Chapter 7”, in Lindsay McKenna; Merline Lovelace; Patience Bloom, editor, Course of Action: Crossfire (Harlequin Romantic Suspense; 1853), Don Mills, Ont.: Harlequin Books, →ISBN, page 111:
      The silky sarong fell away, pooling around her hips with a whisper. Her nipples were pink and taut, the rest of her naked body a soft glow as moonlight flowed through the living room.
  3. Of music, writing, etc.: containing only relevant parts; brief and controlled.
    Synonyms: concise, crisp, terse, tight; see also Thesaurus:concise
    Antonyms: see Thesaurus:verbose
  4. (figuratively) Experiencing anxiety or stress.
    Synonyms: nonrelaxed, strained, tense, unrelaxed
  5. (nautical) Of a sailor or a ship: neat and well-disciplined; (by extension) efficient and in order.
  6. (oenology) Strong; uncompromising.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

taut (third-person singular simple present tauts, present participle tauting, simple past and past participle tauted)

  1. (transitive) To make taut; to tauten, to tighten.
    • 1917 August, The Road-maker, volume 2, number 5, Port Huron, Mich.: [s.n.], OCLC 781682117, page 18, column 2:
      The machine is operated by a double friction drum hoist. From the rear drum a steel cable, called the tension cable, leads to a set of fall blocks attached to the mast pole. These blocks afford a means for slackening and tauting the track cable, one end of which is supported by the fall blocks and the other fastened to a "dead man" or other suitable anchorage planted in the bank of the pit opposite the dumping point.
    • 1920 May, F[rancis] Scott Fitzgerald, “The Cut-Glass Bowl”, in Flappers and Philosophers, New York, N.Y.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, OCLC 623621399, part IV, page 153:
      The cold wind blew in again through the front door, and with a desperate, frantic energy Evelyn stretched both her arms around the bowl. She must be quick—she must be strong. She tightened her arms until they ached, tauted the thin strips of muscle under her soft flesh, and with a mighty effort raised it and held it.
    • 2010, Gary Allen, “Piggyback”, in The Next Room, Belfast: Lapwing Publications, →ISBN, page 16:
      Men come down to the bare nail / suffer or inflict pain // life demands degradation / tauts the thread that hangs us all: [...]
    • 2016, J. Vogelsang; G. Huber; T[heodoros] Triantafyllidis; T. Bender, “Interpretation of Vibratory Pile Penetration Based on Digital Image Correlation”, in Theodoros Triantafyllidis, editor, Holistic Simulation of Geotechnical Installation Processes: Benchmarks and Simulations (Lecture Notes in Applied and Computational Mechanics; 80), Cham, Switzerland; Heidelberg: Springer International Publishing, DOI:10.1007/978-3-319-23159-4, →ISBN, ISSN 1613-7736, section 2.3 (Instrumentation and Data Acquisition), pages 35–36:
      The global penetration is measured with a potentiometric displacement sensor connected to an impeller. A thin steel cable is fastened with a spring to the vibrator and runs over the rim of the impeller. On the other side, a counterweight of 0.4 kg tauts the cable, [...].

References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 tought, adj.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ tough, adj.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  3. ^ taut, adj.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2014; “taut, adj.” in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press.

Anagrams[edit]


Finnish[edit]

Noun[edit]

taut

  1. Nominative plural form of tau.

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

taut

  1. Third-person singular present of tauen.
  2. Second-person plural present of tauen.
  3. Imperative plural of tauen.

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

tau +‎ -t

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈtɒut]
  • Hyphenation: ta‧ut

Noun[edit]

taut

  1. accusative singular of tau

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

taut n (genitive singular tauts, no plural)

  1. muttering, mumbling
    Synonyms: tuldur, muldur, uml

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Finnish taltta.

Noun[edit]

taut

  1. chisel