stress

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See also: Stress

English[edit]

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

Wikipedia Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English destresse, from Old French, from Latin stringere (to draw tight).[1]

In the sense of "mental strain" or “disruption”, used occasionally in the 1920s and 1930s by psychologists, including Walter Cannon (1934); in “biological threat”, used by endocrinologist Hans Selye, by metaphor with stress in physics (force on an object) in the 1930s, and popularized by same in the 1950s.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stress (countable and uncountable, plural stresses)

  1. (countable, physics) The internal distribution of force per unit area (pressure) within a body reacting to applied forces which causes strain or deformation and is typically symbolised by σ
  2. (countable, physics) externally applied to a body which cause internal stress within the body.
  3. (uncountable) Emotional pressure suffered by a human being or other animal.
    Go easy on him, he's been under a lot of stress lately.
  4. (uncountable, phonetics) The emphasis placed on a syllable of a word.
    Some people put the stress on the first syllable of “controversy”; others put it on the second.
  5. (uncountable) Emphasis placed on words in speaking.
  6. (uncountable) Emphasis placed on a particular point in an argument or discussion (whether spoken or written).
  7. Obsolete form of distress.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  8. (Scotland, law) distress; the act of distraining; also, the thing distrained.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb[edit]

stress (third-person singular simple present stresses, present participle stressing, simple past and past participle stressed)

  1. To apply force to (a body or structure) causing strain.
  2. To apply emotional pressure to (a person or animal).
  3. (informal) To suffer stress; to worry or be agitated.
  4. To emphasise (a syllable of a word).
    “Emphasis” is stressed on the first syllable, but “emphatic” is stressed on the second.
  5. To emphasise (words in speaking).
  6. To emphasise (a point) in an argument or discussion.
    I must stress that this information is given in strict confidence.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Keil, R.M.K. (2004) Coping and stress: a conceptual analysis Journal of Advanced Nursing, 45(6), 659–665

Related terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English stress.

Noun[edit]

stress c, n (singular definite stressen or stresset, not used in plural)

  1. stress

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stress m (uncountable)

  1. stress

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English stress

Noun[edit]

stress m (uncountable)

  1. stress (emotional pressure)

Derived terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

stress n (genitive singular stress, no plural)

  1. stress

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

English

Noun[edit]

stress m (invariable)

  1. stress

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

stress m (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of estresse.