tort

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See also: -tort, to'rt, and tört

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English tort ((uncountable) wrong; (countable) an injury, a wrong),[1] from Old French tort (misdeed, wrong) (modern French tort (an error, wrong; a fault)), from Medieval Latin tortum (injustice, wrong), a noun use of a neuter singular participle form of Latin tortus (crooked; twisted), the perfect passive participle of torqueō (to bend or twist awry, distort),[2] ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *terkʷ- (to spin; to turn).

Noun[edit]

tort (plural torts)

  1. (law) A wrongful act, whether intentional or negligent, regarded as non-criminal and unrelated to a contract, which causes an injury and can be remedied in civil court, usually through the awarding of damages. [from late 16th c.]
    Synonym: (Scots law) delict
    • [1628, Edw[ard] Coke, “Of Rents”, in The First Part of the Institutes of the Lawes of England. [], London: [] [Adam Islip] for the Societe of Stationers, →OCLC, book 2, chapter 12, section 234, folio 158, verso:
      [] Wrong or Iniury, is in French aptly called Tort, becauſe Iniury & wrong is wreſted or crooked, being contrary to that which is right and ſtreight. [] And Britton ſaith that Tort a la ley eſt contrarye [a wrong to the law is contrary], and as aptly for the cauſe aforeſaid is iniury in English called wrong.]
    • 1768, William Blackstone, “Of Wrongs, and Their Remedies, Respecting the Rights of Persons”, in Commentaries on the Laws of England, book III (Of Private Wrongs), Oxford, Oxfordshire: [] Clarendon Press, →OCLC, page 117:
      Personal actions are ſuch vvhereby a man claims a debt, or perſonal duty, or damages in lieu thereof; and likevviſe vvhereby a man claims a ſatisfaction in damages for ſome injury done to his perſon or property. The former are ſaid to be founded on contracts, the latter upon torts or vvrongs: [] of the latter all actions for treſpaſſes, nuſances, aſſaults, defamatory vvords, and the like.
    • 1891, Henry Campbell Black, “TORT”, in A Dictionary of Law [], St. Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Co., →OCLC, page 1178, column 1:
      A tort is a legal wrong committed upon the person or property independent of contract. It may be either (1) a direct invasion of some legal right of the individual; (2) the infraction of some public duty by which special damage accrues to the individual; (3) the violation of some private obligation by which like damage accrues to the individual.
  2. (obsolete) An injury or wrong. [late 14th – 18th c.]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English tort, torte (contorted, crooked; twisted),[3] from Old French tort, torte (crooked; twisted), or from its etymon Latin tortus (crooked; twisted):[4] see further at etymology 1.

Adjective[edit]

tort

  1. (obsolete) Twisted.

Etymology 3[edit]

A variant of tart.[5][6]

Adjective[edit]

tort (comparative more tort, superlative most tort)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) Synonym of tart (sharp- or sour-tasting; (figuratively) keen, severe, sharp”)
Translations[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

A variant of taut.[5][7]

Adjective[edit]

tort (comparative torter, superlative tortest) (Britain, dialectal, obsolete)

  1. Synonym of taut (stretched tight; under tension)
    • 1847, R[alph] W[aldo] Emerson, “Initial, Dæmonic, and Celestial Love”, in Poems, Boston, Mass.: James Munroe and Company, →OCLC, part I (The Initial Love), page 158:
      Yet holds he them with tortest rein, / That they may seize and entertain / The glance that to their glance opposes, / Like fiery honey sucked from roses.
  2. (nautical) Of a boat: watertight.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

Clipping of tortoise.

Noun[edit]

tort (plural torts)

  1. (slang) Clipping of tortoise.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 6[edit]

Clipping of tortoiseshell.

Noun[edit]

tort (plural torts)

  1. (slang) Clipping of tortoiseshell (a domestic cat, guinea pig, rabbit, or other animal whose fur has black, brown, and yellow markings); a tortie.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ tort, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ tort, n.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2022; “tort, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  3. ^ tort(e, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  4. ^ † tort, adj.”, in OED Online Paid subscription required, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Joseph Wright, editor (1905), “TORT”, in The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume VI (T–Z, Supplement, Bibliography and Grammar), London: Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, →OCLC, page 198, column 2.
  6. ^ Joseph Wright, editor (1905), “TART, adj. and sb.2”, in The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume VI (T–Z, Supplement, Bibliography and Grammar), London: Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, →OCLC, page 35.
  7. ^ Joseph Wright, editor (1905), “TAUT, adj. and v.1”, in The English Dialect Dictionary: [], volume VI (T–Z, Supplement, Bibliography and Grammar), London: Henry Frowde, [], publisher to the English Dialect Society, []; New York, N.Y.: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, →OCLC, page 42, column 2.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old Catalan tort, from Latin tortus (twisted).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tort (feminine torta, masculine plural torts, feminine plural tortes)

  1. bent, twisted, crooked, askew, wonky
  2. one-eyed
    Synonym: borni

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

tort m (plural torts)

  1. harm, injury
    Synonym: dany

References[edit]

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Torte.

Noun[edit]

tort (genitive tordi, partitive torti)

  1. large cake; cream cake, gateau
    Synonyms: kook, keeks

Declension[edit]

Declension of tort (ÕS type 22e/riik, t-d gradation)
singular plural
nominative tort tordid
accusative nom.
gen. tordi
genitive tortide
partitive torti torte
tortisid
illative torti
tordisse
tortidesse
tordesse
inessive tordis tortides
tordes
elative tordist tortidest
tordest
allative tordile tortidele
tordele
adessive tordil tortidel
tordel
ablative tordilt tortidelt
tordelt
translative tordiks tortideks
tordeks
terminative tordini tortideni
essive tordina tortidena
abessive tordita tortideta
comitative tordiga tortidega

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old French tort, from Latin tortum, substantive use of tortus, the past participle of torqueō (twist, turn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tort m (plural torts)

  1. fault
    Elle a le tort d’avoir trop de précipitation.Her trouble is, she's too hasty.
    Le mari n’a aucun tort.The husband is not to blame.
  2. wrong, error
    Je regrette, vous avez tort. I'm afraid you are mistaken.
    Nous avons fait notre choix, à tort ou à raison. We have made our choice, rightly or wrongly.
    • 1837, Louis Viardot, L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manchefr.Wikisource, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Volume I, Chapter IV:
      [J]e suis le valeureux don Quichotte de la Manche, le défaiseur de torts et le réparateur d’iniquités.
      ... I am the valiant Don Quixote of La Mancha, the undoer of wrongs and the repairer of iniquities.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

tor +‎ -t (accusative suffix)

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈtort]
  • Hyphenation: tort

Noun[edit]

tort

  1. accusative singular of tor

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French tort, from Latin tortum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tort (plural tortes)

  1. (rare, especially law) tort (wrong)

Descendants[edit]

  • English: tort
  • Scots: tort

References[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French tort, from Latin tortum.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tort

  1. (law) offense against someone, an insult or inconvenience caused to someone

Usage notes[edit]

Only used in the legal phrase tort og svie.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

tort

  1. supine of tora

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tortum, substantive use of tortus, the past participle of torqueō (twist, turn).

Noun[edit]

tort oblique singularm (oblique plural torz or tortz, nominative singular torz or tortz, nominative plural tort)

  1. wrong; misdeed (something considered wrong)
    • 12th Century, Béroul, Tristan et Iseut:
      Sovent regrete le roi Marc
      Son oncle, qui a fait tel tort
      King Mark often regretted
      That his uncle had done such a bad thing

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tortum, substantive use of tortus, the past participle of torqueō (twist, turn).

Noun[edit]

tort m (oblique plural tortz, nominative singular tortz, nominative plural tort)

  1. wrong (immoral act)
  2. error; mistake

References[edit]

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl
tort

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from German Torte.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tort m inan (diminutive torcik, related adjective tortowy)

  1. torte, gateau (type of cake)
  2. birthday cake

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

noun

Further reading[edit]

  • tort in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • tort in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Latin tortus.

Noun[edit]

tort n (plural torturi)

  1. thread (spun and made of hemp)
  2. quantity of spun threads
Declension[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from German Torte.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

tort n (plural torturi)

  1. cake
Declension[edit]
See also[edit]

Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

tort

  1. tart
  2. cake

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of tort (inflection type 6/kuva)
nominative sing. tort
genitive sing. tortan
partitive sing. tortad
partitive plur. tortid
singular plural
nominative tort tortad
accusative tortan tortad
genitive tortan tortiden
partitive tortad tortid
essive-instructive tortan tortin
translative tortaks tortikš
inessive tortas tortiš
elative tortaspäi tortišpäi
illative tortaha
tortha
tortihe
adessive tortal tortil
ablative tortalpäi tortilpäi
allative tortale tortile
abessive tortata tortita
comitative tortanke tortidenke
prolative tortadme tortidme
approximative I tortanno tortidenno
approximative II tortannoks tortidennoks
egressive tortannopäi tortidennopäi
terminative I tortahasai
torthasai
tortihesai
terminative II tortalesai tortilesai
terminative III tortassai
additive I tortahapäi
torthapäi
tortihepäi
additive II tortalepäi tortilepäi

References[edit]

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), “торт”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika