tore

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Tore, torē, töre, törĕ, tőre, and -tore

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English tor, tore, toor, from Old Norse tor- (hard, difficult, wrong, bad, prefix), from Proto-Germanic *tuz- (hard, difficult, wrong, bad), from Proto-Indo-European *dus- (bad, ill, difficult), from Proto-Indo-European *dēwǝ- (to fail, be behind, be lacking). Cognate with Old High German zur- (mis-, prefix), Gothic 𐍄𐌿𐌶- (tuz-, hard, difficult, prefix), Ancient Greek δυσ- (dus-, bad, ill, difficult, prefix). More at dys-.

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tore (comparative more tore, superlative most tore)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Hard, difficult; wearisome, tedious.
  2. (dialectal or obsolete) Strong, sturdy; great, massive.
  3. (dialectal or obsolete) Full; rich.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

tore

  1. simple past tense of tear (rip, rend, speed).
  2. (now colloquial, nonstandard) past participle of tear (rip, rend, speed)
Usage notes[edit]
  • The past tense of the other verb tear, meaning "produce liquid from the eyes", is teared.

Etymology 3[edit]

See torus.

Noun[edit]

tore (plural tores)

  1. (architecture) Alternative form of torus
  2. (geometry) The surface described by the circumference of a circle revolving about a straight line in its own plane.
  3. The solid enclosed by such a surface; an anchor ring.

Etymology 4[edit]

Probably from the root of tear; compare Welsh word for a break or cut.

Noun[edit]

tore (uncountable)

  1. The dead grass that remains on mowing land in winter and spring.
    • 1707, J[ohn] Mortimer, The Whole Art of Husbandry; or, The Way of Managing and Improving of Land. [], 2nd edition, London: [] J[ohn] H[umphreys] for H[enry] Mortlock [], and J[onathan] Robinson [], published 1708, OCLC 13320837:
      the more Tore you have, the less Quantity of Hay will do

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for tore in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tore (genitive toreda, partitive toredat)

  1. fine, splendid

Declension[edit]


French[edit]

tore

Etymology[edit]

From Latin torus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tore m (plural tores)

  1. (geometry) torus

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

tore

  1. vocative singular of torus

Ngarrindjeri[edit]

Noun[edit]

tore

  1. mouth

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse þora, of further back unknown origin. Cognates include Icelandic þora and Faroese tora. Some also come in their mediopassive variants, Swedish töras and Westrobothnian tåras, as does also the deponent Norwegian Nynorsk torast.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • tora (a- and split infinitives)

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tore (present tense torer or tør, past tense torde, supine tort)

  1. (intransitive) to dare

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Connected to Old Norse Þórr (Tor, Thor).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tore f (definite singular tora, indefinite plural torer, definite plural torene)

  1. a thunder
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

tore (present tense torar, past tense tora, past participle tora, passive infinitive torast, present participle torande, imperative tor)

  1. (impersonal, metereology) to thunder
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) to rage
    Synonyms: buldre, skjenne, smelle
Alternative forms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse tóra (to live life meazelly).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tore (present tense torar, past tense tora, past participle tora, passive infinitive torast, present participle torande, imperative tor)

  1. (intransitive, about fire) to burn weakly

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Tagalog[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish torre.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: to‧re
  • IPA(key): /ˈtoɾɛ/

Noun[edit]

tore

  1. tower
  2. (chess) rook

Coordinate terms[edit]

Chess pieces in Tagalog · mga piyesa sa ahedres (layout · text)
♚ ♛ ♜ ♝ ♞ ♟
hari reyna tore obispo/alpil kabayo peon

Further reading[edit]


Ternate[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

tore

  1. (stative) to be dried

References[edit]

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh