dys-

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See also: dys

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From New Latin dys-, from Ancient Greek δυσ- (dus-, hard, difficult, bad).

Prefix[edit]

dys-

  1. difficult
  2. bad
    1. unhealthy, harmful
    2. painful
    3. incorrect
    4. poor, deficient
  3. abnormal
  4. to fail
  5. inability, unable
  6. (pathology) malady, disease
  7. not

Synonyms[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɪs/, /dis/
  • (file)

Prefix[edit]

dys-

  1. dys-

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek δυσ- (dus-) expressing the idea of difficulty, or bad status.

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

dys-

  1. bad status
  2. malfunctioning

Derived terms[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek δυσ- (dus-).

Prefix[edit]

dys-

  1. Used to convey the idea of being difficult, impaired, abnormal, or bad

Usage notes[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Prefix[edit]

dys-

  1. Alternative form of dis-

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek δυσ- (dus-).

Prefix[edit]

dys-

  1. dys-

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek δυσ- (dus-).

Prefix[edit]

dys-

  1. dys-

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Internationalism; compare English dis-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Prefix[edit]

dys-

  1. dys-
    dys- + ‎harmonia → ‎dysharmonia

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • dys- in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • dys- in Polish dictionaries at PWN