harmonia

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἁρμονίᾱ (harmoníā). Doublet of harmony.

Noun[edit]

harmonia (plural harmoniai)

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    • 1949, Harry Partch, Genesis of a Music: Monophony: the Relation of Its Music to Historic and Contemporary Trends; Its Philosophy, Concepts, and Principles; Its Relation to Historic and Proposed Intonations; and Its Application to Musical Instruments, The University of Wisconsin Press, pages 320 and 323:
      [] concerning the ancient Greek harmoniai, or modes, in the diatonic genus. [] degree signify the harmonia in which it appears and what degree it represents; for instance, “D-2” means that this ratio—11/10—is the second degree (ascending) in the Dorian harmonia.
    • 1991, 1/1: The Quarterly Journal of the Just Intonation Network, pages 4 and 5:
      In the case of Mixolydian harmonia, the framework chord is 11, 1411, 1410, and 21. [] while the various diatonic harmoniai are modes of each other, this is not true of the other two genera, which are uniquely derived from their corresponding diatonic forms.
    • 1993, John H. Chalmers, Jr., Divisions of the Tetrachord: A Prolegomenon to the Construction of Musical Scales, →ISBN, page 146:
      In 1935, Hamilton trained a chamber orchestra in Stuttgart to perform in the harmoniai.
    • 1999, Thomas J. Mathiesen, Apollo’s Lyre: Greek Music and Music Theory in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, Lincoln, Neb.; London: University of Nebraska Press, →ISBN, page 183:
      While Pollux attributed to Diodorus of Thebes the expansion of the aulos beyond four trupemata, Athenaeus and Pausanias refer to Pronomus of Thebes as the one who developed an aulos that was capable of playing aulema in Dorian, Phrygian, or Lydian harmoniai. In his description of a statue of Pronomus in Boeotia, Pausanias observes: For a time, auletes had three types of auloi. They played Dorian aulema on one, different auloi were made for pieces in the Phrygian harmonia, and the so-called Lydian aulema was played on other auloi.
    • 2020, Edward Nowacki, Greek and Latin Music Theory: Principles and Challenges, University of Rochester Press, →ISBN, page 18:
      That rhythm was somehow implicated in the identity of the harmoniai is suggested in Aristotle’s anecdote about the composer Philoxenus, who attempted to compose a dithyramb, The Mysians, in the Dorian harmonia, but was unable to do so.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin harmonia, from Ancient Greek ἁρμονία (harmonía).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

harmonia f (plural harmonies)

  1. harmony

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From harmonio (harmony) +‎ -a (adjectival suffix).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): [harmoˈnia]
  • Rhymes: -ia
  • Hyphenation: har‧mo‧ni‧a

Adjective[edit]

harmonia (accusative singular harmonian, plural harmoniaj, accusative plural harmoniajn)

  1. harmonious

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɑrmoniɑ/, [ˈhɑrmo̞ˌniɑ]
  • Rhymes: -iɑ
  • Syllabification: har‧mo‧ni‧a

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin harmonia, from Ancient Greek ἁρμονία (harmonía).

Noun[edit]

harmonia

  1. harmony
Declension[edit]
Inflection of harmonia (Kotus type 12/kulkija, no gradation)
nominative harmonia harmoniat
genitive harmonian harmonioiden
harmonioitten
partitive harmoniaa harmonioita
illative harmoniaan harmonioihin
singular plural
nominative harmonia harmoniat
accusative nom. harmonia harmoniat
gen. harmonian
genitive harmonian harmonioiden
harmonioitten
harmoniainrare
partitive harmoniaa harmonioita
inessive harmoniassa harmonioissa
elative harmoniasta harmonioista
illative harmoniaan harmonioihin
adessive harmonialla harmonioilla
ablative harmonialta harmonioilta
allative harmonialle harmonioille
essive harmoniana harmonioina
translative harmoniaksi harmonioiksi
instructive harmonioin
abessive harmoniatta harmonioitta
comitative harmonioineen
Possessive forms of harmonia (type kulkija)
possessor singular plural
1st person harmoniani harmoniamme
2nd person harmoniasi harmonianne
3rd person harmoniansa

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

harmonia

  1. Partitive singular form of harmoni.

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἁρμονία (harmonía).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

harmonia f (genitive harmoniae); first declension

  1. harmony, concordance of sounds
  2. music, singing, song
  3. peace, concord

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative harmonia harmoniae
Genitive harmoniae harmoniārum
Dative harmoniae harmoniīs
Accusative harmoniam harmoniās
Ablative harmoniā harmoniīs
Vocative harmonia harmoniae

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin harmonia, from Ancient Greek ἁρμονία (harmonía).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /xarˈmɔɲ.ja/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔɲja
  • Syllabification: har‧mon‧ia

Noun[edit]

harmonia f

  1. harmony
  2. consonance
  3. concertina
  4. accordion
    Synonym: akordeon

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • harmonia in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • harmonia in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

From Latin harmonia, from Ancient Greek ἁρμονία (harmonía, joint, union, agreement, concord of sounds).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

harmonia f (plural harmonias)

  1. (uncountable) harmony; agreement; accord
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:harmonia
  2. harmony (pleasing arrangement of sounds)
    Synonyms: melodia, sinfonia

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]